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2010 Town Report_201401231019531535 2010 TOWN OF NANTUCKET ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1, 2009 – JUNE 30, 2010 Cover Photograph: Brant Point in winter Photograph courtesy of Brian J. Chadwick Production: Athol Press, Inc. This document contains the reports of the Board of Selectmen, School, the Finance Department, and other such reports as are considered expedient. This report is prepared pursuant to Section 49 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and other applicable statutes. The Town of Nantucket advises applicants, participants, and the public that it does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to, access to, treatment, or employment in its programs, services, and activities. The Town of Nantucket will provide auxiliary aids and services to access programs upon request. Inquiries, requests, and concerns may be directed to the Town Manager, Town and County Building, 16 Broad Street, Nantucket, Massachusetts 02554, (508) 228-7255. IF YOU NEED A LARGE PRINT VERSION OF THE ANNUAL REPORT, CONTACT TOWN ADMINISTRATION (508) 228-7255. FISCAL YEAR 2010 ANNUAL TOWN REPORTS TOWN AND COUNTY OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS (for the period covering July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010) IN MEMORIAM To the following persons who served the Town of Nantucket and passed away during fiscal year 2010: LAVON KATHLEEN DAY WILLIAM BROOKS GURLEY, JR. JOHN FRANCIS KEATING PHYLLIS ANN LEMA JOHN D. MCFARLAND ROBERT WILLIAM SANDSBURY IRENE MAUD SMITH EMILY RITA STARK WE ARE GRATEFUL FOR THEIR YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE TOWN OF NANTUCKET NANTUCKET “AT A GLANCE” GENERAL INFORMATION County: Nantucket Kind of Community: Resort, Retirement, Artistic Type of Government: Town Manager, Selectmen, Open Town Meeting Area: 47.8 Square Miles 2009 Population: 11,322 Population per Square Mile (2009): 236.81 Moody’s Bond Rating (as of 12/2010): Aa2 Town Website: www.nantucket-ma.gov FISCAL YEAR 2010 TAX RATES, LEVIES, ASSESSED VALUES, AND REVENUE SOURCES TAX RATE (per $1,000) TAX LEVY ASSESSED VALUE Residential $3.01 $ 53,597,538 $ 18,609,952,032 Open Space $2.88 $ 44,065 $ 15,300,200 Commercial $5.35 $ 6,269,758 $ 1,171,917,524 Industrial $5.35 $ 327,457 $ 61,207,044 Personal Property $5.35 $ 1,094,777 $ 204,631,215 TOTAL $ 61,333,595 $ 20,063,008,015 REVENUE SOURCES DOLLAR AMOUNT PERCENT OF TOTAL Tax Levy $ 61,333,595 54.93% State Aid $ 1,700,176 1.53% Local Receipts $ 37,513,988 33.59% Other Available $ 11,109,264 9.95% TOTAL $111,657,023 100.00% FISCAL YEAR 2010 PROPOSITION 2-1/2 LEVY CAPACITY FISCAL YEAR 2010 STATE AID Levy Base $ 50,556,143 Education $ 1,413,950 2-1/2 % Increase $ 1,263,904 General Government $ 286,226 New Growth $ 683,501 Overestimates $ 0 Override $ 0 Total Assessments ($ 366,044) Levy Limit $ 52,503,548 Net State Aid $ 1,334,132 Debt Excluded $ 8,890,665 Excess Capacity $ 60,617 Ceiling $ 501,575,200 Override Capacity $ 440,241,605 RESERVES REVALUATION Free Cash (07/01/2009) $4,192,240 Most Recent Fiscal Year 2010 Fiscal Year 2010 Overlay Reserve $ 832,311 Next Scheduled Fiscal Year 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION Elected Officials................................................................................................................................1 Appointed Officials/Town of Nantucket Departments........................................................................3 Boards, Commissions, Committees................................................................................................10 State and County Officers...............................................................................................................17 Appointments by County Commissioners .......................................................................................17 Nantucket State and Federal Representatives................................................................................17 GENERAL GOVERNMENT REPORTS Board of Selectmen.........................................................................................................................18 Human Resources..........................................................................................................................19 Information Technology...................................................................................................................20 Land Bank, Nantucket Islands ........................................................................................................21 Legislative Update...........................................................................................................................23 Municipal Finance, Department of...................................................................................................24 Town Manager................................................................................................................................29 Town Clerk (elections, town meetings) ...........................................................................................31 Town Counsel.................................................................................................................................42 HUMAN SERVICES REPORTS Council for Human Services............................................................................................................48 Council on Aging.............................................................................................................................49 Our Island Home.............................................................................................................................51 INSPECTIONAL SERVICES REPORTS Building Department........................................................................................................................54 Health Department..........................................................................................................................55 ISLAND SERVICES REPORTS Airport, Nantucket Memorial............................................................................................................58 Marine and Coastal Resources Department ...................................................................................60 Parks and Recreation Department..................................................................................................63 Public Works, Department of ..........................................................................................................64 Steamship Authority, Woods Hole, Martha’s Vineyard & Nantucket ...............................................65 Visitor Services Department............................................................................................................66 Siasconset Water Department........................................................................................................67 Wannacomet Water Company........................................................................................................68 PLANNING AND ZONING REPORTS Conservation Commission..............................................................................................................70 Historic District Commission ...........................................................................................................71 Planning Board ...............................................................................................................................74 Planning and Economic Development Commission, Nantucket......................................................80 Zoning Board of Appeals.................................................................................................................84 Zoning Enforcement........................................................................................................................85 PUBLIC SAFETY REPORTS Emergency Management/Preparedness.........................................................................................87 Fire Department..............................................................................................................................88 Police Department...........................................................................................................................89 SCHOOL REPORTS Nantucket Public Schools ...............................................................................................................93 COUNTY REPORT Registry of Deeds............................................................................................................................99 TOWN AND COUNTY COMMITTEE/COMMISSION REPORTS Abatement Advisory Committee....................................................................................................101 Advisory Committee of Non-Voting Taxpayers..............................................................................101 Beach Management Advisory Committee.....................................................................................102 Cemetery Commission Workgroup...............................................................................................102 Commission on Disability..............................................................................................................103 Community Preservation Committee, Nantucket...........................................................................104 Cultural Council.............................................................................................................................106 Energy Study Committee..............................................................................................................106 Harbor Shellfish Advisory Board...................................................................................................107 Historical Commission, Nantucket.................................................................................................108 Roads and Right of Way Committee.............................................................................................108 Scholarship Committee.................................................................................................................110 COMPENSATION REPORTS Town and County Employee Salaries...........................................................................................111 Photograph Credits H. Flint Ranney, pp. 69 Staff Photographs, pp. 19, 21, 53, 57, 60, 73, 92, 102 GENERAL INFORMATION Elected Officials (terms expire at Annual Town Election in year noted) Board of Selectmen Patricia Roggeveen (2010) – re-elected, Chairman 2013 Rick Atherton 2011 Brian J. Chadwick 2011 Michael Kopko 2012 Allen Reinhard (2010) – succeeded by Whiting Willauer 2013 Community Preservation Committee (at large) Kenneth Beaugrand – resigned 2009, succeeded by Channing Moore 2012 Richard Brannigan 2012 Harbor and Shellfish Advisory Board Peter Boyce (2010) – re-elected, Chairman 2013 Frederick Holdgate 2011 Bill Blount 2011 Robert Rank 2012 Douglas Smith 2012 Wendy McCrae (2010) – re-elected 2013 Bam LaFarge (2010) – succeeded by Mike Glowacki 2013 Historic District Commission Dirk Roggeveen, Chairman 2011 David Barham 2011 Valerie Norton – resigned 2009, succeeded by Kevin Keuster 2012 John F. McLaughlin (2010) – re-elected 2013 Linda Williams (2010) – re-elected 2013 Diane Coombs, Associate Member 2011 John R. Wagley, Associate Member 2012 Dawn Holdgate, Associate Member (2010) – re-elected 2013 Housing Authority, Nantucket Bertyl V. Johnson, Jr. (2010) – re-elected, Chairman 2015 Norman Chaleki 2011 Linda Williams 2013 John O’Neill 2014 Vacant, State Appointee 2012 Page 1 Land Bank Commission, Nantucket Islands John Stackpole, Chairman 2014 Leslie Johnson 2011 Robert L. Gardner 2012 Allen Reinhard 2013 Philip Bartlett (2010) – re-elected 2015 Moderator Sarah F. Alger (2010) - re-elected 2011 Planning Board Barry Rector, Chairman 2014 John McLaughlin 2011 Nathaniel E. Lowell 2012 Linda Williams 2013 Sylvia Howard (2010) – re-elected 2015 Alternate Members (appointed by Board of Selectmen) Jean Wagley 2011 John West 2012 Diane Coombs 2013 School Committee Jeanette Garneau (2010) – re-elected, Chairman 2013 Timothy Lepore 2011 Robin Harvey 2011 Helene Blair 2012 Melissa Murphy 2012 Town Clerk Catherine Flanagan Stover (2010) – re-elected 2013 Water Commission, Nantucket Nelson Eldridge 2011 Allen Reinhard 2012 Noreen Slavitz (2010) – re-elected 2013 Water Commission, Siasconset Gerald Eldridge 2011 Robert Benchley, III 2012 John Pearl (2010) – re-elected 2013 Page 2 APPOINTED OFFICIALS Airport, Nantucket Memorial Alfred Peterson, Manager Theresa M. Smith, Finance Director Pamela K. Bell, Assistant to Finance Director Janine Torres, Administrative Assistant Yolanda Taylor, Administrative Coordinator Jeffrey F. Marks, Airfield Supervisor David Sylvia, Compliance/Training Coordinator Robert Tallman, Terminal/Security Coordinator Jack Wheeler, Environmental Coordinator Paul Letendre’, Clerk of the Works Jorene Partida, Security Assistant John Grangrade, Maintenance Foreman Garrett W. Allen, Maintenance/EMT Peter B. Fowler, Maintenance Specialist Robert Holdgate, Maintenance Specialist Kristian Kieffer, Maintenance Specialist Michael O’Neil, Maintenance Specialist Matthew Aguiar, Maintenance Specialist Matthew Dunham, Maintenance Specialist Ted B. Muhler, Terminal Maintenance Specialist