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Mid Island Area Plan_201401290850502582MMIIDD--IISSLLAANNDD AARREEAA PPLLAANN “To produce and recommend implementation of an area plan to guide the future growth and character of the Mid-Island area while considering the needs of residents, businesses, and visitors, by addressing traffic, a pedestrian-friendly environment, affordable housing, improvements for public use, mixed use development, and creating greater efficiency of land use, all in keeping with the traditional character of the island.” AApppprroovveedd bbyy tthhee NNaannttuucckkeett PPllaannnniinngg aanndd EEccoonnoommiicc DDeevveellooppmmeenntt CCoommmmiissssiioonn oonn MMaarrcchh 33,, 22000033 Prepared by the Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission, with support from the Mid-Island Plan Work Group, the Mid-Island Partnership, The Preservation Institute: Nantucket, and Traditional Neighborhood Development, Inc. Sparks Avenue: Before Sparks Avenue: After? Hooper Farm @ Sparks Avenue: Before Hooper Farm @ Sparks Avenue: After _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS............................. 3 PREFACE ......................................................... 4 INTRODUCTION............................................ 5 BACKGROUND: INSPIRATION OF THE NANTUCKET COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY PLAN ........................................................................ 5 INITIATION OF THE WORK GROUP PROCESS BY THE MID-ISLAND PARTNERSHIP ...................... 6 PLANNING PROCESS EMPLOYED BY THE WORK GROUP ............................................................ 6 Mission Statement ...................................... 6 Identification of Issues ............................... 6 Prioritization of Issues ............................... 6 Retention of Consultants ............................ 7 Development of the Draft Plan; Public Informational Meetings.............................. 7 HISTORY AND FACTORS THAT INFLUENCED THE DEVELOPMENT OF MID-ISLAND AREA....................................... 8 THE INFLUENCE OF ZONING ............................ 9 THE INFLUENCE OF PROPERTY VALUES, THE ECONOMY AND RELATED DEVELOPMENT TRENDS ......................................................... 10 TRAFFIC ISSUES AND PATTERNS IN THE MID- ISLAND AREA: THE CROSSROADS OF THE ISLAND.......................................................... 11 Roads / Intersections ................................ 11 Pedestrian and Bicycle Systems ............... 12 Parking Systems ....................................... 13 Transit ...................................................... 14 ADDRESSING CHARACTER AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES: “GOING BACK TO TRADITIONAL PATTERNS”..... 16 INFILL STRATEGY/DESIGN GUIDELINES ........ 16 TRANSPORTATION STRATEGY ....................... 17 Re-examining street directional patterns .17 Fixing key intersections to deal with congestion and enhance traffic flow and safety ........................................................ 18 Creating on-street parking....................... 19 Creating common parking ....................... 19 Creating pedestrian systems .................... 19 Accommodating Bicycles ..........................20 Enhancing NRTA Service to the Mid-Island ...................................................................20 Public Amenities: Creating a Sense of Arrival and a Pedestrian Focus................20 THE CRAIG PROPERTY: A DIVERSITY OF PUBLIC BENEFIT OPPORTUNITIES...................20 FIRE STATION ................................................22 STOP & STOP .................................................22 THE POST OFFICE...........................................23 THE COMMONS ..............................................23 ORANGE STREET AND THE MARINE HOME CENTER..........................................................24 IMPLEMENTATION ..........................................24 THE PLAN: SHORT- AND LONG-TERM OBJECTIVES ..................................................25 LAND USE ......................................................25 HOUSING........................................................26 TRAFFIC / TRANSPORTATION .........................27 Streets, Intersections, and Pedestrian Improvements............................................27 Re-Examine Parking .................................28 Improve the System of Bike Paths.............28 Transit Improvements/Initiatives for the NRTA.........................................................29 INFRASTRUCTURE ..........................................29 APPENDIX A ..................................................31 APPENDIX B ..................................................33 APPENDIX C ..................................................34 APPENDIX D ..................................................35 APPENDIX E ..................................................49 APPENDIX F ..................................................51 APPENDIX G..................................................52 APPENDIX I ...................................................53 APPENDIX J ...................................................54 APPENDIX K..................................................55 _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 2 EXHIBITS Exhibit 1. 1998 Aerial Photo with Mid-Island Planning Boundary..................................... 5 Exhibit 2. 1940 Aerial Photo with Mid-Island Planning Boundary..................................... 8 Exhibit 3. 1972 Zoning Map .............................. 9 Exhibit 4. Current Zoning Map.......................... 9 Exhibit 5. Map of Collector and Local Roads .11 Exhibit 6. Map of Bike Path and Sidewalk System ...................................................... 12 Exhibit 7. Map of Parking Lot Locations ........ 13 Exhibit 8. Downtown pattern overlaid onto the Mid-Island ................................................ 14 Exhibit 9. NRTA Island-wide Shuttle System .14 Exhibit 10. Map of Shuttle Routes through the Mid-Island Area ........................................14 Exhibit 11. Map of the Plan ..............................16 Exhibit 12. Recommended Traffic Flow ..........17 Exhibit 13. Hooper Farm/Sparks Intersection Realignment ..............................................18 Exhibit 14. Four Corner Intersection Realignment ..............................................18 Exhibit 15. Hooper Farm/Sparks Intersection, Long-term .................................................19 Exhibit 16. On-Street Parking Plan...................19 Exhibit 17. Map of Plan in Stop & Shop Vicinity ...................................................................25 _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 3 AA CC KK NN OO WW LL EE DD GG EE MM EE NN TT SS The Mid-Island Area Plan Work Group would like to thank the following businesses, organizations and individuals whose financial contributions and support to date have assisted greatly in the development of our Area Plan. Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission Lower Pleasant Trust Tresses and the Day Spa Geronimo’s, Ltd. Nantucket Magazine Glidden’s Island Seafood Hutch’s Restaurant Hatch’s Package Store Nantucket Electric Company Nantucket Association of Real Estate Brokers Congdon & Coleman Pro Buyer Associates Mid-Island Partnership Fleet/Pacific National Bank Nantucket Bank Stop and Shop Cape Air/Nantucket Air Robert A. diCurcio Alvin Topham Susan Bennett Witte Robert A. Young _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 4 PP RR EE FF AA CC EE “Downtown Nantucket is one of the Island’s most cherished places. It is our emotional core, our economic foundation, and the link to our past. Its landscape is the result of the island’s rich history of remarkable human endeavor. From the humble beginnings of a small group of settlers stepping ashore at Warren’s Landing in late fall and sleeping under the stars, to large ships sailing the oceans of the world, Nantucket’s industrious inhabitants crafted an urban experience that still has relevance 250 years later. We inherited and preserved this landscape and now it is the heart of Nantucket’s tremendous appeal. Today our commercial zoning and its resulting development have no connection to that storied urban tradition. 20 years ago we decided to abandon our traditional legacy, which the Downtown represents, for a misguided ideal – the mainland suburban commercial model. Where Downtown is a remarkable human environment, the Mid-Island area is a glaring example of this late 20th century zoning. The Mid-Island works poorly and looks worse. Streetscapes are non-existent, and automobiles and parking lots dominate. Buildings are scattered, making it unfriendly and dangerous to walk even a short couple of blocks. Yet, walking from Lucky’s Express to Geronimo’s is the same distance as walking from the Sports Locker to Murray’s Toggery. The latter is a rich and rewarding stroll, the former is an exercise in self-preservation. The buildings - islands in a sea of parking - have no hope of connecting to one another. Consequently, where the Downtown offers a supreme social and physical environment, the Mid-Island feels cold and unfriendly. It is time to turn back to our past, to guide the Mid-Island in to the future. The following Area Plan - the first presented under the aegis of the Comprehensive Plan - acknowledges that our history is a vital and relevant guide to our future. Recognizing all that is great about the Downtown, the Plan seeks to emulate the ideals that created it. The Mid- Island will never replace Downtown, but Downtown can point to a better vision of how the Mid-Island should look and importantly how it should work. When this is achieved, the entire Island community - who uses the Mid-Island daily - will benefit, and we will have created some history of our own.” Edward J. Sanford Chairman _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 5 Exhibit 1. 1998 Aerial Photo with Mid-Island Planning Boundary IINN TT RR OO DD UU CC TT II OO NN Background: Inspiration of the Nantucket Comprehensive Community Plan This Area Plan for the Mid-Island Area was inspired by the Nantucket Comprehensive Community Plan (“Comprehensive Plan”) that the Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission (the “Commission”) commenced in 1996, and which was finally ratified by Special Town Meeting on January 8, 2001. The Comprehensive Plan recognized that it could not address detailed strategies for the diversity of neighborhoods and villages that comprise Nantucket. The Plan also realized the value of planning processes that empowered residents to be partners in the development of plans that affect their neighborhoods. This led to a Comprehensive Plan objective to create an Area Planning process. As a means of formulating and implementing Area Plans, the Comprehensive Plan envisioned that representatives of the Commission, the Board of Selectmen, and representatives derived from a broad cross-section of community interests would comprise Work Groups to develop these plans. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 6 Initiation of the Work Group process by the Mid-Island Partnership The Mid-Island Area Plan Work Group (“Mid- Island Work Group”) was initiated by the Mid- Island Partnership (“Partnership”), a large association of businesses located outside the Downtown area. For years, this organization had been concerned with development that lacked focus and continuity in the Mid-Island area. The members of the Partnership felt that the development of a master plan for this area would bring an identity and structure that was lacking. Recognizing the Comprehensive Plan strategy of Area Planning, the Partnership, on May 5, 2001, petitioned the Commission to form the Mid- Island Work Group, which it did on May 7, 2001 (see Appendix “A”). The organizational meeting of the Work Group followed on June 4, 2001. The composition of the Work Group included as many stakeholders as could be identified, and also included members At Large from the community. The Work Group also consisted of a long list of ex officio members that represent professionals from town and regional government, utility companies, businesses, and other Mid-Island organizations that could provide their expertise in the development and implementation of the Plan. At the same time that the Work Group was formed, a Work Program was suggested to guide its actions. The Commission established a boundary for the study area, based on consultations with members of the Mid-Island Partnership. The boundary was extended to encompass the Rotary, 5-corners, the Hospital, and Nantucket High School, because they were all felt to be essential elements or land uses in the Mid-Island area (see Appendix “B”). Planning Process Employed by the Work Group Mission Statement The Work Group met on a bi-monthly basis commencing on June 4, 2001. One of its first tasks was to define its mission: “To produce and recommend implementation of an area plan to guide the future growth and character of the Mid-Island area while considering the needs of residents, businesses, and visitors, by addressing traffic, a pedestrian-friendly environment, affordable housing, improvements for public use, mixed use development, and creating greater efficiency of land use, all in keeping with the traditional character of the island.” Identification of Issues The next task under the Work Program was the identification of issues, which would serve as the basis for Area Plan strategies. The identification of issues took place during two consecutive meetings held on June 19, 2001 and June 26, 2001. To focus the identification of issues, the study area was divided into sub-areas A through G (see Appendix “C”). Issues were thus identified for each sub-area, as well as for the entire area encompassed by the Area Plan boundaries. The issues identified are listed in Appendix “D”. Prioritization of Issues Following the identification of issues, the Commission’s staff led the Work Group on an exercise to prioritize the issues. Each member assigned each issue a high, medium, and low priority value. The sum of the values resulted in a ranking of issues by sub-area, and for the Mid- Island study area as a whole. The scores achieved during this process are listed in Appendix “E”. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 7 Retention of Consultants When the Work Group began its examination of the prioritized issues, it became clear that it would require special expertise in analyzing issues and in forging solutions. The Group concluded it required consultants specializing in traditional neighborhood design and traffic and transportation, but from the perspective that conventional solutions were not the answer to Nantucket’s problems. The Preservation Institute: Nantucket (“PI:N”) volunteered for the role of design consultant, led by Professor Peter Prugh of the University of Florida School of Architecture. The Commission then authorized the issuance of a Request for Proposals (“RFP”) for consulting services for a traffic engineer. Of the three respondents, TND Engineering of Ossipee, New Hampshire, was selected. Its principal, Rick Chellman, was no stranger to Nantucket. He had served as part of the consultant team for the Nantucket Comprehensive Community Plan. Development of the Draft Plan; Public Informational Meetings With the selection of the consultants behind them, the Work Group began the plan development and analysis phase of the Work Program in October of 2001. A series of workshop meetings were conducted with Mr. Prugh and Mr. Chellman leading to several iterations of a concept plan for the Mid –Island, which was further refined at each subsequent workshop meeting. Based on a mailing list of all property owners in the Mid-Island area, notices were sent for several informational meetings, including an Island-wide Public Informational Meeting conducted in the summer of 2002. Appendix “F” reflects the issues raised at this meeting. Each time feedback was received, the Plan was modified to reflect that feedback. What was remarkable about the final public meeting was the apparent broad consensus in support of the Plan. In addition to the meetings mentioned above, there were other meetings held on particular aspects of the Plan with a variety of citizens participating. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 8 Exhibit 2. 1940 Aerial Photo with Mid-Island Planning Boundary. HH II SS TT OO RR YY AA NN DD FF AA CC TT OO RR SS TT HH AA TT II NN FF LL UU EE NN CC EEDD TT HH EE DD EE VV EE LL OO PP MM EE NN TT OO FF MM IIDD -- II SS LL AA NN DD AA RR EE AA Historically, the Mid-Island area was at the fringe of the Old Historic District. South of the dense development patterns representing this historic district were agricultural lands that extended south to the Atlantic Ocean. The Newtown Cemetery, not unlike Nantucket’s other historic cemeteries, was at the fringes of town. In the 1920’s, the early improvements of what would become the Marine Home Center began to take shape. (See Exhibit 2). On the west end of the study area, the historic Cyrus Pierce School, also constructed in the 1920’s, stood nearly alone on Surfside Road. In the 1950’s the Nantucket Cottage Hospital, the Boy’s Club, and the first High School were all constructed in this area. Over the next 25 years, more commercial uses appeared incrementally. The Finast was built in 1960, the Post Office Pleasant Street office opened in 1976, the Nantucket Bank main office opened in 1979, the Elementary School opened in 1979, and the fire station in 1980. The area south and southeast of this new commercial district began to develop as housing for an expanding year-round community. The road system that traversed this area was, and still is, the crossroads between the east and west ends of the Island, and that became a major factor driving the development of this area. Finally with the new High School/ Middle School complex completed in 1990, the Mid- Island area was firmly established as a center for _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 9 essential town services, and for civic, governmental, and commercial functions. The Influence of Zoning Exhibit 3. 1972 Zoning Map In 1972, the first zoning bylaw was established on the Island, with most of the area encompassing the study area designated as the Residential-Commercial (RC) District – the same as downtown (see Exhibit 3). It is interesting to note that the RC zone runs from downtown along Orange and Washington Streets out to the Mid-Island area. With the Finast and Marine Lumber Company in existence, the thinking at the time of implementation, according to those who were instrumental in establishing these districts, was to adopt zoning that would serve to replicate the character of Downtown. In the early 1980’s two major changes were made to the RC district. One was to greatly increase the parking requirement, based on a mainland suburban shopping mall standard. Secondly 30% of any commercial lot was to remain as green space. These two changes have proven to be significant impediments to replicating any of the pedestrian features of downtown. Therefore the RC zone became a poor guide for the development of both the Downtown and the Mid-Island Area. Today, the zoning in the Mid-Island area remains substantially the same. Exhibit 4. Current Zoning Map The RC zone has failed to create the kind of unified center that the historic downtown of Nantucket represents. Zoning failed to encourage the integration of land uses and parking. The RC zone also failed to create uniformity of architecture, form, and design, resulting in a hodgepodge of buildings, variable setbacks, and parking areas. Most importantly, this zoning failed to replicate the shared parking and pedestrian theme that is at the heart of Downtown. The loss of public infrastructure adds to this failure by not providing a consistent theme or unifying element. The Commons - a Major Commercial Development - was an attempt to develop a large-scale mixed-use development with a unified theme in keeping with Nantucket’s traditional character. However, driven by the parking and circulation standards and the green space requirements of the Zoning Bylaw, the development became a slave to auto-dependency. Most of this development is characterized by broad expanses of parking and access roads, isolating the buildings from each other. Efforts were made to control the materials used in laying out roads and parking, but the overall result is, if not in appearance, but in function, a somewhat conventional strip commercial center. The result of this and other incremental development is a disjointed Mid-Island area that is largely influenced and controlled by the automobile. It is very difficult to park in one spot and to walk to several businesses. Driving from _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 10 business to business - maybe a total of one block - is common practice. All of this occurs in an area no larger than the historic downtown. The Influence of Property Values, the Economy and Related Development Trends The Mid-Island area is a highly desirable place to continue this trend of mixed-use development. The price of land in the Mid-Island area remains considerably lower than prices both in the Downtown, and in the more rural areas of the Island. This has resulted in the areas encompassed by Fairgrounds Road on the east and Hummock Pond Road on the north and west being developed principally as housing for the year-round community. At the same time, prices in the Downtown, influenced by the Beinecke vision and downtown renaissance, have made it more of an upscale seasonal retail and service center, rather than a center that serves the year-round community. This disparity in pricing has led to the creation of the retail and service center in the Mid-Island area that increasingly serves the basic needs of the year-round community. By Commission estimates, the Mid-Island area has approximately 200,000 square feet of commercial space, generating approximately 660 peak season jobs, 8% of the number of peak- season jobs Island-wide. These statistics underscore the importance of this area to the Island-wide economy. If more development is inevitable, a plan is essential to better guide that development in a context more suitable to Nantucket’s character. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 11 Exhibit 5. Map of Collector and Local Roads Traffic Issues and Patterns in the Mid-Island area: The Crossroads of the Island Roads / Intersections The Mid-Island Area was earlier referred to as the “Crossroads of Nantucket”. This is an apt descriptor, when we consider the following facts about the roadway system in the Mid-Island Area (See Exhibit 5): 1. Lower Orange Street, which traverses the east and northeast fringe of the study area, is a major rural collector and the principal truck and general traffic route from the Steamship Dock to destinations in the Mid-Island Area, to ‘Sconset, and to the Old South Road and Airport commercial and industrial areas. This is primarily a heavy commercial corridor, with auto services, lumberyards, and general retail uses. During peak periods, Lower Orange Street has 10,678 ADT (Average Daily Traffic) of traffic flow. 2. Sparks Avenue and Prospect Street are also major rural collectors, and serve to link the east and west portions of the Island. Sparks Avenue is primarily a commercial corridor, with auto service, restaurant, and grocery land uses. The Boys and Girls Club and an entrance to the High School is also on this street. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 12 Sparks Avenue generates an ADT of 10,678 during peak periods. 3. Surfside Road is a minor rural collector and the main thoroughfare for south beach destinations, neighborhoods, schools, and businesses in the central and south-central parts of the Island. Surfside Road, at the Schools, generates an ADT of 12,858 during peak periods. 4. Vesper Lane is a minor rural collector, and links Surfside Road to Hummock Pond Road. This is primarily a residential corridor; however, the Cottage Hospital and Holdgate’s Laundry abut this street at the Surfside Road intersection. 5. Pleasant Street is a local street, with mostly retail / light commercial land uses along the section of the corridor within the study area. Pleasant Street generates an ADT of 10,420 during peak periods. 6. 4 Corners (the intersection of Sparks Avenue / Surfside Road / Atlantic Avenue / Prospect Street) links major thoroughfares connecting to the Downtown, the west end of the Island, and the south end of the Island, and the east end and Mid-Island area. 7. The Hooper Farm Road intersection at Sparks and Pleasant Streets links neighborhoods to the south of the study area with the Mid-Island commercial district, as well as to collector streets that link traffic to other island destinations. 8. The 5 Corners intersection represents the convergence of roads from all compass directions. All roads intersecting are two- way, except York Street, which is one of two one-way pairs (Dover being the other) that has become a major thoroughfare principally for passenger vehicle traffic and transit buses between the Downtown and the Hospital and Schools, and destinations on the west end of the Island. Significant queuing occurs during peak periods, particularly on Pleasant Street, approaching the intersection from the south, where parking at Fahey and Fromagerie compounds the problem by impeding two-way traffic flow. Yet, the intersection works remarkably well with existing stop sign control. 9. The Hooper Farm / Sparks / Pleasant and 4 Corners intersections have serious operational deficiencies. Those deficiencies include offsets of intersecting roads that compound the number of movements that drivers need to make at an intersection resulting in increased delays. Pedestrian and Bicycle Systems Exhibit 6. Map of Bike Path and Sidewalk System Pedestrian systems in the Mid-Island area are disjointed at best, with significant gaps at important locations (see Exhibit 6). This leaves pedestrians to forge paths along grassy road shoulders, or, more seriously, to share the roads with automobile and truck traffic. Notably: 1. No sidewalks serve the Hospital, although it is a mere 300 feet from the nearest shuttle stop and sidewalk. 2. There are no sidewalks from Fahey and Fromagerie to the Boys and Girls Club playing fields. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 13 3. The Surfside Road Bike Path and the Milestone Road Path, serving ‘Sconset and Polpis, are not linked through the Mid-Island Area. 4. Further to the west, the Madaket Road Bike Path begins, with no formal pedestrian or bicycle link to the Mid- Island Area. 5. Pedestrian crossings are rare, with several at the Stop & Shop; one at the Post Office; one at the Marine Home Center; one at Surfside Road and Vesper Lane; and one at the Boys and Girls Club. All of these crossings are across two lanes of traffic. 6. Except for the crossing at the Boys and Girls Club, which is intermittently manned by a police presence, pedestrians must rely on the often infrequent courtesy of drivers to yield to them. Except for some rumble strips at the Boys and Girls Club crossing, there are no traffic calming devices to slow the speed of traffic. As a result, the area is very pedestrian unfriendly and people seek their cars as refuge for even the shortest trip of a block or so. Parking Systems Exhibit 7. Map of Parking Lot Locations Location Number of Off- Street Parking Spaces The Commons 218 Nantucket Bank 43 Pacific Bank 18 Stop and Shop 146 Marine Home Center 67 Sanford Boat Yard 151 Boys and Girls Club 41 Hospital 168 Other Commercial Uses 349 Total 1197 Table 1. Table of Mid-Island Parking Inventory Most of the parking in the Mid-Island Area has been driven by the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw. Out of the entire study area, the only on- street parking legally permitted is at Fahey & Fromagerie. Off-Street parking in the study area serving commercial or mixed-use establishments for customer or employee use consists of about 988 parking spaces, while the Hospital has 168 spaces; and the Boys and Girls Club has 41 spaces (see Exhibit 7 and Table 1). This count does not include boat storage areas or motor vehicle storage at automobile repair shops. The zoning bylaw contains parking requirements that apply to a variety of uses in this area (See table in Appendix G). What currently characterizes parking in the Mid- Island area is its disjointed nature. With few exceptions, parking is provided on a property- by-property basis, with access and circulation self-contained within that property. This leads to inefficient development patterns, multiple curb cuts along busy roads, isolated buildings, and therefore an unfriendly pedestrian environment. Visually, cars and asphalt, not buildings and trees, dominate the landscape. The Bylaw contains no formal provision for shared parking, although the Zoning Board of Appeals has allowed shared parking in limited instances. This piecemeal approach to parking _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 14 has led to larger expanses of paved areas than would otherwise be necessary, a more automobile- dependent pattern than if parking were shared and interconnected, and a decidedly un-Nantucket like appearance. Those accessing services in the area often drive from destination to destination, in part because of the lack of linkage, but also because it is perceived that being a pedestrian is either unsafe or is extremely inconvenient. Exhibit 8. Downtown pattern overlaid onto the Mid- Island Yet, in its downtown counterpart, pedestrians think nothing of parking on one end of the downtown district, and walking the equivalent distance of one end of the Mid-Island area to the other, and then returning to their cars (see Exhibit 8). Transit Exhibit 9. NRTA Island-wide Shuttle System The existing shuttle system was originally designed to relieve the congestion and parking difficulties in the downtown area. Therefore the focus of the existing routes and schedules is designed with the downtown area as “The” destination. While the NRTA has done an outstanding job of getting employees and patrons to the downtown area, the needs of the Island have changed since the NRTA’s inception. The Mid-Island area has become a major destination point for a growing number of Islanders and summer residents. Consequently, to meet the transit needs of the Mid-Island, it is essential for NRTA to consider the area as an important destination point when determining routes and schedules. Exhibit 10. Map of Shuttle Routes through the Mid- Island Area The Island’s seasonal transportation system, the Nantucket Regional Transit Authority (NRTA), serves the Mid-Island area in the following manner (see Exhibit 10): 1. The Mid-Island Loop serves 5-Corners, 4 Corners, Surfside Road, Hooper Farm / Sparks Ave. / Pleasant St.; the Rotary, Lower Orange Street, Dave St., and Pleasant Street. 2. The Miacomet Loop serves Orange St., the Rotary, 5 Corners on its outgoing trip from Downtown, and 5-Corners traveling inbound to Downtown. The Miacomet Loop serves the Bartlett Rd. area where _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 15 there are a large number of employee housing units. The difficulty for the Mid- Island employers is that the current route takes the employees into town and then out again before serving the Mid-Island area. 3. The Madaket Loop does not traverse the Mid-Island area, and falls about ¼ mile short of a link with the Miacomet Loop at Milk Street / Prospect Street. The Miacomet Loop will then take riders into town before serving the Mid-Island area. At present the Madaket Route does not serve the Mid-Island area at all. 4. The ‘Sconset Routes serve Lower Orange Street both outbound and inbound to Downtown. Thus, the Sconset Routes do not provide direct service to Mid-Island commercial areas, including the Stop & Shop. No single stop links all transit systems to the Mid-Island area, although the stops at Landmark House serve all buses except Madaket. There is currently no unifying infrastructure in place to accommodate transit passengers or to address the role of the Mid-Island as a “Crossroads of Nantucket”. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 16 Exhibit 11. Map of the Plan AADD DD RR EE SS SS II NN GG CC HH AA RR AA CC TT EE RR AA NN DD TT RR AA NN SSPP OO RR TT AA TT II OO NN II SS SS UU EE SS :: ““GG OO II NN GG BB AA CC KK TT OO TT RR AA DD II TT II OO NN AA LL PP AA TT TT EE RR NN SS ”” The illustration above is the proposed Mid-Island Area Plan that addresses all the issues identified during the first summer of the planning process, and further discussed in the foregoing narrative (also see Appendix I). The Plan proposes a multi-faceted strategy that is modeled on the character and success of the Downtown to guide the future of the Mid-Island, to the extent that these objectives can be accomplished considering existing public and private development patterns. The overall purpose of the Plan is to establish an identity and coherence for the Mid-Island area with: 1. Careful control of infill development; through investment in a unifying public infrastructure; 2. Retrofit of some public and private development to achieve greater efficiency and cohesiveness; 3. And siting of future governmental facilities that can better serve Island-wide needs if located in the Mid-Island area. Infill Strategy/Design Guidelines The Plan map depicts, for illustrative purposes, how a directed infill strategy can create on Pleasant Street, for want of a better term, a “main street” appearance that establishes a pattern of building along the street line, fronted by a pedestrian system. Parking would be located in interconnected lots to the rear of structures, but also supplemented on Pleasant Street, and certain side streets, through the introduction of on-street parking. Housing on upper floors will be encouraged, _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 17 contributing to the trend already established there. For purposes of this Plan the term “infill” means not only new structures and uses, but also additions to existing uses, and the redevelopment of existing sites. The overall effect should not be dissimilar to the Downtown in many respects – mixed use structures (commercial and housing) sited close to streets; broad sidewalks to welcome pedestrians; parking on the street, with supplemental parking tucked away behind structures; and modest public spaces (pocket parks) as a refuge for pedestrians. Establishing an infill strategy must include careful control of the design aspects of future development. Design guidelines are recommended to further create a common theme to guide development, beyond the site-by-site review that is now conducted by the Planning Board, the Zoning Board, and by the Historic District Commission, and by the Zoning Enforcement Officer. Transportation Strategy The overall philosophy of the recommended transportation elements of this Plan is to create a traffic and pedestrian system that is more in keeping with traditional Nantucket development and road patterns. This objective, however, is tempered by the realization that ignoring the more auto-dependent nature of existing uses and patterns is completely impractical. What this Plan therefore attempts to do is to strike a careful balance by providing reasonable and convenient parking needs, while at the same time recommending improvements designed to reduce auto-dependency by providing safe and convenient alternative transportation modes designed to make the Mid-Island area more accessible by transit, by foot, and by bike. As the Mid-Island area is developed over time, it is envisioned that the public using facilities in this area will be inspired to leave their cars behind because improved facilities will provide more convenience and a better quality experience. We do not have to go far to find a successful model for this vision – it is Nantucket’s downtown. The downtown has a successful system of on-street parking, easy shuttle access, and pedestrian-friendly environment that is an appropriate model for the Mid-Island. In good measure, its success can be linked to a walkable, pedestrian scale of development that is dominated by lively pedestrian activity, and not by automobiles. Interestingly enough, the business area under study is almost exactly the same size as downtown. Exhibit 12. Recommended Traffic Flow Re-examining street directional patterns Part of the success of the Downtown is linked to a road system that is relatively narrow with on- street parking; and has low traffic speeds. In examining the traffic patterns in the Mid-Island area, it is soon obvious that the opposite situation exists – two-way traffic patterns dominate; sidewalks are intermittent and pedestrian crossings are few. Traffic speeds are excessive throughout much of the area. However, maintaining the function of major collector roads needs to be considered in devising any Plan. The Plan therefore acknowledges that Sparks Avenue and Orange Street will need to remain two-way streets to function as the Island’s major collector roads. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 18 It also recognizes that Pleasant Street is less important as a two-way street, and, in fact, if converted to one way from Hooper Farm Road to 5-Corners, can create significant benefits in meeting important objectives of the Mid-Island Plan, not the least of which include: 1. Removing traffic conflicts; 2. Enhancing traffic flow; 3. Reducing traffic speeds; 4. Providing considerable on-street parking; and 5. Creating a safer and more pleasant environment for pedestrians. Establishing Pleasant Street one-way from Williams Lane to 5 Corners also: 1. Removes the parking conflict at Fahey and Fromagerie; 2. Provides within the limited Right-of-Way parking on one side; and 3. Provides a sidewalk on one side. The Plan also recommends that direction of streets interconnecting Pleasant Street and Orange Street be readjusted in recognition of the one-way direction of Pleasant Street (see figure 12 and Appendix J). Similarly, the system of streets interconnecting Pleasant Street with Sparks Avenue has been reexamined as well, with the recommendation that a new two-way street, referred to as Craig Street in this study, to be constructed to enhance traffic circulation. Fixing key intersections to deal with congestion and enhance traffic flow and safety Exhibit 13. Hooper Farm/Sparks Intersection Realignment Exhibit 14. Four Corner Intersection Realignment The Plan proposes that key intersections be improved to enhance their operation, and therefore improve their safety, and help relieve congestion. This can be accomplished both with the Sparks / Hooper Farm / Pleasant Street (see Exhibit 13) and the Sparks / Atlantic / Surfside / Prospect (see Exhibit 14) intersections by a simple 4-way realignment at 90 degree angles. This is not easy to accomplish, because both intersections require acquisitions of property, and, in one case, the movement of a residence. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 19 Exhibit 15. Hooper Farm/Sparks Intersection, Long- term Another long-term goal for the Hooper Farm / Sparks / Pleasant Street intersection is the creation of a small roundabout in lieu of the 4- way realignment (see Exhibit 14). The Plan also recommends the conversion of the Milestone Rotary into a more conventional roundabout. This improvement would enhance safety by eliminating the dangerous combination of higher speed through-traffic in conflict with lower speed traffic circling within the Rotary. The roundabout ensures that all traffic enters under a yield situation at deflected entry points. Creating on-street parking Exhibit 16. On-Street Parking Plan As addressed earlier, the Plan calls for the creation of on-street parking on Pleasant Street and certain side streets. Commission staff estimates that approximately 200 new off-street parking spaces could be created in this manner – about 40 between Williams Lane and 5-Corners, and approximately 160 between Williams Lane and Hooper Farm Road / Sparks Avenue, and an un-quantified number on side streets. (see Exhibit 16). Creating common parking Creating common parking, connectivity between building lots, and reduced numbers of driveway cuts all requires a new approach under zoning that offers incentives for implementing these efficiencies. The Plan, through the creation of interconnecting lots, through the redevelopment or restructuring of existing parking lots, and through the addition of new lots, will yield between about 170 and 200 new off-street parking spaces in the study area, adding to the 1197 existing off-street parking spaces, and increasing the off-street parking supply by about 15% (see Exhibit 12). The resulting increase to the total parking supply in the area, with the additional on-street and off- street parking, would be about 32%. Creating pedestrian systems Creating a safe and pleasant environment for pedestrians is crucial to the success of this Plan. Consequently, the plan recommends that: 1. All pedestrian “gaps” in infrastructure be filled throughout the study area; 2. a system of brick sidewalks be established the length of Pleasant Street; 3. Frequent and clearly defined pedestrian crossings be established, especially along Pleasant Street and Sparks Avenue; and, 4. Pedestrian plazas or other spaces, public and private, be established to provide _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 20 refuges for pedestrians within the study area. Accommodating Bicycles 1. The Plan recommends the creation of a bike path from the south side of Sparks Avenue connecting the Surfside Path with the Milestone Path at the Rotary. Because of right-of-way constraints, this path may not meet the width requirements of standard bike paths in other sections of the Island. 2. Downtown to the Milestone Rotary – the co-called In-Town Bike Path. Because the selection of the route is difficult due to environmental and ROW constraints, the Plan is non-specific as to how that will be accomplished, yielding to the alternatives review and design process to make that determination. 3. Sparks Avenue through the School property to Backus Lane and Surfside Road, thus connecting all the Schools and Nantucket Ice with Sparks Avenue and the Boys and Girls Club. 4. Prospect Street Sidewalk / Bikeway, and Vesper Lane Sidewalk, which will create pedestrian and bicycle linkages to the Madaket Bike Path and to the future Hummock Pond Road Bike Path. 5. The Plan calls for the creation of additional bicycle racks throughout the Mid-Island area, associated with each parking lot, each pedestrian plaza, and with NRTA stops, in order to foster convenient use, and inter-modal linkages. Enhancing NRTA Service to the Mid-Island Because the NRTA currently services the Mid- Island area with several stops, a central stop for NRTA buses is proposed in conjunction with recommended changes to the shuttle system routes that provide a direct link between areas throughout the Island served by the shuttle. These changes will enhance opportunities for the substantial working population to take transit to their jobs during the peak summer period – the period with the highest customer traffic demand. Thus, this enhancement to the NRTA is essential to reducing auto-dependency and related congestion in the Mid-Island area. Achieving enhanced service may require changes in some routes, and perhaps a change in the direction of another route. In many cases, education about the proximity of stops to the Mid-Island area will be necessary, and providing pedestrian system improvements will help. Adjusting the Madaket Route to serve the Mid- Island Area may require diverting the return trip of the bus down Quaker Lane, Prospect Street, West York, and thus onto Washington and Easy Street to the point of departure at the NHA on Broad Street. If this is done, it presents the opportunity for a connection via a transfer pass to the Mid-Island Loop to connect to Mid-Island destinations. The use of transfer passes and the promotion of connecting routes through a future centralized facility in the Mid-Island area could provide more widespread use of the NRTA by the traveling public. The recommended strategies of this Plan include specific suggestions as to how the Miacomet Loop, the ‘Sconset Routes, and the Madaket Route might be adjusted to better serve the Mid-Island Area. Public Amenities: Creating a Sense of Arrival and a Pedestrian Focus The Plan proposes that the intersection improvements at Hooper Farm Road and Pleasant Street / Sparks Avenue incorporate a landscape element creating a gateway into the