John A. Davis, Terminal Maintenance Specialist Leonard I. Liburd, Terminal Maintenance Specialist Noe R. Pineda, Terminal Maintenance Specialist Blaine C. Buckley, Operations Supervisor Preston Harimon, Operations Supervisor/EMT Frederick Wellington, Operations Specialist Bruce L. King, Operations Specialist Timothy D. Mooney, Operations Specialist Addison Falconer, Operations Specialist Shanroy Nelson, Operations Specialist Joseph Tormay, Operations Specialist Debra A. Crooks, Fixed Base Operations Supervisor Leisa M. Heintz, Fixed Base Operations Representative Catherine Mack, Fixed Base Operations Representative Pat Tyler, Fixed Base Operations Representative Building Department Bernard Bartlett, Building Commissioner Stephen Butler, Local Inspector Anne Barrett, Administrative Assistant Karen Carpenter, Administrative Assistant Inspectors (appointed by Building Commissioner/Town Manager) William Ciarmataro, Gas/Plumbing Inspector Page 3 William Larrabee, Wiring Inspector Conservation Commission Dirk Roggeveen, Administrator Catherine Dickey, Office Administrator Constables Manny Dias James Perelman Frank Psaradelis, Jr. Robert Reardon Jerry Adams Catherine Stover John Stover David Fronzuto Council for Human Services Maryanne Worth, Coordinator Ann Medina, Administrative Assistant Council on Aging Linda Roberts, Director Virginia Carrera, Assistant Director Gail Holdgate, Administrative Assistant Emergency Preparedness, Office of William Pittman, Director Finance Department Constance Voges, Finance Director Irene Lynch-Larivee, Assistant Finance Director Deborah Weiner, Treasurer Elizabeth Brown, Tax Collector Robert Dickinson, Controller Deborah Dilworth, Assessor Pamela Butler, Assistant Tax Collector Krista Lewis, Payroll Administrator Ellen Trifero, Assistant Assessor Maureen DiLuca, Field Assessor Patricia Giles, Senior Clerk Elizabeth Flanagan, Senior Clerk Thomas Erichsen, Data Collector Kathleen Richen, Operations Coordinator Patricia Murphy, Administrative Assistant/Collection Linda MacDonald, Administrative Assistant/Treasury Wanda Hilts, Accounts Payable Coordinator Deborah Palmer, Staff Accountant Robin LaPiene, Accounting Clerk Page 4 Fire Department Mark McDougall, Chief Edward Maxwell, Deputy Chief Max Nicholas, Second Call Deputy Chief Nelson Eldridge, Third Call Deputy Chief Jeanette Hull, Office Administrator/EMT Elizabeth Shannon, Fire Prevention Officer/Firefighter/EMT Robert Bates, Fire Alarm Superintendent/Firefighter/EMT Thomas Holden, Captain, Firefighter/EMT Francis Hanlon, Captain, Firefighter/EMT Stephen Murphy, Captain, Firefighter/EMT Matthew Dixon, Captain, Firefighter/EMT Earl Eldridge, Firefighter/EMT Jeffrey Allen, Firefighter/EMT Peter Cavanagh, Firefighter/EMT Shawn Monaco, Firefighter/EMT Christian Ray, Firefighter/EMT Charles Kymer, Firefighter/EMT Corey Ray, Firefighter/EMT Sean Mitchell, Firefighter/EMT Christopher Beamish, Firefighter/EMT Nathan Barber, Firefighter/EMT John Allen, Firefighter/EMT David Pekarcik, Firefighter/EMT Fire/EMT Call Personnel Beau Barber Rob Benchley Aaron Hull Danny Haynes Brian Gray Gerald Eldridge John Grangrade Neil Paterson David Gray James Hardy Christopher Holland Dan MacAuley Sherry Ponce-Ramos Kenneth Gullicksen Phil Read Carol Moffitt Ralph Hardy Edmund Ramos, Jr. Robert Ramos Shane Perry Norman Gauvin George Vollans Marina Finch Kristina Dagesse Kevin Ramos Michael O’Neil Health Department Richard L. Ray, Health Inspector Artell Crowley, Assistant Health Officer Kathleen LaFavre, Administrative Assistant Historic District Commission Mark Voigt, Administrator James Grieder, Assistant Administrator Terry Norton, Administrative Assistant Ann Medina, Administrative Assistant Human Resources Patricia Perris, Director Heather Pratt, HR Benefits Assistant Page 5 Information Technology/Geographic Systems Linda Rhodes, Information Technology Manager Nathan Porter, Information Technology and Geographic Information Systems Coordinator Molly Sprouse, Information Technology and Geographic Information Systems Technician Patrick McGloin, Information Technology and Geographic Information Systems Technician Land Bank Commission Eric Savetsky, Executive Director Jesse A. Bell, Administrator/Fiscal Officer Susan Campese, Assistant Administrator Bruce Perry, Resource Planner/Ecologist Jeffrey Pollock, Property Supervisor Robert Earley, Assistant Property Manager Edward Boynton, Assistant Property Manager Marine and Coastal Resources Department David Fronzuto, Marine Superintendent/Harbormaster Sheila Lucey, Assistant Marine Superintendent/Assistant Harbormaster Jeff Carlson, Beach Manager Dwayne Dougan, Deputy Shellfish Officer Tara Riley, Shellfish Biologist Kenneth Lappin, Assistant Harbormaster Elizabeth McIsaac, Office Administrator/Licensing Agent Our Island Home Pamela Meriam, Administrator Rachael Day, Assistant Administrator Gail Ellis, RN, Director of Nursing Joanne McGarry, Medical Records Assistant Susan Balester, Business Operations Coordinator John Hayes, Plant Operations Manager Hugh MacVicar, Food Service Supervisor Sara Jones, Staff Development Coordinator Gisela MacDonald, Activities Director Sybil Nickerson, Assistant Activities Director Erika Kieffer, Business Office Assistant Laurie MacVicar-Fiske, Social Worker Katherine Eilert, Director, Adult Community Day Care Liz Campochiaro, Adult Community Day Care Aide Andrea Marks, Adult Community Day Care Aide Patricia Dargie, RN Lisa Haye, RN Ann Lindley, RN Priscilla Worswick, RN Lisa Toney, RN Nancy Koyl, LPN Carol Matson, LPN Page 6 Donna King, LPN Panawatara Thairatana, Maintenance Colleen Kinney, Maintenance Deborah Carl, CNA Mentor Diane Otts, CNA Mentor Denise McCarthy-Ricketts, CNA ll Hendrick Wallace, CNA II Sophia Lyttle-Liburd, CNA ll Barbara Clarke, CNA II Jessica Mason, CNA II Jacqueline Harrison, CNA II Avia Capers, CNA II Gloria Sanders, CNA Bridget Bloise, CNA Shaunette Lindo, CNA Patricia Dorius, CNA Keri Flaherty, CNA Hopie Robinson, CNA Ellen Ryder, CNA Sherry Twomey, CNA Ida Griffin, CNA Moira Leveille, CNA Patricia Dorius, CNA Clifford McKellop, CNA Carlos Muniz, CNA Lilian Grimes, CNA Tameika Clarke Outar, CNA Winesome Irons-Fergusen, CNA Mayon McIntyre-Hall, CNA Marvete Ellis, CAN Gabriel Boynton, CNA Keren Rowe Thomas, CNA Marie Campbell-Ward, CNA Laura Noguera, CNA Float Debra Bechtold, Dietician Karen Correira, Cook Ola Mae Coleman, Cook Seubsiri Thairatana, Cook Fernella Phillips, Dietary Aide Virginia Brereton, Dietary Aide Tuki Attapreyangkul, Dietary Aide Willard Baptiste, Dietary Aide Maturod, Thairat, Dietary Aide Kyomitmaitee Maneewan, Dietary Aide Kanmuang Piyaporn, Dietary Float Sandra Araujo, Housekeeper Sheila Barrett, Housekeeper Stormy Reed, Housekeeper Floris Lewis, Housekeeper Cindy Stetson, Launderer Jennifer Pask, Launderer Park and Recreation Department James P. Manchester, Director A.T. Wilce, Office Administrator/Recreation/Youth Coordinator Charles Bartlett, Property Manager Planning Office Andrew Vorce, Planning Director Leslie Snell, Senior Planner Michael Burns, Transportation Planner Susan B. Witte, Housing Planner Jeromette Hicks, Office Administrator Catherine Ancero, Administrative Specialist Venessa Moore, Planning Assistant Police Department William Pittman, Chief Charles Gibson, Deputy Chief Jerry Adams, Lieutenant Angus MacVicar, Lieutenant Thomas Clinger, Sergeant Brendan Coakley, Sergeant Jared Chretien, Sergeant Howard McIntyre, Sergeant Page 7 Daniel Mack, Sergeant Travis Ray, Sergeant Daniel Furtado, Sergeant Kevin Marshall, Sergeant Kevin Rogers, Officer John Muhr, Officer Jerome Mack, Officer Keith Mansfield, Officer Christopher Carnevale, Officer William Higgins, Officer Suzanne Gale, Officer Steven Tornovish, Officer Richard Aprea, Officer Michael Lemenager, Officer Janine Mauldin, Officer Brett Morneau, Officer Michael Nee, Officer Patrick Spera, Officer William Sullivan, Officer Michael Wells, Officer Robert Hollis, Officer Richard Pacheco, Officer John Rockett, Officer Michael Mabardy, Officer David Mahoney, Officer Scott Quigley, Officer Joshua Croft, Officer John Hubbard, Officer Sheila Clinger, Office Administrator Jennifer Erichsen, Information Technology Melinda Burns-Smith, Dispatcher Frances Bassett, Dispatcher Public Works Department Jeffrey L. Willett, Director Mohamed Nabulsi, Assistant Director Diane Holdgate, Administrator Anne Marie Crane, Office Administrator John Braginton-Smith, General Foreman Albert Ottison Raymond Sylvia Kenneth Hammond Tristram Marks Richie O'Neil Nathaniel Ray Dale Gary James Egan Hartley Batchelder Hendy McKenzie Richard Decker Perry Butler Osagie Doyle Paul Clarkson Ardis Gary Paul Boucher, Jr. Tim Masterson Peter Brady John Marques Nicky Duarte Marie Nabulsi Carol Driscoll Scott Williams Wastewater Treatment Facilities Eric Schultz, Chief Plant Operator Bryan Popke Robert Inglis Brian Walsh Kevin Manning Martin Stone David Gray Willy Leveille Town Administration C. Elizabeth Gibson, Town & County Manager Gregg Tivnan, Assistant Town & County Manager Diane O’Neil, Project Manager/Chief Procurement Officer Anne McAndrew, Office Administrator/Licensing Agent Erika D. Mooney, Executive Assistant to the Town Manager Page 8 Siasconset Water Department James Charnes, Superintendent Town Clerk’s Office Catherine Flanagan Stover, Town Clerk Nancy Holmes, Assistant Town Clerk Margaret Altreuter, Administrative Assistant Town Counsel Paul DeRensis, Esquire Tree Warden David Champoux Veteran’s Service Agent/Veteran’s Graves Officer Arnold Paterson Visitor Services and Information Bureau M. Katherine Hamilton Pardee, Director David Sharpe, Office Administrator Wannacomet Water Company Robert L. Gardner, General Manager Heidi Holdgate, Business Manager Janice M. Davis, Customer Service Supervisor Andrea Mansfield, Administrative Assistant Christopher R. Pykosz, Operations Manager Robert West, Engineering Technician Mark J. Willett, Engineer J. Curtis Glidden, Utilityman Jeffrey S. Johnsen, Utilityman Robert Earle, Utilityman Kyle Roberts, Utilityman Zoning Board of Appeals John Brescher, Administrator Zoning Enforcement Marcus Silverstein, Zoning Enforcement Officer Page 9 BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, COMMITTEES (appointed by Board of Selectmen for fiscal year terms) Abatement Advisory Board Joseph McLaughlin 2011 Judith Moran 2011 H. Flint Ranney 2011 Ad Hoc Budget Work Group Patricia Roggeveen, Board of Selectmen 2011 Whiting Willauer, Board of Selectmen 2011 Jenny Garneau, School Committee 2011 Robin Harvey, School Committee 2011 James Kelly, Finance Committee 2011 Matthew Mulcahy, Finance Committee 2011 C. Elizabeth Gibson, Town Manager 2011 Michael Cozort, School Superintendent 2011 Irene Larivee, Assistant Finance Director 2011 Advisory Committee of Non-Voting Taxpayers Howard Blitman, Chairman 2012 David Brown 2011 William Sherman 2011 Robert Lucas Fischer 2011 Richard Wolfe 2011 Roger Ernst 2012 Justin Strauss 2012 James Treanor III 2012 Louis Bassano 2013 Harris E. Stone 2013 Susan Matloff 2013 Agricultural Commission Dylan Wallace, Chairman 2011 Karen Alence 2011 John Bartlett 2011 Stephen Slosek 2012 Morgan Beryl 2013 Airport Commission E. Foley Vaughan, Chairman 2012 Dual Macintyre 2011 Robert Atlee 2011 Sheila O’Brien Egan 2012 Carl D. England, Jr. 2013 Page 10 Article 68 Work Group Michael Misurelli 2011 Lucinda Young 2011 Mark Lucas 2011 Bam LaFarge 2011 Peter Boyce 2011 Ernest Steinauer 2011 Wendy McCrae 2011 Caroline Ellis 2011 Cormac Collier 2011 Lee Saperstein 2011 Seth Rutherford 2011 Audit Committee Patricia Roggeveen, Chairman 2011 Rick Atherton 2011 James Kelly 2011 Beach Management Advisory Committee Maureen Beck, Chairman 2013 Thomas Dickson 2011 Kathleen Van Lieu 2011 Christopher Magee 2012 Tom Quigley 2012 Bulk Fuel Study Committee Whitey Willauer, Board of Selectmen 2011 Brian Chadwick, Board of Selectmen 2011 E. Foley Vaughan, Airport Commission 2011 Dual Macintyre, Airport Commission 2011 Al Peterson, Airport Manager, Ex-Officio Capital Program Committee Peter Hoey, At-Large, Chairman 2012 Robert Schwarzenbach, At-Large 2011 Peter Boynton, At-Large 2011 Phil Stambaugh, At-Large 2013 John Tiffany, Finance Committee 2011 Linda Williams, NP&EDC 2011 Rick Atherton, Board of Selectmen 2011 Cemetery Commission Work Group James McIntosh, At-Large 2011 Carol Ann Marks, At-Large 2012 Penny Snow, At-Large 2013 Liz Coffin, Nantucket Historical Commission 2011 Susan Handy, Nantucket Historical Commission 2011 Page 11 William Steelman, Interfaith Council Representative 2011 Allen Reinhard, Board of Selectmen Representative 2011 Diane Holdgate, Department of Public Works 2011 Catherine Flanagan Stover, Town Clerk 2011 Community Preservation Committee (appointed designees) Ken Beaugrand, Land Bank Commission, Chairman 2013 Linda Williams, Nantucket Housing Authority 2011 Barry Rector, Planning Board 2011 Maria Zodda, Park and Recreation 2011 Michael Kopko, Board of Selectmen 2012 Mark Voigt, Historic District Commission 2013 Clark Whitcomb, Conservation Commission 2013 Conservation Commission Ernest Steinauer, Chairman 2011 Mary Wawro 2011 John Brescher 2012 Sarah Oktay 2012 Andrew Bennett 2013 John Braginton-Smith 2013 Jennifer Karberg 2013 Contract Review Committee, Human Services Mary Wawro, At-Large 2012 John Belash, At-Large 2012 Christopher Kickham, Finance Committee 2011 Charles J. Gardner, NP&EDC 2011 Michael Kopko, Board of Selectmen 2011 Linda Williams, Council for Human Services 2011 Augusto C. Ramos, Council for Human Services 2011 Council for Human Services Dorothy Hertz, Chairman 2012 Bart Koon Cosgrove 2011 Susan Marques 2011 Linda Williams 2011 Linda Carpenter 2012 Richard J. Ross 2012 Augusto C. Ramos 2013 John Belash 2013 Mary Wawro 2013 Council on Aging Tom McGlinn, Chairman 2011 Randy Wight 2011 Kathy Richen 2011 Page 12 John McLaughlin 2012 Patricia Thornton 2012 Jon St. Laurent 2012 Brenda Johnson 2013 Daryl Westbrook 2013 Glenora Kelly Smith 2013 Cultural Council, Nantucket Jordana Fleischut, Chairman 2013 John Belash 2011 Linda Sonnonstine Spery 2011 Amy Jenness 2012 David L. Billings II 2013 John J. McDermott 2013 Downtown Revitalization Committee Patricia Roggeveen, Board of Selectmen 2011 Brian Chadwick, Board of Selectmen 2011 John West, Planning Board 2011 Andrew Vorce, Planning Director 2011 Wendy Hudson, Sustainable Nantucket 2011 David Barham, Historic District Commission 2011 H. Flint Ranney, Steamship Authority 2011 Kate Hamilton, Visitor Services 2011 John Wagley, At-Large 2011 Energy Study Committee Anne Kuszpa, Chairman 2011 Barbara Gookin 2011 Mike Burns 2011 Whiting Willauer 2012 Peter Morrison 2013 H. Flint Ranney 2013 Chris Magee 2013 Finance Committee James Kelly, Chairman 2012 John Tiffany 2011 Matthew Mulcahy 2011 Timothy Soverino 2011 Steven McCluskey 2012 Christopher Kickham 2012 Peter Morrison 2013 Clifford J. Williams 2013 Douglas A. Unruh 2013 Page 13 Harbor Plan Implementation Committee Diane Coombs, At- Large 2011 Whitey Willauer, At- Large 2011 Carl Sjolund, At-Large 2012 Sarah Oktay, At-Large 2012 Leslie Johnson, At-Large 2013 Bam LaFarge, SHAB 2011 Doug Smith, SHAB 2011 Peter Boyce, SHAB 2011 Nantucket Affordable Housing Trust Charles A. Hughes, At-Large 2011 Fernando M. Esteban, At-Large 2011 Matthew MacEachern, At-Large 2012 Linda Williams, Nantucket Housing Authority 2011 Brian Chadwick, Board of Selectmen 2011 Rick Atherton, Board of Selectmen 2011 Michael Kopko, Board of Selectmen 2012 Patricia Roggeveen, Board of Selectmen 2013 Whiting Willauer, Board of Selectmen 2013 Nantucket Historical Commission Deborah Timmermann, Chairman 2013 Philip Gallagher 2011 Diane Coombs 2012 Caroline Ellis 2012 Paul Nicholson 2013 Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission Nathaniel Lowell, Planning Board, Chairman 2012 John McLaughlin, Planning Board 2011 Linda Williams, Planning Board 2013 Barry Rector, Planning Board 2014 Sylvia Howard, Planning Board 2015 Rick Atherton, County Commission 2011 Bertyl Johnson, Housing Authority 2011 Andrew Bennett, Conservation Commission 2011 Jeff Willett, Department of Public Works 2011 Community-at-Large Members Donald Visco 2011 Brain Chadwick 2012 Charles J. Gardner 2013 Parks and Recreation Commission F. Nash Strudwick, Chairman 2012 Charles J. Gardner 2011 Maria Zodda 2011 Page 14 Heather Williams 2012 David Larivee 2013 Registrars of Voters (terms expire March 31) David Goodman 2011 Carolyn Gould 2012 Janet Coffin 2013 Catherine Flanagan Stover, Ex-Officio Roads and Right-of-Way Committee Allen Reinhard, Chairman 2013 Nathaniel Lowell 2011 Lee W. Saperstein 2011 Ann Bissinger 2012 Sylvie O’Donnell 2012 John Stackpole 2012 Harvey Young 2012 D. Anne Atherton 2013 Andrew Vorce, NP&EDC, Ex-Officio Scholarship Committee Jeanette Topham, Chairman 2012 David Fronzuto 2011 Erika D. Mooney 2011 John O’Neill 2012 Philip Gallagher 2012 Pamela Bartlett 2013 Mark Voigt 2013 Michael Cozort, School Superintendent Tree Advisory Committee David Champoux, Chairman, Tree Warden Paul Droz 2011 Whitfield Bourne 2012 James Cook 2012 Sam Myers 2012 Terry Pommett 2012 Michael Misurelli 2013 Jeff Willett, DPW, Ex-Officio Visitor Services and Information Advisory Committee Gene Mahon, Chairman 2013 James Blunt 2011 Linda Williams 2011 Louise Swift 2012 Kristin Chambers-O’Reilly 2012 Diane Reis Flaherty 2013 Page 15 Charles Balas 2013 Wood’s Hole, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket Steamship Authority Port Council Nathaniel Lowell 2011 Zoning Board of Appeals Edward Toole, Chairman 2014 Kerim Koseatac 2011 Dale Waine 2012 Lisa Botticelli 2013 Michael O’Mara 2015 Alternate Members Mark Poor 2011 Susan McCarthy 2012 Michael Angelastro 2013 APPOINTED BY THE TOWN MANAGER Commission on Disability Milton Rowland, Chairman 2011 Richard Moran 2011 Jeanette Topham 2011 Nancy Rezendes 2012 Whitey Willauer 2012 Ellen Braginton-Smith 2013 David Gray 2013 Taxi Advisory Committee David Larivee, Taxi Representative 2011 David Sharpe, Visitor Services 2011 John O’Connor, Restaurant Association 2011 Angus MacVicar, Nantucket Police Department 2011 Traffic Safety Work Group Michael Burns, Transportation Planner 2011 Charles J. Gardner, At-Large 2011 Arthur Gasbarro, At-Large 2011 Mark McDougall, Fire Chief 2011 Erika Mooney, Town Administration 2011 Mohamed Nabulsi, Public Works 2011 William Pittman, Police Chief 2011 Milton Rowland, Commission on Disability 2011 Page 16 STATE AND COUNTY OFFICERS County Commissioners Brian Chadwick, Chairman 2011 Rick Atherton 2011 Michael Kopko 2012 Patricia Roggeveen 2013 Whiting Willauer 2013 Deeds, Registry of Jennifer Ferreira, Register 2012 Kimberly Cassano, Assistant Register Jessica Gage, Administrative Assistant Superior Court Patricia Church, Clerk of Courts – resigned 2010 2012 Succeeded by Mary Elizabeth Adams, Acting Clerk of Courts District Court Joseph I. Macy, First Justice Deborah A. Dunn, Associate Justice Roxana E. Viera, Magistrate/Clerk – resigned 2010 Succeeded by Liza H. Williamson, Acting Magistrate/Clerk Tom Jekanowski, Probation Officer in Charge – resigned 2010 Jennifer Larrabee, Head Administrative Assistant Darlene Hull, Case Coordinator II Probate and Family Court Randy J. Kaplan, Justice Susan Beamish, Register 2014 APPOINTMENTS BY COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Wood’s Hole, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket Steamship Authority Governing Board H. Flint Ranney 2012 NANTUCKET STATE AND FEDERAL REPRESENTATIVES Edward M. Kennedy, US Senator - deceased 2012 Succeeded by Scott P. Brown John F. Kerry, US Senator 2014 William Keating, US Representative 2012 Timothy R. Madden, State Representative 2012 Daniel A. Wolf, State Senator 2012 Page 17 GENERAL GOVERNMENT REPORTS BOARD OF SELECTMEN Economic realities dictated that fiscal austerity and planning remained the top priority for the Town over the last year, and all indications suggest that this will remain the case for a few more years as well. With revenues down by a full 12.9%, driven in no small part by a 41.6% decrease over FY 2008 fees from building department activities, balancing the budget became more than an exercise in maintaining the status quo. Cuts were necessary, and planning on doing more with less through departmental reorganizations, and implementing other recommendations of the Ad Hoc Fiscal Committee was an important focus for the Board. The Town Manager’s efforts in contract negotiations reinforced the disposition of the Board to not just hold, but roll back increased trends in salary and benefit packages for employees, making living-within-our- means the end-game. The Board also led the directive to conduct an independent review of the Town’s legal services, focused on the scope of services and expenses as they related to similar communities in the Commonwealth. The eventual result, after long and careful deliberation and engagement in a RFQ process with 15 firms applying for consideration, was a contract change for the first time in over 20 years in Nantucket’s legal counsel. Other cost centers the Administration joined the Board in reviewing for potential savings to the Town budget included Our Island Home and the Nantucket Landfill. Grappling with ways to ease the increasing sewer rates to users with construction down and new hook-ups falling far behind expectations was a priority as well. The Town also set new standards for the leasing of Town property. The Sherburne Commons experience taught us that good intentions do not protect Town interests, and the Board must rigorously evaluate the capabilities of organizations before allowing Town-owned land to be used by unrelated entities. The result has been improvements in the evaluation process for all groups making an application for property, and the drafting of a model lease which better protects the Town in the event groups do not succeed at their expressed purpose. The year also was marked by new projects and opportunities. Ground was broken for the Nantucket Police Station’s new home on Fairgrounds Road, providing a facility that meets state correction’s code requirements, and supplies other space for community use. The Comcast cable television license renewal was signed with income designated for a public access or PEG (Public Education Government) station. Discussions began for the Town to undertake improvements in the Boulevarde and adjacent Surfside-area roads. And, progress continues on securing public access to our waterfront through Nantucket’s “One Big Beach” initiative. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Town Manager Libby Gibson and former Assistant Town Manager Malachy Rice, as well as Town Administration staff and all Town department heads and employees for their hard work on behalf of Nantucket and its citizens over the past year. Hard fiscal times mean a difficult course for everyone, and as we make progress in balancing our budget, it is important to recognize the extra effort and sacrifice that our Town employees make on behalf of our community. Page 18 From left: Town Manager C. Elizabeth Gibson, Selectmen Rick Atherton, Michael Kopko, Patricia Roggeveen, Brian Chadwick, Whitey Willauer, and new Assistant Town Manager Gregg Tivnan Respectfully submitted, Patricia Roggeveen Chairman HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT Heather Pratt joined the department as the new Human Resources/Benefits Assistant. This position was added as approved at the April 2010 Annual Town Meeting for FY 2010. This addition is a result of the Abrahams Group report from September 2008 which recommended the transfer of benefits administration from the Finance Department to Human Resources to add better control and separation of duty. As a result, the department was able to conduct open enrollment for both the health and dental insurance programs at each work location and to better market the advantages of the health plan that features more preventative care; concentrate time on tracking Workers’ Compensation more effectively and keeping those costs under better review; apply to the Commonwealth ‘s Department of Workforce Development to certify the Town’s seasonal positions and minimize unemployment expense; implement the Commonwealth’s revised Ethics Reform Law which requires annual employee notification and testing; establish guidelines for dealing with temporary contagious illness in the face of the H1N1 outbreak; greatly improve the department’s ability to respond to job candidates and to process paperwork related to the hiring freeze efficiently; welcome and install a new vendor for the required drug testing program; and monitor the new vendor’s billing system. This represents a significant improvement in the department’s day-to-day operation. We also implemented a quarterly employee newsletter called “News & Notes”. This name is the result of an employee-wide newsletter naming contest. The newsletter features department articles, employee accomplishments, comings and goings, and helpful life tips. Human Resources conducted a long list of disciplinary, fact-finding and problem solving meetings in a continuing effort to improve employee performance and to clarify procedures. During the year Human Resources participated in union negotiations with 1199 SEIU at Our Island Home and with the School Committee union negotiation team. Page 19 A little beyond the scope of Human Resources, the Director wrote and received the Pepsi Challenge grant of time and hands to begin the process of restoring the outside of the Teen Center. The Town of Nantucket’s application was selected from over 250 entries. The department also hosted a workshop on sexual harassment that was presented by the lead counselor from the Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Respectfully submitted, Patricia M. Perris Human Resources Director INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Information Technology Department is responsible for implementing and maintaining the technology infrastructure and computing environment for the Town of Nantucket. This encompasses all desktop and laptop computers, software and business applications, networked servers and wireless and fiber network communications equipment. Other responsibilities include the administration and management of the Town’s internal email system, main municipal financial system (MUNIS), Geographic Information System (GIS), Document Management System and the Town’s website, www.nantucket-ma.gov. Our department’s primary goal is to provide a reliable, secure computing environment that facilitates the use of technology to deliver a more effective and efficient government to the citizens and business community of Nantucket. The following is a summary of the initiatives that were achieved during the 2010 fiscal year.  We continued to provide support for MUNIS, completing a number of significant projects, including the expansion of centralized requisitioning. A new version of MUNIS was installed in January of 2010, requiring the installation of two new servers to accommodate the conversion to a SQL based platform. Testing began in February and we went live on April 1, 2010.  