Mid-Island Area. Similarly, both private and public plazas within the study area will create focal points for public gathering, creating the same effect of Town Greens - places of assembly, community activities, celebration, and leisure activities. These areas complement, and are essential parts of, traditional downtowns that enhance livability and commercial activity. The Craig Property: A Diversity of Public Benefit Opportunities _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 21 The Mid-Island work group would be remiss if it did not consider the potential public benefits of the undeveloped parcel of land under the control of the Craig family (the “Craig property”. It is one of few relatively large, vacant parcels in the Mid-Island area. Its proximity to major public facilities, such as the Schools and to the Boys and Girls Club, and its strategic and convenient location in the central part of the Island to service a variety of community needs cannot be overlooked. The Work Group believes that the Town or non- profits should give serious consideration to the acquisition of the Craig property to serve a public purpose. But the Work Group feels that the decision concerning the possible acquisition of this property and concerning its ultimate use, were well beyond its charge. The purpose of this Plan is to provide guidance as to the future development of the area. Throughout much of the study area, in-fill development is the obvious future growth that the Group needed to focus on. The Craig property is different; it is vacant, and the possibilities and development options are numerous. The Work Group therefore felt that the best way that it can give guidance to the Town or to non-profits engaged in public or quasi-public services was to present a series of possible development scenarios. They are as follows: a. Alternative “A”: Expansion of Boys and Girls Club The Nantucket Boys and Girls Club has maintained an interest in the acquisition of the Craig property for many years for the expansion of the boys and girls Club. The Club’s plans include both the construction of a gymnasium and of additional playing fields. The current thinking is to construct the gymnasium as an addition on the west side of the current facility, and the playing field on the east, within the Craig property. The alternative “A” schematic depicts how the Craig property can accommodate playing fields. The alternative also includes the central NRTA stop along Sanford Road that is referred to in the NRTA section of this Plan. b. Alternative “B”: Playing Fields and Performing Arts / Community Center The Comprehensive Community Plan articulated the need for a central facility to encompass the needs of the arts community – a so-called Performing Arts Center. The Work Group believes that the Craig property is an appropriate site for this function. It is close to the High School, which currently serves a variety of community needs, including some of the needs of the arts community. But the High School is over-utilized, and, because of the intense demand for its use, compounded by budget limitations, it no longer adequately meets the diverse governmental, recreational, social, and cultural needs of the community. The Town needs more _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 22 dedicated meeting space for daytime meetings, as school facilities are not available until 4:00 PM, and because of budget constraints, close at 9 PM. Currently the only other space is at the Land Bank Meeting Room, and the Washington Street Annex, both with limited capacity. After 2003 the private performing arts community will no longer have the Bennett Hall theatre for staged performances. Clearly there is a great need for a new facility to house all these needs. Providing that facility near the High School and Boys and Girls Club makes a great deal of sense. Alternative “B” recognizes the fact that the property is more than is necessary to meet the needs of a community and performing arts center. It includes the NRTA stop, as in Alternative “A”, but also illustrates its capacity to meet some of the expansion needs of the Boys and Girls Club. This is an ideal scenario, because it provides economies of scale that can enhance the financial viability of facilities that meet the needs of the Town, the cultural community, and the Boys and Girls Club. c. Alternative “C”: Commercial/Residential Development Although the least preferred alternative, Alternative “C” is put forward to illustrate how the Work Group believes the property should be developed if it is developed commercially. It promotes the same style and pattern of development as occurs along Pleasant Street. It assumes commercial space on the lower levels, and housing on the upper. The NRTA stop is proposed as in the first two alternatives. Fire Station The Mid-island Area is a strategic site for a variety of essential Town and other public services because of its geographic location relative to the rest of the island. It is therefore no accident that the Island’s hospital, schools, and the fire station are located within this small geographic area. The system of roads connecting to all parts of the Island is a major reason. The fire station is located on a relatively small parcel of land. It became obvious to the Work Group, early in its examination of issues, that the current site, juxtaposed as it is with the Stop & Shop site, cannot meet the future needs of the island within the confines of this limited site. Because the Work Group concluded it is in the best interest of the town that the Stop & Shop remain on its site, rather than move elsewhere (See section of this Plan on the Stop & Shop), the Work Group believes that it is important for the Town to consider an alternative site somewhere within the Mid-Island area, but not necessarily within the study limits of this Plan. And because the site options are limited and threatened in part by private development, we are recommending that the Board of Selectmen immediately begin examining the future needs of the Fire Department, and possible future site options. Stop & Stop The Plan emphasizes that the retention of the Stop & Shop at its current location is essential to maintaining the vibrancy and success of the Mid- Island Area. Successful commercial areas rely on both transit and commercial anchor facilities to generate further activity in that area. The Stop & Shop is that essential commercial anchor in the Mid-Island area. Representatives of the Stop & Shop have been active participants in, and supporters of, the Mid- _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 23 Island planning process. Their needs at the present include enhancement of the warehousing capabilities of their facility, and the need to bring the layout of its produce areas up to current standards. Another need that is evident is the need to enhance parking capacity, and to resolve circulation and congestion problems that often spill over onto surrounding streets. The Work Group is cognizant that if the Stop & Shop would develop its prototypical “Super Stop & Shop” facility on Nantucket, that facility would have a negative effect on the viability of small businesses in the Mid-Island area. Stop & Shop has assured the Work Group that this is not their intent at this location. The Planning Board has considerable discretion under the Major Commercial Development (MCD) Special Permit provisions of the Zoning Bylaw to place controls and conditions that will ensure that the stated intent of the Stop & Shop is carefully adhered to. In order to accomplish these enhancements to its facility, the Stop and Shop has limited opportunities if it is to remain on this site. The only viable option for expansion of parking is onto property occupied by the Nantucket Fire Department facility (see Fire Department above). That circumstance, coupled with the need for an alternative Fire station site somewhere in the Mid-Island Area, offers the potential for an interesting round of benefits for the Town and for the Stop & Shop. The Fire Station site also offers further infill development potential that can enhance that can enhance the revenue that can be leveraged to produce a new fire station. And there are few places for this to occur, most of them on or near Old South Road. The Stop & Shop should also consider the provision of employee housing on the upper level of its expanded area, consistent with the overall objective of providing affordable resident and employee housing in the Mid-Island area. This Plan also recommends that, as part of its enhancements, Stop & Shop should explore the creation of a home shopping service similar to the “Peapod” service it established in the Boston Area, provided that the space need requirements of such a service can be met on this site. This service would be in line with the objective of reducing auto-dependency in the Mid-Island area. The Post Office The U.S. Postal Service has put on hold its plans to build new facilities nationwide. This stemmed an effort commenced three years ago to find a suitable site for an expanded Post Office facility to replace the grossly deficient facility on Pleasant Street. Although it considered an expanded facility generally at its present location, the most recent plan called for it adjoining, and integrated with, the Pacific Bank facility near the intersection of Pleasant Street and Sparks Avenue. This Plan strongly endorses the location of the postal facility in the Mid- Island study area, and considers that facility one of those essential anchors to the Mid-Island area. As with the Stop & Shop, the location of the postal facility outside this area would also establish a major traffic generator in isolation from an established center of activity, thus continuing a pattern of strip commercial development. The Commons Although the Plan acknowledges the existence of the Commons, it has little to recommend in the way of changes or enhancements, except perhaps the consideration of the acceptance of the main thoroughfare by the Town. This recommendation is made only in acknowledgement of the fact that this thoroughfare is used increasingly frequently as a connector between Pleasant Street and Orange Street. The “street”, however, falls far short of meeting Town road standards, and does not comply with minimum curve radii standards, and has extensive head-in parking along the road. However, it is important to try to further integrate the Commons into the Mid-Island area, especially to Pleasant Street, in a more traditional manner. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 24 Orange Street and the Marine Home Center The Plan also has little to offer as a resolution of the traffic congestion at the Marine Home Center, as long as that facility exists at its current location. The use is a high traffic generator, and has limited head-in parking, and limited queuing at multiple access points. This situation also makes it largely impossible to locate bicycle or pedestrian facilities on that side of the street. If the site were to become less industrial (moving the lumber yard), it could become the crowning jewel in the Mid-Island area. With its intimate proximity to the harbor this site is ideally suited to become a mixed-use site, with residential, commercial, and public open spaces looking out to the harbor. By opening the site to some vistas of the harbor, the Mid-Island area would gain an important visual connection to Nantucket Harbor. Implementation Implementation of the Plan will certainly not occur overnight. The Plan is intended to be long- range to guide the actions of the Town and the private entities located in the Mid-Island Area over the next 20 to 25 years. However, certain critical actions should commence immediately – such as the creation of the Mid-Island Design Overlay District, to guide the future development of the area. This will ensure that incremental changes will be in accordance with the Mid- Island Plan. The Town should also begin to engage in the process of designing and implementing pedestrian improvements through inclusion in the town’s multi-year capital improvements program. And it needs to begin designing key elements of the Plan that require no further study – such as the 4-Corners intersection improvements, the Milestone Rotary improvements, and the Hooper Farm Road / Sparks Avenue / Pleasant Street intersection improvements, so that these projects can be “ready to go” when funding is allocated. State and Federal funds should be sought for their construction. Further study is needed before directional changes in the street system are made, so improvements that are reliant on these changes will be more long term. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 25 Exhibit 17. Map of Plan in Stop & Shop Vicinity TT HH EE PP LL AA NN :: SSHH OO RR TT -- AA NN DD LL OO NN GG --TT EE RR MM OO BB JJ EE CC TT II VV EESS The following are the detailed recommendations and strategies of the Mid-Island Area Plan: Land Use Create a Mid-Island Design Overlay District (MIDOD) superimposed over existing zoning districts as a means of establishing special design and dimensional standards appropriate exclusively for the Mid-Island Area. Within that District, incorporate the following, at a minimum: 1. Establish Design Guidelines to guide in- fill development, expansions, and redevelopment of the Mid-Island Area. (Planning Board) 2. Provide that new or expanded primary buildings within the study area be placed at, or in proximity to, the street line to give a “street presence” to buildings, and to emphasize their pedestrian orientation. (Planning Board, HDC) 3. Provide a mechanism for shared parking and access, with all parking, except extreme exceptions, being located in the rear of buildings. (Planning Board, HDC) 4. Open space should be focused as gathering places for social interaction or practical uses such as well-designed bus stops and bicycles racks. These areas should be integrated into the daily flow _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 26 of pedestrian movement and be sizeable enough for use by a minimum of ___ people. Green space should be achieved by planting significantly sized trees and individual small plantings, like flower boxes, near buildings like flower boxes. It is very important to keep buildings connected to pedestrians via unobstructed sidewalks, just like Downtown. Small pocket parks should also be incorporated throughout the area. (Planning Board, Board of Selectmen, Business Owners) 5. Encourage housing in all buildings by providing incentives to property owners, especially if they offer housing meeting the needs of households earning 80% of the island median income. (Planning Board) 6. Establish “collective” or “shared” parking requirement for use in the Mid- Island Area, allowing property owners to meet the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw off-site. Provide for possible waivers of the strict application of these new parking requirements if use with seasonal demand employs NRTA incentives for employees and customers, and engages in marketing program urging use of transit and other alternatives to the automobile. (Planning Board) 7. Strengthen the Site Plan review requirements of the Zoning Bylaw for uses that are located within the Overlay District. (Planning Board) 8. Establish an “Institutional” Zoning District or Overlay District encompassing the Hospital, Schools, and Boys and Girls Club complex, with standards tailored to those institutions. (Planning Board, Town Meeting) 9. Establish a program of planting trees and / or installing fences on vacant lots in the Mid-Island area, until the lots are developed. The purpose is to provide an aesthetic streetscape interface until development occurs. (Property and business owners) 10. The Town, either alone or in conjunction with the Boys and Girls Club and other non-profits, should acquire the Craig property for a variety of potential public uses, including its potential for a consolidated Mid-Island transit stop; employee housing; parkland, community and meeting center expansion; Boys and Girls Club playing fields expansion; and/or a performing arts center. (Board of Selectmen / Town Meeting) 11. At such time that the U. S. Postal Service relocates and expands its Mid-Island Post Office, strongly encourage the Postal Service to locate that facility within the Mid-Island planning area. (U.S.P.S.) 12. Consider amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning from residential to commercial for lots situated on the south side of Sparks Avenue, between Hooper Farm Road and the I&M. (Planning Board) Housing 1. Encourage mixed-use development throughout the study area, particularly the provision of employee housing on the upper levels of commercial establishments, including above an expanded area of the Stop & Shop. (Planning Board) 2. In residential zones, encourage in-fill of residences (including secondary dwellings) as housing for year-round community, or for seasonal employees. (Business and Property Owners) 3. Consider expansion of the Multi-family Overlay District within portions of the study area. (Planning Board) 4. Provide on-premises employee housing associated with the institutions located within the study area. (Business and Property Owners, Planning Board) 5. Permit expansion of existing dormitories through the design, density, and property management controls found within the “Neighborhood Employee Housing Overlay District” provisions of the Zoning Bylaw. (Planning Board) _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 27 Traffic / Transportation Streets, Intersections, and Pedestrian Improvements A. For Immediate Implementation 1. Objectives for all improvements in the Mid-Island Area should include enhancing traffic flow; reducing conflicts between motor vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists; increasing safety; enhancing emergency access; and making the Mid- Island Area more pedestrian-friendly. (All entities) 2. Establish short-range and long-range capital program to upgrade existing sidewalks, where necessary, and install new sidewalks throughout the study area where they are now lacking, including through The Commons (Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee) 3. Add more pedestrian crossings (such as on Pleasant Street, near Nantucket Office Products) and at these crossings implement reduced speed limits and traffic calming measures, shorter lengths of crossings, and better-defined crossings. 4. Provide pedestrian access and connections between existing and future parking areas. (Planning Board and property and business owners) 5. Integrate sidewalks and streetscape amenities, especially at the interface between structures and sidewalks along streets. (Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Property and Business Owners) 6. Provide “green spaces”, or mini-parks for pedestrians at key locations within the Mid-Island area. (Board of Selectmen) 7. Reconstruct the Milestone Rotary as a modern roundabout. (Board of Selectmen) 8. Improve the intersection of Hooper Farm Road, Pleasant Street, and Sparks Avenue by creating a 4-way alignment of the intersecting roads, or potentially would implement a mini-roundabout design. (Board of Selectmen) 9. Improve the intersection of Sparks Avenue, Atlantic Avenue, and Prospect Street by creating a 4-way alignment of the intersecting roads. (Board of Selectmen) 10. Retain two-way traffic flows on Sparks Avenue as a main collector connecting downtown and the western part of the Island. (Board of Selectmen) 11. Make Sanford Road a Town Road by acquiring title to the right-of-way of this abutter’s road; improve further as a two- lane road. (Board of Selectmen) 12. Create a more formal pedestrian connection from Chin’s Way and Orange Street through the Foods parking area. (Board of Selectmen) 13. Leave West Creek Road two-way, but improve head-in parking to alleviate conflicts with through traffic. (Board of Selectmen) 14. Improve the intersection alignment of Williams Lane and Pleasant Street, whether or not Pleasant Street becomes a one-way road. (Board of Selectmen) 15. Make sight line adjustments to Cherry Street at its intersection with Pleasant Street. (Board of Selectmen) 16. Provide a pedestrian connection to the Commons from Pleasant Street through the former railroad right-of-way owned by the Town. (Board of Selectmen) 17. Explore the feasibility of establishing home delivery services (i.e., Stop & Shop “Peapod” service) as a means of reducing parking demand, provided that the site can accommodate the warehouse space necessary to support this service (Stop & Shop) B. For Longer Term Implementation 1. Conduct a study of the implications of changing traffic patterns as recommended within this Area Plan. This study should include examination of the impact of these actions on key intersections located _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 28 outside the study area; increases of traffic on abutting roads, through origin/destination studies; and traffic calming measures that can be implemented broadly throughout the Mid-Island area and in key areas outside the study area (i.e., Surfside Road, Fairgrounds Road, Old South Road, etc.) Do the following only after this analysis has been completed, and the Board of Selectmen considers its recommendations: a. Re-examine and modify street directions as needed within the Area Plan study area. b. Establish Pleasant Street as a one- way street between Sparks Avenue and 5-Corners; provide sidewalks and parking along both sides of the street. (Board of Selectmen) c. Reverse the direction of Bear Street to run towards Orange Street. (Board of Selectmen) d. Reverse the direction of Williams Street, except for the section fronting on Cumberland Farms and its off- street parking area, which should be two-way to enhance access from Orange Street. Abandon diagonal parking along the side of the Cumberland Farms to accommodate two-way traffic flow. (Board of Selectmen) e. Make Cherry Street one-way towards Pleasant Street. (Board of Selectmen) f. Implement 7, 8, and 9, above (intersection / rotary improvements) prior to implementation of any measures in this section 18. g. Create a new two-way road at the interface of the new Boys and Girls Club property and the Craig property, or otherwise, should the property be developed as an expansion of the Boys and Girls Club facilities, construct the road east of those facilities. (Board of Selectmen) Re-Examine Parking 1. Only after Study recommended in #18, above, establish on-street parking along Pleasant Street generally from the intersection of Sparks Avenue to 5- Corners. On Pleasant Street, beginning at Lucky’s Express, introduce diagonal parking on that side of the street down to Dave Street. (Board of Selectmen) 2. See “collective” or “shared” parking requirement, described above under “Land Use”. 