In October, two new servers and a disk storage array unit were installed to replace our older E-mail Exchange system and 130 email accounts were manually migrated over to the new system.  A new Active Directory Domain was created to properly support the new Exchange E-mail system. Additional servers were deployed to provide the necessary domain functionality and to provide increased storage and shared printing resources. As of the end of the fiscal year, nine departments had been migrated to the new network with minimal service disruptions.  A new version of the Wannacomet Water’s billing system was installed, which allows for automatic software updates helping to reduce IT support time. The electronic billing feature was also implemented using the Town’s email system.  A new server for Our Island Home was built and configured for the implementation of a new long-term care software product. The setup included the implementation of a backup solution and the installation of client software.  The Town’s website continues to be one of the primary sources of information for citizens and visitors, logging over two million hits this past year and averaging over six thousand hits per day. Nantucket was again one of the recipients of the e-Government Award with Distinction from Common Cause Page 20  In FY 2010, a total of 159 maps were created for various departments including topographical, zoning and special purpose maps for the public. Forty-eight maps were created for the Annual Town Meeting. Approximately 66,055 visitors accessed the GIS website throughout the year. In fiscal year 2011, we plan to install fiber at the Marine and Annex buildings providing a faster, more stable connection into the Town network, complete the migration to the new network, institute live streaming and on-demand video access to recorded meetings on the Town’s website in conjunction with PEG, replace Surf Control software, upgrade MUNIS and evaluate MS Office 2007 software for rollout. We will also be working on a project with WPI college students on the development of formal IT policies and procedures. Additionally, an assessment of IT services will take place resulting in a comprehensive strategic plan for technology over the next 3 to 5 years. In closing, I would like to extend my appreciation to my staff for all of their efforts throughout the year and to all Town departments for their continued support. Nantucket GIS Coordinator, Nathan Porter Receives Common Cause E-Government Award Respectfully submitted, Linda Rhodes Information Systems Administrator NANTUCKET ISLANDS LAND BANK Nantucket Islands Land Bank was established by the voters of Nantucket in 1984 for the purpose of acquiring, holding, and managing important open space resources of the Island for the use and enjoyment of the general public. Funding for the program is derived primarily from a two percent transfer fee levied against most real property transfers within Nantucket County. Fiscal year 2010 yielded $10,367,508 in transfer fee revenues compared to last years $8,582,564. The Land Bank acquired 119.34 acres of land at a cost of $5,674,383. The Land Bank now owns 2,673 acres with an additional 369 acres permanently Page 21 protected by conservation restrictions. Since its inception, the Land Bank has spent $205,300,262 on land purchases on the Island. Five elected Land Bank Commissioners serve without compensation administering the Nantucket Islands Land Bank Act (Chapter 669 of the Acts of 1983, as amended). Leslie B. Johnson April 2011 Robert L. Gardner April 2012 Allen B. Reinhard April 2013 John J. Stackpole April 2014 Philip D. Bartlett April 2015 The Commission received full-time staff support from Executive Director Eric Savetsky, Administrator/Fiscal Officer Jesse Bell, Resource Planner/Ecologist Bruce W. Perry, Assistant Property Manager Robert W. Earley, Property Supervisor Jeffrey W. Pollock, and Assistant Property Manager Edward Boynton. Part- time office staffing was provided by Assistant Administrator Susan Campese. Part-time seasonal property management was provided by Brian Paonessa. Administrator/Fiscal Officer Kathryn Hunter resigned in December 2009 after eight years of service with the Land Bank. REAL PROPERTY TRANSFERS AND FEE COLLECTION During the year the Land Bank processed 890 real property transfers having a total gross value of $594,542,034 compared to last years $454,993,430. The following graph shows transfer fee revenues since the Land Bank’s inception in 1984: Please visit our website at www.nantucketlandbank.org for further information regarding financials and land acquisitions. Respectfully submitted, John J. Stackpole Chairman Page 22 LEGISLATIVE UPDATE I am deeply honored to be writing to you again as Nantucket’s State Representative. The second half of this legislative session has not been any less challenging than the first, especially in terms of the still struggling economy and budget-crunch. That being said, we have debated and passed many important initiatives including municipal relief, school nutrition, anti- bullying, autism insurance, small business health insurance and economic development. Our local legislative agenda was generally well received and several Nantucket home rule bills were passed by the General Court and signed into law. In November of last year, the Governor signed legislation relative to Miacomet Road that permits the Town to swap land with the Land Bank Commission in order to protect archeologically sensitive areas found on the original parcel for the human services center. Soon after the New Year, An Act concerning the Historic District Commission was signed which made a minor technical change to eliminate a conflict with Robert’s Rule of Order. The act allows the Commission to now elect its Chairman and Vice-Chairman and set rules for meetings, all of which were not provided for in their enabling legislation. Late in the spring, An Act Establishing an Appointed Board of Health for the Town of Nantucket was signed into law allowing the creation of a five member Board of Health (BOH) for Nantucket. This was something that the Town had been looking to do for a number of years to alleviate the time constrain on the Board of Selectmen which has been dividing its time between issues related to the BOH and its own. Most recently, the Governor signed a piece of legislation allowing the Town of Nantucket to pay Police Officer William Higgins while he served as a military officer in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In addition to home rules this legislative session, we were able to incorporate key language into major bills that should be beneficial to Nantucket in the future. One example is legislation that transferred county sheriffs to the state. We were able to ensure that language was included in the legislation to protect a recurring revenue source for the Town's public service building. Over the debt life of the project, the Town of Nantucket will receive approximately $5 million. We were also successful in adding an outside section to this year’s fiscal budget to include a representative from the Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission (NPEDC) as a voting member on the Ocean Advisory Commission. The language amends the Oceans Act of 2008 which had previously not given the NPEDC representation on the Commission. The outside section in the budget ensures that when the Ocean Management Plan is revisited every five years, NPEDC will have a voice and a vote for Nantucket. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Robert O’Leary and his staff for their assistance in supporting these pieces of legislation. I would like to conclude by thanking the citizens of Nantucket for being involved. I am incredibly proud to represent our Island and the district as a whole in the State House. Respectfully submitted, Timothy R. Madden State Representative Barnstable, Dukes, and Nantucket District Page 23 MUNICIPAL FINANCE, DEPARTMENT OF The Department of Municipal Finance includes Assessing, Treasury, Collections, and Finance and Operations. The department operates under the requirements of Massachusetts General Law (MGL) and the Massachusetts Department of Revenue (DOR). An independent firm of Certified Public Accountants audits the Town’s financial statements annually. ASSESSING The Assessor’s office personnel (Tax Assessor plus four full-time and one part-time position) collect, compile, and verify data for the valuation of all real estate and personal property, a total of 17,897 residential, commercial, open space, personal property and exempt accounts. In addition to assessing real estate and personal property accounts, the Assessing Department processes property tax abatements, motor vehicle and boat excise taxes and abatements, statutory exemptions, residential exemptions and abutters’ notification lists. Once every three years, the DOR’s Bureau of Local Assessment does a complete review and certification of the assessment records and values of every community in the Commonwealth. The Town’s triennial certification occurred in fiscal 2010. In May, 2010, the Commissioner of Revenue certified that all real and personal property was being assessed at full and fair cash valuation. Fiscal Year 2010 values for all property were as follows: Residential properties $12,285,375,932 Mixed use properties 6,324,576,100 Commercial and industrial 1,218,017,593 Farm and recreational land 15,106,975 Open space 15,300,200 Personal property 204,631,215 Total taxable property $20,063,008,015 Exempt property 3,740,515,200 Total property assessed value $23,803,523,215 Total taxable property decreased by $756,076,997 or -3.6% compared to the previous year. Assessment data is available to the public on the Town’s website at http://www.nantucket-ma.gov. The Town’s levy limit in 2010 was $52,503,548, an increase of $1,947,405 or 3.85%. The increase came from the allowable 2½ % increase, which yielded revenue of $1,263,904 and certified new growth which yielded revenue of $683,501. Levy Base (previous fiscal year’s Levy Limit) $50,556,143 Proposition 2½ 1,263,904 Revenue from Certified New Growth 683,501 Fiscal Year 2010 Levy Limit (next fiscal year’s Levy Base) $52,503,548 Debt Exclusion 8,890,665 Fiscal Year 2010 Maximum Levy $61,394,213 Page 24 The actual tax levy for FY 2010 was $61,333,595, an increase of $2,823,453 or 4.8% over the previous year. In addition to the allowable increases to the levy limit noted above, the tax revenue for debt on voter approved projects increased in 2010 by $835,516. Property tax abatements granted on the 2010 tax levy during the abatement period totaled $1,101,654, or 1.8% of the levy. Tax rates for fiscal year 2010 were: Residential $3.01 Open Space $2.88 Commercial $5.35 Industrial $5.35 Personal Property $5.35 For comparison, the average residential tax rate in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 2010 was $12.33. Nantucket’s composite tax rate was $3.06. This is the rate that would be charged if the community used a single rate structure. One penny on the composite tax rate yielded $203,967, compared to $212,592 in fiscal year 2009. A residential exemption is available for year round residents, as authorized by MGL. Average values and taxes on residential properties are listed in the next chart. Assessed Value Less: Residential Exemption Taxed Value Real Estate Tax Nantucket year-round residential $1,298,211 $360,135 $938,076 $2,824 Massachusetts average residential 1 $373,628 N/A $373,628 $4,117 Nantucket all residential $1,800,673 N/A $1,800,673 $5,420 1 http://www.mass.gov/Ador/docs/dls/mdmstuf/PropertyTax/bill10.xls. State average does NOT include Nantucket and the fourteen other communities that have a split residential/commercial tax rate. The Town’s levy ceiling under Proposition 2½ is the maximum amount that could be raised through property taxes with voter approval, and is equivalent to a tax rate of $25. For FY 2010, that amount was $501,575,200 resulting in override capacity of $440,241,605. TREASURY and COLLECTIONS The Collector’s office personnel (Collector plus two positions) bill and collect for real estate, personal property, motor vehicle excise and boat excise taxes and landfill bills. In addition, they process police and fire off-duty bills, departmental receipts for the Town and County, process lockbox payments, and prepare municipal lien certificates for property sales or transfers. Tax collections were $60,114,004 or 98% of the levy. This amount includes collections of delinquent taxes and tax liens. Property tax revenue represented 81% of revenue for the general operating fund. Other revenue for the general operating fund of the town for FY 2010 is as follows, shown with FY 2009 for comparison: Page 25 Other Revenue 2010 2009 Excise Taxes – motor vehicle, room, boat $2,845,363 $3,493,433 Our Island Home / ACDC charges & Medicaid receipts $3,627,591 $3,455,477 Licenses, permits, rentals & fees $2,073,025 $2,081,626 Penalties, interest, fines & forfeits $910,113 $989,464 Intergovernmental payments $2,518,401 $1,188,459 Other income $274,180 $275,188 State Funding $1,704,342 $2,252,249 Total other revenue $13,953,015 $13,735,896 The Treasurer’s office personnel (Treasurer plus two positions) process payroll for the Town, County, Nantucket Regional Transit Authority (NRTA) and Land Bank, handle employee and retiree medical insurance, invest Town funds as allowable by law, collect on or close liened tax accounts, make all debt service payments, and work with our financial advisor and bond counsel on the financial disclosure related to issuing new debt and SEC required reporting for outstanding debt. MGL defines allowable borrowing purposes, maximum terms, limitations to overall debt, and types of borrowing that are inside or outside a legally defined debt limit. The debt limit for inside debt is 5% of Equalized Value (EQV) as determined by the Commonwealth, biannually. Nantucket’s proposed 2010 EQV is $22 billion, the 4th highest in the Commonwealth, and the debt limit is $1.1 billion. The Town’s long-term debt outstanding on June 30, 2010 consists of Governmental Funds debt of $76,616,294 and Enterprise Fund debt of $76,121,553. Changes in general long-term debt during the year are shown in the following chart. Additional detail is available in the audit report (note that for audit report purposes, any short term borrowing at year end, which was converted to long term debt prior to the issuance of the audit report, is reported as long term debt at year end, in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Practices (GAAP). This chart does not follow GAAP reporting conventions. Balance Balance Description 06/30/2009 Additions Reductions 06/30/2010 Governmental Funds $71,324,797 $13,070,000 $7,778,503 $76,616,294 Enterprise Funds: Siasconset Water 7,858,000 1,400,000 423,000 8,835,000 Wannacomet Water 20,435,000 1,800,000 1,215,000 21,020,000 Nantucket Memorial Airport 2,850,000 - 730,000 2,120,000 Sewer 47,255,442 120,000 4,093,889 43,281,553 Solid Waste 975,000 - 110,000 865,000 Total Enterprise Funds 79,373,442 3,320,000 6,571,889 76,121,553 Total Long Term Debt $150,698,239 $16,390,000 $14,350,392 $152,737,847 Governmental fund debt consists primarily of General Fund debt, and includes obligations on behalf of the Nantucket Island Land Bank and the Sewer Enterprise Fund. Long term debt was issued during the year at an effective interest rate of 3.25%. Moody’s Investors Service affirmed the Town’s Aa3 rating on long-term debt, stating that the Aa3 rating reflects the Town’s substantial tax base, healthy financial position, and modest debt burden. Moody’s noted, however, anticipated medium-term pressure and challenges to structural balance resulting from decreased revenue growth and expenditure pressures from personnel costs, solid waste disposal costs, and nursing home operations. Page 26 Reductions of debt include restructuring of borrowing from Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust for the Surfside Waste Water Treatment Facility, which reduced debt outstanding for the General Fund and the Sewer Enterprise Fund. The Town’s debt is structured to retire 58% of principal within ten years. Changes in short term debt outstanding during the year are shown in the following chart: Balance Balance Description 06/30/2009 Additions Reductions 06/30/2010 Sewer Fund $5,015,510 - $1,009,510 $4,006,000 Siasconset Water 1,400,000 - 1,400,000 - Wannacomet Water 1,800,000 - 1,800,000 - Nantucket Memorial Airport 25,562,725 24,916,500 25,562,725 24,916,500 Total short term debt $33,778,235 $24,916,500 $29,772,235 $28,922,500 Changes in authorized but unissued debt during fiscal 2010 were: Balance Balance Authorized but unissued debt: 06/30/2009 Additions Reductions 06/30/2010 Governmental Funds $15,019,250 $0 $13,320,000 $1,699,250 Enterprise Funds: Siasconset Water 1,400,000 2,600,000 1,400,000 2,600,000 Wannacomet Water 2,050,000 2,050,000 1,800,000 2,300,000 Nantucket Memorial Airport 22,718,600 4,100,000 26,818,600 Sewer 39,390,089 3,320,000 36,070,089 Solid Waste 1,683,000 1,683,000 Total Enterprise Funds 67,241,689 8,750,000 6,520,000 69,471,689 Total Authorized but Unissued: $82,260,939 $8,750,000 $19,840,000 $71,170,939 Reductions of authorizations include debt issuance (not previously borrowed short term) and actions by Annual Town Meeting. FINANCE and OPERATIONS Finance and Operations department personnel (Director plus seven positions) manage vendor payments, manage property and liability insurance coverage and claims for the Town, County, Land Bank and NRTA, maintain budget and accounting records for all fund and account groups, prepare financial reports to meet local, state and federal requirements, participate in union negotiations, provide support for the budgetary process, and coordinate the annual audit of financial operations for the Town and County of Nantucket. Special revenue funds receive revenues from federal and state grants, and from fee-based programs. Revenues are legally restricted for a specific purpose. Capital projects are funded from proceeds of general obligation bond issues, from federal and state grants, or from transfers from the general operating fund, authorized by Town Meeting. The Town of Nantucket had five enterprise funds (Nantucket Memorial Airport, Wannacomet Water Company, Siasconset Water, Sewer and Solid Waste) in fiscal 2010. Enterprise funds are established to show the full cost of operations for business type activities, and user charges provide a substantial portion of revenues. In lieu of residential user charges for solid waste operations, the Town of Nantucket provides Page 27 funds to operate the landfill from general tax revenue. The total provided in Fiscal 2010 was $4,479,471 comprised of $2,785,471 in operating overrides, approved by the voters at Annual and Special Town Meetings, with additional subsidy from the general fund in the amount of $1,694,000. For the fiscal 2010 budget, an additional $500,000 from certified free cash was approved at the 2009 Annual Town Meeting for landfill mining. Health insurance coverage and workers compensation insurance are self-funded by the Town of Nantucket. Health insurance coverage extends to employees, retirees, and their families. The insurance funds are recorded as an Internal Service fund, in keeping with GAAP. Revenue in the health insurance fund consists of premiums paid by the employer, employees, retirees, and COBRA participants, and interest. Under the Preferred Provider plan, the employer pays 90% of the premium. Under the traditional Indemnity plan, the employer pays 80% of the premium. Expenses in the health insurance fund consist of medical claims paid, re-insurance premiums to protect against medical claims in excess of $150,000, and administration costs. The Premiums paid by the Town and its enterprise funds totaled $7,585,014. This includes $1,541,996 for retiree coverage. Employees’ and retirees’ payments for coverage totaled $1,271,645. Premiums paid by other employers in the plan (County, Land Bank, and NRTA) totaled $175,930 including employee share. Former employees participating under Federal COBRA regulations paid $91,791 into the plan. At June 30, 2010, the balance in the Stabilization Fund was $3,411,511, up from $38,000 at the beginning of fiscal 2006. The Town began funding the Stabilization Fund in 2006, after the development and approval of a Stabilization Fund policy. In February 2010, Moody’s Investors Service commented positively on the policy and on the Town’s adherence to the policy. During fiscal 2009, an organizational review of the finance department was completed. The thirty-six implementation points in the resulting report provided a roadmap and priority list for Town Administration and the department to further refine fiscal operations across all Town departments and enterprise funds, over a three year period, through fiscal 2012. Strategic adjustments made in 2009 provided staffing levels and training at the appropriate level to meet the financial responsibilities of the Town. As implementation continues in 2011 and 2012 across multiple departments, we look forward to increasing the level of service and professionalism to the staff and citizens of the Town and County of Nantucket. PERSONNEL In January, 2010, Lavon Day, a valued member of the Finance Department and long time Town employee, passed away after a lengthy illness. Lavon’s family and friends raised funds to plant a memorial tree on Federal Street, visible from the office where she had capably handled her payroll responsibilities. We miss Lavon, and we extend our heartfelt sympathy to her family. In March 2010, Krista Lewis was promoted to the position of Payroll Administrator, under the direction of the Treasurer. In May of 2010 we welcomed Linda MacDonald to the Finance Department as the Payroll Clerk. I want to express sincere thanks to my staff for all of their efforts throughout the year and to Town Manager Libby Gibson and to all Town departments for their support. And I thank many people throughout the Town, on boards, commissions and in the public, for their expressions of support for the work done by the Finance Department. Page 28 Respectfully submitted, Constance Voges Finance Director TOWN MANAGER The Charter for the Town of Nantucket outlines fifteen specific duties for the position of Town Manager. These duties include: oversight of town departments; appointments; collective bargaining negotiations and other personnel-related matters; preparation of the annual budget and Town Meeting warrants; and, implementation of policy set forth by the Board of Selectmen. All departments, except for the School, Airport and Water departments, are contained within the purview of Town Administration. Personnel The position of Assistant Town Manager, which was vacated by Malachy Rice in December of 2009, was filled by Gregg Tivnan who started in March of 2010. Gregg has a strong municipal and financial background and had most recently worked for the Executive Office of Administration and Finance for the Commonwealth. Gregg has also worked for the Boston City Council and Mayor’s Office. We are happy to welcome him to our administrative team. 2009 - 2010 Town Meetings/Budget A special town meeting was held on September 21, 2009 at which 30 articles were considered. Among the most significant were the acceptances of two local option revenue initiatives which had been recently enacted by the state: a local meals tax increase of .75% and an increase in the local hotel/motel room occupancy tax from four percent to six percent. These two initiatives were recommended by the Ad Hoc Fiscal Committee, a group which was recommended by Town Administration and appointed by the Board of Selectmen at the end of FY 2009 to examine new revenue options, potential cost efficiency measures and to recommend criteria for essential town services. The Committee met throughout the summer and issued a final report in October of 2009 (which is posted on the Town’s website http://www.nantucket- ma.gov/Pages/NantucketMA_Finance/Final%20Report.pdf). Effects of the national economic decline were felt on Nantucket in early FY 2009. The national recession, which began during the summer of 2008, caused a significant decline in local revenue receipts, including landfill revenue. For FY 2010 it was necessary to reduce the General Fund budget because of structural issues relating to the decline in revenue and increasing expenses. While approximately $140,000 in new revenue was identified through fee increases, the FY 2010 budget gap was closed primarily through budget reductions including:  a wage freeze for FY 2010 agreed to by the Town’s largest union (Laborer’s Union) as well as the non-union Town employees, and concessions from the DPW union;  elimination of funding for several vacancies resulting from a hiring freeze implemented in November of 2008;  the layoff of 4 positions at Our Island Home;  an across-the-board reduction to the Police Department’s personnel budget; and a reduction in the Fire Department’s overtime budget; Page 29  a reduction in hours for some positions; and  a 10% reduction in departmental expense budgets As a result of the Town’s hiring freeze and actions taken with the FY 2010 budget, the Town reduced its workforce by 22 positions, which is an 8% reduction. The FY 2011 budget was also a challenge. At the 2010 annual town meeting, the recommended FY 11 General Fund budget was approved, with the following actions taken to balance the budget:  the second year of a five-year landfill mining project was funded through Free Cash (cost of approximately $631,000) rather than the General Fund  the health insurance projection was reduced  a required minimum capital funding amount was eliminated from the General Fund budget and funded through appropriations from Free Cash  the projected Reserve Fund was reduced  various expense reductions were made in departmental operating budgets  continuation of hiring freeze Town Administration also began to review possible long-term efficiencies and cost-savings measures that could be explored further or implemented in FY 2012, including departmental consolidation options. The 2010 Annual Town Meeting warrant contained 95 articles, which were mostly comprised of appropriations, zoning, real estate dispositions, bylaw amendments and home rule petitions. Town Meeting also approved a number of capital projects, including: funding for design, repairs & improvements to school buildings; additional design money for the Hummock Pond Road bicycle path; replacement and possible relocation of the fuel dispensation system currently located at the Fire Department; a replacement fire engine, and professional services relating to renovation of the (soon to be) former police station building at 20 South Water Street. Funding was also approved for preliminary design of a waste water treatment