3. See improvements to diagonal and/or head-in parking on West Creek Road, as described in 13, above, under “Traffic / Transportation”. 4. Only after Study recommended in #18, above, where possible, add on-street parking on other side streets. (Board of Selectmen) 5. Negotiate and implement cross- agreements among the owners of all parking facilities to implement the concept of a pool of parking accessible to all employees and shoppers in the Mid- Island area. (Planning Board, Mid-Island Partnership, Board of Selectmen) 6. Redesign and restructure existing parking areas, as needed, to improve circulation and efficiency, particularly the Sanford lot (Planning Board, Business and property Owners). 7. Place Parking consistently behind structures; place structures at, or near, the street line (see provision in “Land Use”, above). (Planning Board, HDC) Improve the System of Bike Paths 1. Provide an in-Town Bike Path / Route connecting the Mid-Island area and Rotary with the Downtown. (Board of Selectmen) 2. Provide a bike path along the south side of Sparks Avenue, connecting the Surfside Road Bike Path with the Milestone and Old South Road Bike Paths. (Board of Selectmen) _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 29 3. Provide bike path and bike route interconnections between Mid-Island destinations (such as the Stop & Shop, the Schools, and the Boys & Girls Club), and the termini of existing bike paths. (Board of Selectmen) 4. Provide a bike path connection to the Sparks Avenue Path through School property to connect from the Backus Lane Path. (Board of Selectmen) 5. Provide and expand bike racks throughout the Mid-Island area, especially at the Stop & Shop, Marine Home Center, the Commons, and at any public facility in the project area. Transit Improvements/Initiatives for the NRTA In the short term, modify the shuttle system routes to better serve the Mid-Island Area through possible minor route modifications, route re-direction, and through marketing of existing stops. (NRTA): 1. Adjust the Miacomet Loop to continue at Prospect St. to Sparks Ave then turning into Sanford Rd., adding a stop there (later to become the Mid-Island Hub stop), then onto Pleasant St., W. Dover into town. 2. Adjust the Sconset Routes to come into the Mid-Island via lower Sparks at the Rotary, traveling into town on Pleasant St. to Freedom Sq., (a stop in Freedom Sq.) or Bear, Williams or W. Dover back to Orange St. into town. 3) Adjust the Madaket Route to come out of town via S.Water St. to Washington St., turning left onto Salem St., left onto Candle St., left onto Main St., right onto Pleasant St., right onto Mill St., right onto Quaker Rd. then left onto Madaket Rd. 3. As a long-term solution, establish a Mid- Island transit facility, with opportunities for ticket and pass sales and transfer passes in and through the Mid-Island area. The purpose of this facility is to acknowledge that the Mid-Island area is a major employment center, and to facilitate transport of employees to this area. In addition, such a facility would encourage transit use by all other populations seeking to use Mid-Island services or traverse the Island by transit. (NRTA) 4. Provide enhanced bus stop facilities and locations, with more formal pull-offs and shelters. (NRTA, Board of Selectmen) 5. Provide schedules at stops. (NRTA) 6. Institute a targeted marketing program to engage Mid-Island employers in a concerted program to purchase shuttle passes for their employees, and to provide incentives for their customers to use the shuttle. (NRTA, Ad Hoc Transportation Committee, Mid-Island Partnership) Infrastructure 1. To the extent feasible, design and construct the intersection and Rotary improvements contained in # 7, 8, and 9 of the “Traffic / Transportation” improvements, as well as the pedestrian and streetscape improvements described in “Traffic/Transportation”, as a single project, or as projects implemented simultaneously. (Board of Selectmen) 2. Because the current fire station site is not large enough to provide for the future fire protection needs of the community, the Board of Selectmen should examine the need and feasibility of providing a replacement facility for the current Fire Station somewhere in the Mid-Island Area (not necessarily within the limits of the Area Plan study area). (Board of Selectmen) 3. Inventory the extent and condition of water, sanitary sewer, and storm drainage facilities in the study area. Use this assessment as the basis for a short-range and long-range capital program of repair and / or replacement. (Board of Selectmen, DPW) _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 30 4. Improve the storm drainage system on Pleasant Street near Tresses through a short-range capital program objective. (Board of Selectmen, DPW) 5. The study area is located completely within the Harbor Watershed. Ensure that improvements to the drainage system use the best available technology to protect the water quality of the Harbor. (Board of Selectmen, DPW, Planning Board) 6. Place utilities underground at a minimum along Pleasant Street in connection with streetscape improvements. If cost is prohibitive, at least install conduit, in anticipation of placing utilities underground in the future. (Board of Selectmen, Electric Company) 7. Provide public restroom facilities and water fountains. (Board of Selectmen, DPW) 8. Re-establish a recycling station or stations in the Mid-Island area, in an effort to reduce landfill trips. (Board of Selectmen, DPW) 9. Establish a “sense of arrival” and identity for the Mid-Island area through the creation of a mini-park at the apex of the Sparks and Pleasant Street intersection in connection with intersection improvements. (Board of Selectmen) 10. Establish small pocket parks throughout the Mid-Island area. Specifically, acquire private lot at the intersection of Orange and Union Street. (Board of Selectmen, Land Bank, Mid-Island Partnership) 11. Establish uniform shielded thematic lighting throughout the Mid-Island Area. (Board of Selectmen) 12. Financing Public Infrastructure Capital and Maintenance Needs: 13. Establish within the Town’s capital program a long-range element for financing a portion of the capital needs of this Area Plan. (Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee) 14. Include within the NP&EDC’s Regional Transportation Improvement (TIP) Program priority State and Federal funding to supplemental local capital improvement needs. (NP&EDC) 15. Explore the feasibility of applying for Public Works Economic Development (PWED) funds to finance priority infrastructure needs. (NP&EDC, MIAPWG, Board of Selectmen) 16. Explore with Federal and State legislators the opportunities for State bond funds or Federal earmarks to fund Mid-Island public improvements. (Legislators, Board of Selectmen, MIAPWG) 17. Explore the feasibility of establishing a Business improvement District to provide for on-going infrastructure improvements and maintenance in the Mid-Island Area. (Mid-Island Partnership) _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 31 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX AA Mid-Island Area Plan Work Group Current Members: Mid-Island Partnership Representatives: Edward J. Sanford, Chairman Joel Brown, Vice-Chairman Theresa McGrady Jan Jaeger Pat Rottmeier Walter Steinkrauss / Arthur Reade / Greg O’Brien (Stop and Shop) Denis Gazaille Neighborhood Representatives: Jay Fox Elizabeth Almodobar NP&EDC Representatives: Alvin S. Topham Christine Silverstein Past Members: Denese Allen Sue Johnsen Dorothy McGarvey _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 32 Mid-Island Area Plan Work Group Ex Officio Members: Board of Selectmen Town Administrator (Libby Gibson) NP&EDC Staff (John D. Pagini AICP, Director / Mike Burns, Transportation Planner) HDC (Mark Voigt) Fire Chief (Bruce Watts (retired) and Stephen Murphy (interim Chief)) Police Chief (Randy Norris) DPW (Jeff Willett) NRTA (Paula Leary) Park and Recreation (Jimmy Manchester) Postmaster Nantucket Civic League Nantucket Town Association Boys and Girls Club Nantucket Public Schools (Jack MacFarland) Nantucket Cottage Hospital (Richard Clark) Traffic Safety Committee (Patrick Carr) Builder’s Association (Denis Gazaille) Nantucket Resident Housing Partnership (Christine Silverstein) Nantucket Garden Club Wannacomet Water Company (Bob Gardner) Consultants: Preservation Institute: Nantucket Peter Prugh TND Engineering, Inc. Chester “Rick” Chellman _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 33 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX BB Area Plan Boundary _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 34 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX CC Area Plan Subareas _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 35 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX DD Summary of Issues Identified at the Mid-Island Area Plan Work Group Workshops of June 19 and 26, 2001 Subarea A: Hospital / Schools Score Issue 1. Transportation 20 4-Corners intersection congestion 7 Safety / emergency access at Hospital, Schools due to traffic congestion 7 Safety of school children 2 Improvements for shuttle stops 2 Pedestrian system imperfections _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 36 1 Insufficient parking capacity at the schools, esp. for special events End of Bike Path (safety concerns) 2. Land Use / Zoning 8 New Overlay district zone (institutions vs. commercial development) 5 Zoning and use compatibility 3 Make non-conforming uses conforming 1 Match zoning to current uses (Holdgates, Hospital, Gouin Village) 3. Infrastructure 6 Parks 3 Restroom Facilities Rest areas at bike paths and shuttle stops 4. Housing 5 Employee Housing near place of employment 2 2nd Dwelling infill potential On-site housing _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 37 Subarea B: Cherry Street Score Issue 1. Transportation 16 Traffic flow – reexamine one-way patterns 8 Parking on street at Fahey and Fromagerie – Pleasant Street 7 Sight line issues / encroachments in ROWs 3 Realign Intersection at Williams and Pleasant 2 Imperfections in pedestrian system 1 On-street capacity for bike paths, parking, ped. systems; possible widening 1 Truck traffic on Orange Street Size of vehicles on Street _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 38 2. Land Use / Zoning a. Promote infill potential 4 Setbacks – front yard (R-1 zone) 3. Infrastructure 7 Parks, public use (i.e., Orange / Union vacant lot for safety and aesthetics) 4 Bike path 3 Lighting 2 Signage 2 Sidewalks 1 Better shuttle stops Underground utilities ________________________________________________________________________ 4. Housing In-fill for housing Existing / expanding