facility in Madaket. A Town-sponsored home rule petition to expand the hotel/motel room occupancy tax to seasonal vacation rentals, failed. Significant Projects/Issues FY 2010 was the second year the Town participated in Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s (WPI) Interactive Qualifying Project Program. This program is intended provide students with an understanding of the social effects of technology by working on real world programs. This year, the students worked on two projects for the Town: research regarding the concept of a Smart Grid for the Town and an evaluation of the feasibility of an electric vehicle program. The students’ final report may be found on the Town’s website. Toward the end of FY 2010, the Town and several of its unions collaborated in an effort to engage Harvard Law School’s Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program to work on a project involving how the labor groups and the Town’s administration could work more productively and effectively in the collective bargaining process. The final report is due at the end of 2010. Progress continued on construction of the new public safety facility at 4 Fairgrounds Road throughout FY 2010. Completion is expected at the end of 2010. At some point, serious consideration needs to be given to Page 30 incorporating the Fire Department into the facility, as originally planned due to severe space and working condition limitations at the current main Fire Department location. Improvements continue with Town finance processes, following the issuance of a report as to the organization and internal controls of the Finance Department in September of 2008. For the first time in recent memory, the Town’s free cash was certified much earlier than usual – before the development of the budget, in September of 2009. The FY 2009 audit was completed at the beginning of January, 2010 -- very close to our internal deadline of December 31, 2009. Also for the first time in recent memory, the Town received an unqualified opinion from its auditor for the FY 2009 audit. Finance staff is to be commended for these noteworthy achievements. Toward the end of FY 2010, the Town received a grant from the state’s Clean Energy Center in the amount of $390,000 for design and professional services relating to a proposed wind turbine at the Madaket landfill. The former communications tower which had been adjacent to the landfill for many years was removed to make way for this project. In FY 2011, we expect to engage consulting and other services to conduct the necessary feasibility studies and analysis in connection with this project, including noise, visual, wetlands, endangered species, avian, interconnection and net metering studies. A number of other energy-related projects are also under consideration, including solar arrays at various municipal locations, smart grid exploration, electric vehicle recharging stations and tidal energy between Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. Additional information about all of these projects may be found at www.ackenergy.org. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the Board of Selectmen, my immediate staff, specifically Malachy Rice (former Assistant Town Manager), Gregg Tivnan (Assistant Town Manager), Diane O’Neil (Projects Manager), Anne McAndrew (Licensing Agent) and Erika Mooney (Executive Assistant to the Town Manager); and, the department heads for their support and assistance throughout the year. I also extend thanks to the Town employees for their efforts to serve the Town. There is a lot of hard work that goes into making Nantucket a great place to live and work that often goes unseen. Of course, the support of the Nantucket community is always appreciated. Respectfully submitted, C. Elizabeth Gibson Town Manager P.S. Please consider subscribing to my e-newsletter started during FY 2010, the link on the Town’s website is http://www.nantucket-ma.gov/Pages/NantucketMA_Admin/CurrentNewsletter/currentNewsletter.htm. TOWN CLERK Assistant Town Clerk Nancy Holmes, Administrative Assistant Peggy Altreuter and I have had a very good year! We have accomplished a lot, and survived implementing a challenging group of new Massachusetts laws and regulations. The changes that will affect all public servants are those to the Open Meeting Law and state Ethics. Several trainings have been held, and more will follow. Anyone with questions should call us at the office at (508) 228-7217. Page 31 We continue to gain documentation of our residents via the Steamship Authority’s requirement that residents wishing a substantial discount to travel by ferry be listed in the Nantucket Street List. We gained around 500 person’s names during the first year, and almost 150 so far this year. Many thanks to our Steamship Authority representative H. Flint Ranney for helping to shepherd in this important new regulation. By the time you read this, Federal Census 2010 will be concluded, and our population will be known to us. Last year, after a successful challenge to their estimate, they conceded that we have at least 11,060 residents. Thank you to Finance Committee member Peter Morrison for his valuable assistance. Of course, people continue to let us know that they weren’t contacted, so we are keeping track of those names and addresses just in case the government tells us we have less residents than I believe we do. Much of our state and federal funding depends upon our ability to document each and every resident, particularly regarding recovery funds in the event of any disaster. After each Decennial Census, reapportionment of Representative and Congressional Districts takes place. In 2000, through the Board of Selectmen, I asked for Special Legislation to allow Nantucket to remain one voting district. This allows us to remain as one precinct, without ever having to divide into three, or even four voting precincts. This will translate into savings of many thousands of dollars for years to come. It has been a very exciting year for me, personally. I have another granddaughter, Kiera Elizabeth, and I was honored to be installed as President of the New England Association of City and Town Clerks at their annual Conference in Vermont in November of 2009. As President of the New England Clerks, I attended my first International Annual Conference in Reno, Nevada. The speakers and workshops were incredibly motivational and informative. As always, with any conferences I attend, the courses of study, as well as the networks established with other municipal clerks, provide an inexhaustible vault of information that enables the Town Clerk’s office to serve you better. No matter what your questions are, if we don’t know the answers, we know where to find them! We truly appreciate all the support that has been given to the Town Clerk’s office by the residents and voters. Your enthusiastic encouragement makes our job a joy. We look forward to serving you for another year. As always, if there is anything that we can do to serve you better, let us know. I don’t mind being contacted at home. I’d rather you call me than worry about something, especially over a weekend. There are no silly questions! The bylaws and zoning information for the Town of Nantucket are always available online at http://www.generalcode.com and may be accessed directly from the Town website: http://www.nantucket- ma.gov. ELECTIONS AND TOWN MEETINGS HELD ON NANTUCKET IN FISCAL YEAR 2010 SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 7,682 registered voters 1,237 ballots cast 16% percentage voting Dec. 8, 2009 SENATOR IN CONGRESS REPUBLICAN Scott Brown 218 ballots Page 32 Jack E. Robinson Blanks Write-ins DEMOCRAT Michael Capuano Martha Coakley Alan Khazei Stephen Pagliuca Blanks Write-ins 73 ballots 0 ballots 5 ballots 212 ballots 479 ballots 144 ballots 104 ballots 0 ballots 1 ballot SPECIAL STATE ELECTION TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 7,712 registered voters 4,235 ballots cast 54% percentage voting Jan. 19, 2010 SENATOR IN CONGRESS Scott Brown Martha Coakley Joseph L. Kennedy Blanks Write-ins 2,032 ballots 2,139 ballots 58 ballots 2 ballots 4 ballots ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 7,712 registered voters 2,626 ballots cast 34% percentage voting April 13, 2010 MODERATOR Sarah F. Alger Blanks Write-ins TOWN CLERK Catherine Flanagan Stover Blanks Write-ins SELECTMAN Allen Reinhard Patricia Ann Roggeveen Carol Dunton Whiting Willauer Clifford J. Williams Blanks Write-ins SCHOOL COMMITTEE Jeanette Garneau Blanks Write-ins HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION John F. McLaughlin Linda F. Williams Kevin B. Keuster Blanks Write-ins 2,227 ballots 378 ballots 21 ballots 2,218 ballots 396 ballots 12 ballots 1,074 ballots 1,421 ballots 435 ballots 1,088 ballots 779 ballots 437 ballots 18 ballots 1,991 ballots 614 ballots 21 ballots 1,657 ballots 1,417 ballots 1,407 ballots 748 ballots 23 ballots Page 33 HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION ASSOCIATE - 3 YR Dawn Hill-Holdgate Blanks Write-ins NANTUCKET HOUSING AUTHORITY Bertyl Johnson Blanks Write-ins NANTUCKET LAND BANK COMMISSION Phillip D. Bartlett Blanks Write-ins HARBOR AND SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD Peter B. Boyce Wendy McCrae Blanks Write-ins Michael Glowacki by write-in votes PLANNING BOARD Sylvia D. Howard Jean Lawrence Wagley Blanks Write-ins 1,979 ballots 630 ballots 17 ballots 1,905 ballots 695 ballots 26 ballots 1,892 ballots 708 ballots 26 ballots 1,876 ballots 1,719 ballots 3,985 ballots 298 ballots 1,310 ballots 1,138 ballots 175 ballots 3 ballots SPECIAL TOWN MEETING – SEPTEMBER 21, 2009 The following is a summary of the articles called, and the vote taken by the 2009 Special Town Meeting held at the Nantucket High School, Mary P. Walker Auditorium, 10 Surfside Road, on September 21, 2009. Monday, September 21 – Meeting called to order at 6:15 PM with 622 voters present. There were ultimately 774 voters present. At the close of Voter Registration there were 7,632 voters. The quorum requirements for the meeting are 229 and 382. Article 1: Fiscal Year 2010 General Fund Operating Budget Adjustments. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote [quorum of 3% needed = 229]. Article 2: Fiscal Year 2010 Enterprise Fund Operating Budget Adjustments. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 3: Appropriation: FY2010 Police and Fire Special Detail Fund. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote [quorum of 3% needed = 229]. Article 4: Appropriation: Unpaid Bills. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote [quorum of 3% needed = 229]. Article 5: Re-appropriation: Prior Year Articles. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote [quorum of 5% needed = 382]. Page 34 Article 6: Appropriation: Collective Bargaining Agreement/Laborer’s Union. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 7: Acceptance of Massachusetts General Law: Local Option Meals Tax. (Called) adopted by hand count vote: YES – 464; NO – 304. Article 8: Acceptance of Massachusetts General Law: Amend Local Room Occupancy Excise Tax. (Called) adopted by hand count vote: YES – 398; NO – 386. Article 9: Appropriation: Adult Community Day Care Program. (Called) positive sense-of-the-meeting adopted by voice vote. Article 10: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Age Restriction. (Called) adopted by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 11: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Operating Entity. (Called) adopted by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 12: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Skilled Nursing. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 13: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Unit Ownership. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 14: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Major Site Plan Review. (Called) adopted by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 15: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Affordable Housing. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 16: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Definitions and Special Districts. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted as moved by planning board by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 17: Real Estate Disposition: Sherburne Commons. (Called) adopted by 2/3 hand count vote: YES – 517; NO – 134 [2/3 = 434]. Article 18: Zoning Map Change: Madaket RC to VTEC. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 19: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to LUG-3. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 20: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to VR. (Called) adopted by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 21: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to LUG-1. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Page 35 Article 22: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Height. (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 23: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Height Exemptions. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 24: Real Estate Conveyance: North Pasture. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 25: Real Estate Acquisition and Conveyance: North Pasture. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 26: Real Estate Acquisition: Western Avenue. (Called) not adopted by hand count vote: YES – 287; NO – 171 [2/3 = 305]. Article 27: Miller Lane Access. (Not Called) “moved that no action be taken” by unanimous voice vote. Article 28: Appropriation Reduction: Police Station. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote [quorum of 5% needed = 382]. Article 29: Size Reduction: Police Station. (Called) not adopted by declared 2/3 majority voice vote [quorum of 5% needed = 382]. Article 30: Bylaw Amendment: Town Meeting Quorum Requirement. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote. It was moved that the following articles be voted in accordance with the motions recommended by the Finance Committee or, in the absence of a Finance Committee motion, then in accordance with the motions as recommended by the Planning Board, as printed in the Finance Committee Report, with technical amendments brought forward during the course of the meeting: Articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 21, 23, 24, 25, and 27. The September 21, 2009 Special Town Meeting was dissolved at 10:17 PM. ANNUAL TOWN MEETING – APRIL 5, 2010 The following is a summary of the articles called and discussed, and the vote taken by the 2010 Annual Town Meeting held at the Nantucket High School, Mary P. Walker Auditorium, 10 Surfside Road, on April 5- 7, 2010. There were 503, 495, and 217 voters present, respectively, each night. Article 1: Receipt of Reports. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 2: Appropriation: Unpaid Bills. (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 3: Appropriation: Prior Year Articles. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 4: Revolving Accounts: Annual Authorization. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Page 36 Article 5: Appropriation: Reserve Fund. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 6: FY 2010 Budget Transfers. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 7: Personnel Compensation Plans for FY 2011. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 8: Appropriation: FY 2011 General Operating Budget. (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 9: Appropriation: Health and Human Services. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 10: Appropriation: General Fund Capital Expenditures. (Not Called) adopted by majority voice vote. Article 11: Acceptance of Massachusetts General Law to Establish Separate Enterprise Fund for Our Island Home. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 12: Appropriation: Enterprise Funds Operation. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 13: Appropriation: Enterprise Funds Capital Expenditures. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 14: Enterprise Funds: Fiscal Year 2010 Budget Transfers. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 15: Appropriation: FY 2010 Police and Fire Special Detail Fund. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 16: Waterways Improvement Fund. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 17: Appropriation: County Assessment. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 18: Appropriation: Finalizing Fiscal Year 2011 County Budget. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 19: Rescind Unused Borrowing Authority. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 20: Appropriation: Ferry Embarkation Fee. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 21: Appropriation: Collective Bargaining Agreement/Our Island Home. (Not Called) take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 22: Appropriation: Collective Bargaining Agreement/Fire. (Not Called) take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 23: Appropriation: Collective Bargaining Agreement/Airport. (Not Called) take no action by unanimous voice vote. Page 37 Article 24: Appropriation: Collective Bargaining Agreement/Wannacomet Water. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 25: Fiscal Year 2011 Budget Transfers: Community Preservation Committee/Beaugrand. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 26: Appropriation: Community Preservation Committee/Beaugrand. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 27: Appropriation: Adult Community Day Care/Topham. (Not Called) moved to take no action, contained within Article 11, by unanimous voice vote Article 28: Appropriation: Plan for Polpis Bike Path/David. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote; Board of Selectmen to convene a committee to address. Article 29: Parking in the Core District/Mehringer. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 30: Establish Local Procurement Study Committee/Bridier. (Called) adopted as moved by Hamel by majority voice vote. Article 31: Bylaw Amendments: Sewers and Sewer Districts. (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 32: Bylaw Amendment: Wharves and Waterways. (Called) adopted as amended by DeCosta by unanimous voice vote. Article 33: Bylaw Amendment: Council for Human Services. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 34: Bylaw Amendment: Nantucket Public Construction Projects/Baker. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 35: Bylaw: Property Owned by the Town of Nantucket, Management of/Collier. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 36: Bylaw Amendment: Streets and Sidewalks/David. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote; Board of Selectmen to convene a committee to address. Article 37: Bylaw Amendment: Bicycles and Mopeds/Lydon. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote. Article 38: Bylaw Amendment: Board of Sewer Commissioners/Sewer District Map Changes. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 39: Bylaw Amendment: Board of Sewer Commissioners/Siasconset Sewer District Map Changes/Dale. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Page 38 Article 40: Bylaw Amendment: Board of Sewer Commissioners/Town Sewer District/Hilts, (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 41: Bylaw Amendment: Coastal Properties Owned by the Town, Management of/Stover. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 42: Bylaw Amendment: Swimming Pools, Private. (Called) adopted as amended by Roggeveen by majority voice vote. Article 43: Zoning Change: Split Zoning District Corrections – Various Locations. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 44: Zoning Change: Eel Point Road. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 45: Zoning Change: Appleton Road. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 46: Zoning Change: Fairgrounds Road and Old South Road. (Called) tabled by 2/3 majority hand count vote: YES – 237; NO – 60; total 297 (YES = 80%). Article 47: Zoning Change: West Miacomet Road and Somerset Road. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 48: Zoning Change: Miacomet Golf Club. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 49: Zoning Change: South Pasture. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 50: Zoning Change: Surfside Area Plan – Surfside West. (Called) adopted by 2/3 majority hand count vote: YES – 306; NO – 128; total 434 (YES = 71%). Article 51: Zoning Change: Surfside Area Plan – Surfside South. (Called) not adopted by majority hand count vote: YES – 185; NO – 190; total 374. Article 52: Zoning Change: Somerset Road and Somerset Lane. (Called) adopted by 2/3 majority hand count vote: YES – 280; NO – 115; total 395 (YES = 71%). Article 53: Zoning Change: Monomoy. (Called) not adopted by majority hand count vote: YES – 219; NO – 142; total: 361. Article 54: Zoning Change: Intensity Regulations – Residential 5 (R-5). (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 55: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Intensity Regulations – Swimming Pools. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote. Article 56: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Secondary Dwelling/Williams. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Page 39 Article 57: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Residential Districts/Exemptions/Collier. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 58: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Residential Districts/Permitted Uses/Collier. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 59: Home Rule Petition: Land Bank Real Estate Conveyance. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 60: Home Rule Petition: Community Housing Bank. (Called) not adopted by majority hand count vote: YES – 178; NO – 183. Article 61: Home Rule Petition: Nantucket Islands Land Bank Amendment. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 62: Home Rule Petition: Harbor and Shellfish Advisory Board. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 63: Home Rule Petition: Ocean Management Planning Process. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 64: Home Rule Petition: Separate Board of Health. (Not Called) not adopted by unanimous voice vote; not needed as state legislature has approved. Article 65: Home Rule Petition: Pay for William J. Higgins. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 66: Home Rule Petition: Expansion of Room Occupancy Tax to Vacation Rentals. (Called) not adopted by majority hand count vote: YES – 164; NO – 217. Article 67: Home Rule Petition: Conveyance of Land from County to Town. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 68: Home Rule Petition: An Act Regulating the Content and Application of Fertilizer Used in the Town of Nantucket. (Called) adopted as moved by Smith and amended by Kopko by majority hand count vote: YES – 186; NO – 102. Article 69: Home Rule Petition: Nantucket Sewer Act Amendment. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote. Article 70: Home Rule Petition: Establishing a Cemetery Commission for the Town of Nantucket/Stover. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 71: Acceptance of Massachusetts General Law: Other Post-employment Benefits Liability Trust Fund. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Page 40 Article 72: Real Estate Acquisition: Pine Street, Siasconset. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 73: Real Estate Disposition: Pine Street, Siasconset. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 74: Real Estate Acquisition: Connections to Connections to Siasconset Bluffwalk. (Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 75: Real Estate Conveyances: Siasconset Bluffwalk. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 76: Real Estate Acquisition: “Paper” Streets, Surfside. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 77: Real Estate Conveyances: “Paper” Streets, Surfside. (Called, Call Withdrawn) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 78: Real Estate Acquisition: Paper Streets in Surfside. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 79: Real Estate Conveyances: Paper Streets, Surfside. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 80: Real Estate Acquisition: Various Parcels, Cisco. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 81: Real Estate Conveyance: Various Parcels. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 82: Real Estate Disposition: West Dover Street. (Called) not adopted by majority voice vote. Article 83: Real Estate Conveyance: Miller Way; former Nonantum Avenue parcel and West Tristram Avenue. (Called) adopted as amended by Williams by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Article 84: Real Estate Acquisition: Gardner Road. (Called, Call Withdrawn) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 85: Real Estate Disposition: Gardner Road. (Called, Call Withdrawn) moved to take no action unanimous voice vote. Article 86: Real Estate Disposition: 42R Sparks Avenue a/k/a Cow Pond Lane. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 87: Real Estate Dispositions: Low Beach Road, Monohansett Road, Arkansas Avenue and Nobadeer Avenue. (Called) adopted as amended by Collier by declared 2/3 majority voice vote. Page 41 Article 88: Real Estate Disposition: Long-term Lease Authorization, 2 Fairgrounds Road. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 89: Real Estate Conveyance: Easements/2 and 4 Fairgrounds Road. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 90: Real Estate Conveyance: Easement/Harborview Way. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 91: Real Estate Conveyance: Easement/Airport. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 92: Real Estate Conveyance: North Pasture/Holdgate. (Called) adopted as amended by 2/3 majority hand count vote: YES – 167; NO – 19 (YES = 90%). Article 93: Real Estate Conveyance: South Pasture/Brown. (Not Called) adopted by unanimous voice vote. Article 94: Appropriation: Stabilization Fund. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. Article 95: Appropriation: Free Cash. (Not Called) moved to take no action by unanimous voice vote. It was moved that the following articles be voted in accordance with the motions recommended by the Finance Committee or, in the absence of a Finance Committee motion, then in accordance with the motions as recommended by the Planning Board, as printed in the Finance Committee Report, with technical amendments brought forward during the course of the meeting: Articles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 33, 34, 35, 38, 39, 41, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 67, 70, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 93, 94, and 95. The 2010 Annual Town Meeting was dissolved at 8:35 PM on April 7, 2010. Respectfully submitted, Catherine Flanagan Stover, MMC, CMMC Town and County Clerk TOWN COUNSEL Fiscal year 2010 was a busy and productive year, and the following occurred: Land Acquisitions and Dispositions During FY 2010 Town Counsel implemented several acquisitions or conveyances of property by the Town, County and Land Bank as follows:  Assisted the Town in connection with the reuse of the 2 Fairgrounds Road property and the possible acquisition of land by Miacomet Pond. Page 42  Assisted the Town in the use of Town property located east of the Airport for a planned industrial site.  