dormitories _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 39 Subarea C: Boys and Girls / Craig Score Issue 1. Transportation 11 Transit hub 10 Traffic flow – re-examine (Sam Park Study) 7 Traffic calming 3 Safety at Boys and Girls Club crossing 2 Sparks Avenue as artery 2 Road widening 1 Pleasant Street as a commercial street (Main Street) Parking capacity Shared parking (Park and walk to errands) Parking @ Pleasant Street at Boys and Girls Club Need for crosswalk at Boys and Girls Club at Nantucket Office Products Drop-off / pick-up @ Boys and Girls Club _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 40 2. Land Use / Zoning 6 Shared parking 3 Craig parcel evaluation / uses 1 Incentives for parking reduction Parking requirement too strenuous - reduce 20% green space requirement – relax / reallocate 3. Infrastructure 3 Sidewalks 2 Lighting Bike Paths 4. Housing 3 Potential for Craig Property Infill for housing _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 41 Subarea D: Commons / Marine Score Issue 1. Transportation 7 Better traffic flow through Commons (wetlands issues) 6 Shared parking 4 Orange Street as arterial (2-way) 3 On-street parking on Pleasant Street 3 Post Office congestion 3 Reconsider traffic direction 2 Sidewalks / crosswalks 2 Pedestrian connections Improve bus stops _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 42 2. Land Use / Zoning 5 Clear title for Post Office / resolve drainage easement 4 Provide vertical greenspace 4 Place parking behind buildings / place buildings close to street Re-examine parking bylaw Re-examine 20% greenspace provision 3. Infrastructure 2 Provide vertical greenspace 2 Restrooms for public use 1 Small parks / beautification projects Water fountains Maintain resources Sidewalks Lighting – safety and aesthetics 4. Housing 5 Encourage mixed use development In-fill potential for housing Re-draw / expand MFOD for multi-family development _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 43 Subarea E: Sanford Boat / Stop & Shop Score Issue 1. Transportation 13 Congestion 7 Pleasant Street as Main Street (on-street parking) 6 Shared parking (vehicle access vs. non-vehicle access) 5 Parking lot integration 3 Maximize public transit 3 Traffic flow in and out of Stop & Shop 3 Safety – Fire Dept. 3 Affects of traffic flow from Post Office 1 Sparks / Hooper Farm intersection Shuttle stop improvements – Hooper Farm and Sparks Av. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 44 Parking lots used as streets Truck access / truck delivery times Investigate geometry changes Multiple curb cuts Incentives to use public transit 2. Land Use / Zoning 4 Shared parking 3 Green space 3 Re-evaluate space for public facilities (fire and police) 2 Expand multi-family uses (zoning change) Excessive parking requirements 3. Infrastructure 3 Mini-parks 3 Streetscape improvements Vertical landscaping Lighting Underground utilities Public facilities Irrigation Drainage problems (Geronimo’s and Post Office) Recycling stations Sewer system inadequate 4. Housing 3 Apartments above businesses Mixed Use _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 45 Subarea F: West Creek / Rotary Score Issue 1. Transportation 14 Hooper Farm / Sparks / Pleasant intersection “nightmare” 7 Chin’s Way as a through Street 5 West Creek Road traffic flow conflicts with head-in parking 4 Pedestrian / sidewalks 2 Tweek rotary 2. Land Use / Zoning 6 Place buildings in front, parking in back 4 Relocate Fire Department to near Wannacomet Water Company _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 46 Zone change from residential to commercial zoning for lots on south side of Sparks Avenue, between H.F. Road and the I&M. 3. Infrastructure 2 Streetscapes 1 Sidewalks Lighting Parks Drainage at Orange and West Creek Bike facilities 4. Housing Infill / mixed use MFOD expansion Encourage NEHOD applications _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 47 Entire Planning Area Entire Planning Area Score Issue 1. All Issues 18 Traffic patterns 15 Character preservation 5 Buildings in front, parking in back 5 Takings for public ways and for access 3 In-fill _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 48 3 Promote mixed use, affordable housing 3 Park facilities 2 Pedestrian improvements, safety 1 Drainage Improvements / Maintenance 1 Bike path connections / routes 1 Lighting Sewer / water / electric Public facilities Shared parking Improved bus stops Bike facilities _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 49 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX EE MID-ISLAND AREA PLAN WORK GROUP 25 Top Issues Identified in Mid-Island Area (by Sub-area) (Workshop Meetings of June 19 and 26, 2001) 20 4-Corners intersection congestion (Hospital / Schools) 16 Traffic flow – re-examine one-way patterns (Cherry St.) 14 Hooper Farm / Sparks / Pleasant intersection “nightmare” (West Creek / Rotary) 13 Congestion (Sanford Boat / Stop & Shop) 11 Transit hub (Boys and Girls / Craig) 10 Traffic flow – re-examine (Sam Park Study) (Boys and Girls / Craig) 8 New Overlay district zone (institutions vs. commercial development) (Hospitals / Schools) 8 Parking on street at Fahey and Fromagerie – Pleasant Street (Cherry Street) 7 Sight line issues / encroachments in ROWs (Cherry Street) 7 Safety / emergency access at Hospital, Schools due to traffic congestion (Hospital / Schools) 7 Safety of school children (Hospital / Schools) 7 Parks, public use (i.e., Orange / Union vacant lot for safety and aesthetics) (Cherry Street) 7 Traffic calming (Boys & Girls / Craig) 7 Better traffic flow through Commons (wetlands issues) (Commons / Marine) 7 Pleasant Street as Main Street (on-street parking) (Sanford Boat / Stop & Shop) 7 Chin’s Way as a through Street (West Creek / Rotary) 7 Parks, public use (i.e., Orange / Union vacant lot for safety and aesthetics) (West Creek / Rotary) 6 Place buildings in front, parking in back (West Creek / Rotary) 6 Promote infill potential (Cherry Street) 6 Shared parking (Boys & Girls / Craig; Sanford Boat / S&S; Commons / Marine) 5 Zoning and use compatibility (Hospital / Schools) 5 Employee Housing near place of employment (Hospital / Schools) 5 Clear title for Post Office / Resolve drainage easement (Commons / Marine) 5 Encourage mixed use development (Commons / Marine) 5 Parking lot integration (Sanford Boat / Stop & Shop) 5 West Creek traffic flow conflicts with head-in parking (West Creek / Rotary) _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 50 MID-ISLAND AREA PLAN WORK GROUP 10 Top General Issues Identified in Mid-Island Area (Entire Planning Area) (Workshop Meetings of June 19 and 26, 2001) 18 Traffic patterns 15 Character preservation 5 Buildings in front, parking in back 5 Takings for public ways and for access 3 In-fill 3 Promote mixed use, affordable housing 3 Park facilities 2 Pedestrian improvements, safety 1 Drainage Improvements / Maintenance 1 Bike path connections / routes 1 Lighting _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 51 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX FF June 26, 2002 Public Meeting Comments: 1. Walking and biking to school: increase safety for bikes and pedestrians. 2. Infrastructure improvements around schools. 3. Need for alternative connection from Surfside Road to Sparks Avenue (Backus/First Way). 4. Effect of one-way streets on residential access. 5. Positive start for the Mid-Island area (congestion). 6. Is there much need for Town taking of property? (Swapping of properties?) 7. Can Chin’s Way be used as through-way? (Is the potential for use of right-of-way by pedestrians and/or vehicles?) 8. Additional development of pedestrian paths through the area will allow for better pedestrian access to commercial uses and bus stops. 9. Concern of access in and out of the bank and future Post Office parking lots. Potentially use Sparks Ave. entrance as entrance/exit. Provide Sparks Ave. as option for an exit. 10. Addition of vertical green space (i.e. trees). 11. If buildings do not have well accessible entrances, then they would serve to block access into the building. 12. Concern for safety for children crossing from school to Boys/Girls Club. Need addition of sidewalks and well-developed crossing opportunities. 13. Need for additional access to the ice rink for bikes and pedestrians. 14. Zoning should be examined to understand how it can facilitate/allow changes. 15. Historic consideration: development an overlay district that considers an historic-style of development specific to this area. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 52 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX GG Table of Parking Requirements (in §139-18 of the Zoning Bylaw) Principal and Accessory Uses "A" Number of Spaces Single-family dwellings 1 space per dwelling Dwelling unit 1 space per dwelling unit Principal and Accessory Uses "B" Rooming, lodging and guest houses: outside the core and RPP District 3 spaces plus 1 space for each rental unit over 2 Inside the core and RPP District 3 spaces plus 1 space for each 3 rental unit over 2 Motels, hotels and inns: outside the core and RPP District 2 spaces plus 1 space for each rental unit and 1 space for each 3 persons of total certified building occupancy for meetings and functions. Inside the core and RPP District 2 spaces plus 1 space for each 3 rental units plus 1 space for each 3 persons of total certified building occupancy for meetings and functions. Restaurants, taverns and bars including their outside seated service areas: outside the core and RPP District 1 space for each 4 seats Inside the core and RPP District 1 space for each 8 seats Take-out food establishments 5 spaces per take-out service station and 1 for each 4 seats Nursing homes Employer dormitories 1 space for each 2 beds Retail stores and services 1 for each 200 square feet of gross floor area Recreational facilities (commercial) 1 for each 3 persons of total certified building occupancy Bowling alleys 4 spaces for each alley Commercial or business uses (those in "B" above) In addition to the foregoing requirements, 1 for each 3 employees or workers on peak shift Principal and Accessory Uses "C" Theatres, auditoriums and other places of public assembly 1 space for each 4 seats Offices 1 for each 200 square feet of gross floor area Business-related offices in dwellings 3 spaces plus 1 space for an employee if any Warehouses and other business, commercial or industrial buildings spaces (other than offices) not generally open to the public 1 for each 900 square feet of gross floor area Multifamily uses in Academy Hill District and Our Island Home District 1 space for each 2 dwelling units Dormitory Overlay District a minimum of 4 but otherwise not to exceed 1 for every 5 occupants _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 53 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX II Map of the Area Plan Stop and Shop Complex Plan _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 54 AA PP PP EE NNDD II XX JJ _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 55 AA PP PP EE NN DD II XX KK _____________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Mid-Island Area Plan, February 2003 56 Appendix L