Assisted in the conveyance of property to Nantucket Housing Authority for affordable housing purposes.  Assisted with conservation restrictions on public and private land.  Continued assisting the Town in its implementation of its Yard Sale Program (disposal of small parcels of land to be added to neighbor’s “yards”) and the Siasconset Beach Preservation Fund, Inc. erosion control project.  Assisted with acquisition of property, easements and rights of way, and with regulatory and liability issues for bike paths and for various road layouts including Miller Lane, Old South Road, Cliff Road and multiple ways in Surfside, and assisted with the “One Big Beach” easement program.  Assisted the Airport Commission with issues involving the southern boundary of the Airport, and assisted with the transfer of the Town’s interest in Muskeget Island for Muskeget Island as a whole to be protected by conservation restrictions. Collective Bargaining We assisted the Town with general employee/personnel matters and in connection with collective bargaining with the Town’s employee unions during fiscal year 2010. We provided advice and assistance to Town staff regarding negotiations with the Fire and AFSCME (Our Island Home) bargaining units. Fiscal year 2010 presented particular challenges with employee unions because of an unprecedented fiscal crisis. We assisted Town staff in their efforts to renegotiate changes in the labor contracts, allowing the Town to provide adequate services within reduced budgets while avoiding major layoffs. The Fire Union contract was unresolved as of June 30, 2010 and the Union requested intervention by the Commonwealth’s Joint Labor Management Committee. Mediation through the JLMC was not successful and an arbitration hearing will be scheduled, most likely in the fall, 2010. We provided advice from time to time during the year regarding the interpretation and application of existing collective bargaining agreements, including employee grievances, and the processing of both union and non-union grievances. In addition, several non- union personnel issues, including disciplinary proceedings, occurred during this year. New Laws Various proposed legislation was composed for presentation to the state legislature. We further assisted in the preparation of numerous Nantucket bylaws and amendments thereto, as presented to the Town in the Warrant for Town Meetings and various rules and regulations as adopted by Town agencies, including amendments to taxi regulations, Board of Health Septic Management Regulations and establishment of an affordable housing trust. Advice and Legal Documents We assisted the Town Meeting process by helping with the warrant articles for inclusion on the warrant, with preparation of motions to act upon the articles, and with the deliberative processes/parliamentary procedure at Town Meeting. We aided in the preparations of election warrants and ballot questions. We assisted the Board of Selectmen with procedures for hearings, including Historic District Commission (HDC) appeals to the Board. Numerous advisory opinions were rendered throughout the year to various Town officials and boards relating to a wide variety of issues and subjects. We conducted seminars for the new open meeting law, and we conducted presentations on MGL c. 40B Comprehensive Permits and assisted in workshops on the implementation of the new Nantucket Sewer Act. Frequent and ongoing attention was given to reviewing and drafting numerous contract documents and agreements, zoning and Page 43 building issues, easements, conservation restrictions, procurement documents, leases, warrants for Town meetings, license agreements, certain decisions by regulatory boards, wind farm and other environmental issues, the legal ramifications of coastal erosion and accretion including unsafe storm damaged structures poised to fall unto the beaches, affordable housing issues, issues relating to Community Preservation Act funding, jurisdiction over Nantucket ponds, HDC enforcement activities, tick-borne disease control issues and issues related to cemeteries. We also systematically reviewed executive session minutes occurring over many years for possible public release. Administrative Agency Proceedings Since last year’s report, there have been a number of administrative agency issues pending in state agencies, including issues before the Attorney General’s Office, Alcohol Beverage Control Commission, State Ethics Commission, Department of Revenue, Secretary of State’s Public Records Office, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Department of Environmental Protection. Major Projects Substantial efforts have been undertaken with respect to sewer matters, private wells, road erosion issues, the “One Big Beach” easement program, various bike path projects, beach access projects, assisted living facilities, the Nantucket human services site, Sherburne Commons, a new cable television license with Comcast, permitting and contracting issues related to the Town’s new public safety facility, and bulk fuel licensing issues. We worked on land title issues, permitting and compliance issues with respect to the Surfside and Siasconset Wastewater Treatment Plants, including the additional stormwater systems and improvements as required by applicable permits for these major public projects. Roads During the year, numerous questions arose regarding the status of roads as private or public ways, erosion of roads, the use of land under roads for wells, septic, or other underground uses, and the laying out of road boundaries and the means of acquiring or preserving public rights thereto, and issues relating to paving of roads. In addition, we appeared on behalf of the public in a number of land registration actions in Land Court to insure protection for the public ownership of various roads. We are assisting in relocating Sheep’s Pond Road because of erosion of existing right of way. Litigation The number of claims and lawsuits involving the Town or County pending as of June 30, 2010 total 67, as follows:  11 lawsuits involving the Town’s title to various parcels of real estate taken for nonpayment of taxes: Nantucket v. Cornelius Callahan, Land Court, No. 71333 Nantucket v. James D. Canan, Land Court, No. 71334 Nantucket v. Loring T. Cushman, Land Court, No. 71353 Nantucket v. Charles Arthur Derby, Land Court, No. 72545 Nantucket v. Alfred B. Mills, Land Court, No. 71563 Nantucket v. George Alfred Mills, Land Court, No. 71561 Nantucket v. Thomas A. Nelson, Land Court, No. 71342 Nantucket v. Norman K. Smith, Land Court, No. 72292 Nantucket v. John G. Wickstrom, Land Court, No. 71696 Nantucket v. William Davidow, Land Court, No. 76578 Page 44 Trustees of Nobadeer Meeting House Condominium Trust v. Watson, et al., Nantucket District Court, C.A. No. 2009-00008  9 lawsuits or adversarial proceedings involving the Board of Selectmen: Herlitz Nominee Trust Waters License Applications, DEP No. W06-1768 Daly v. Nantucket Homes for People, Inc. and Town of Nantucket, Land Court No. 2668011 Grangrade d/b/a “A-Taxi” v. Town of Nantucket, Nan.Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00051 Beachfront Limited Partnership, Eugene L. Ratner and Roslyn G. Ratner v. Diane Holdgate, Individually and the Town of Nantucket, Middlesex Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-00573 Campochiaro v. Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-07 American International Insurance Company as Subrogee of Binth Rustad and Normand Berthlette v. Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-16 Appeal of Revocation of Seasonal Liquor License – Vanessa Noel Hotel and Vanno Bar, ABCC Kay Construction v. Sherburne Commons and Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2007-44 Russell’s Way/Wigwam Way v. Board of Selectmen and Nantucket Hunting Association, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-60  11 lawsuits involving the Planning Board: Gund v. Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 196505 D. C. Realty v. Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 233519 Martin v. Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 244987 Graham, Trustee for Cannonbury Land Realty Trust, et al. v. Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 255072 Marine Lumber Company, Inc. v. Nantucket Planning Board et al., Land Court, No. 297107 Shawkemo Ducklands LLC V. Nantucket Planning Board and See Terrier Farms Trust, Diane Halm, Trustee, Land Court, Misc. No. 355356 The Nantucket Land Council, Inc., et al. v. Nantucket Planning Board and Terrier Farms Trust, Diane Halm, Trustee, Land Court, Misc. No. 355513 Nyren and Brant Point Association v. Nantucket Planning Board and NHM Realty LLC, Point Breeze LLC, et al, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00015 Eric Frost, et al v. Bruce A. Percelay, and Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 08MISC379983 Kiefer, et al. v. Nantucket Planning Board, Land Court, No. 09MISC403789 Rosen, et al. v. Nantucket Planning Board, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-00002  12 lawsuits involving the Board of Appeals: Glidden v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, et al., Land Court, No. 05MISC317146 Notts-McConarty, Trustee of IV Broad Street Trust v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, No. ZAK 250392 Clark v. Nantucket Board of Appeals and William E. Little, Jr., Land Court, Misc. No. 271621 Nine Milk Street Realty Trust v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, 289410 McClure v. Board of Appeals, George Williams and Mary Williams, Land Court, 287709 Frazier v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, Misc. No. 180447 Bates v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, 140554 Klein v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, Misc. No. 333236 Barrett v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Land Court, 09MISC396745 Page 45 Visco v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-00088 Longfin, LLC v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-00086-A Arnold v. Nantucket Board of Appeals, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-00006  1 adversarial administrative hearing involving the Board of Assessors: Verizon New England, Inc. Consolidated Central Valuation Appeals, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Appellate Tax Board (ATB), Docket No. C-273560  3 lawsuits or adversarial proceedings involving the Conservation Commission: Stock, as Trustee of ABC Nominee Trust v. Nantucket Conservation Commission and the Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00031 Lehrman v. Nantucket Conservation Commission, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-00008 Georgaklis v. Nantucket Conservation Commission, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-00024  2 lawsuits involving the Airport Commission: Devine, Trustee of the Loomis Realty Trust v. Nantucket Airport Commission, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00021 Bouchard Painting, Inc. v. Shanska USA Building Co., Inc., et al., Suffolk Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010- 00621  2 lawsuits involving the County of Nantucket: Viera Labbe, Trustee of the Pleasant Street Nominee Trust v. Town and County of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00690 Bretschneider v. Nantucket County and Nantucket County Commissioners, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-00065  1 lawsuit involving the Historic District Commission: Three Martins Lane, LLC v. Nantucket Historic District Commission, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009- 00060  6 Land Court Registration petitions involving Town and County land: In Re: Town of Nantucket (Codfish Park Beach), Land Court, Reg. 38949 J. Arnold Teasdale & Thompson v. Hardy, et. al., Land Court, Reg. 163579 In Re: Ingraham, Land Court, S Petition No. 5004-S-2005 In Re: Esther’s Island/Smith’s Point In Re: Town of Nantucket, Land Court, Reg. 37902 In Re: Wheldon, Land Court, 12559-S  2 lawsuits involving the Police Department: Mosier v. Town of Nantucket, Nantucket Police Department, et al., Barnstable Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-00442 Titus v. Town of Nantucket, et al., Plymouth Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-01414  1 lawsuit involving the Fire Department: Firefighters’ Union v. Town of Nantucket, Joint Labor Management Committee, JLMC-10-01F Page 46  3 lawsuits involving the Nantucket Public Schools: Reis v. Nantucket Public Schools, et al., MCAD Docket No. 08BEM01728 Gonzalez v. Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2009-00076 Miller v. Town of Nantucket, Nan. Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2010-00035  1 lawsuit involving the Building Inspector: Meyer v. Nantucket Building Department, et al., Suffolk Sup. Ct., C.A. No. 2008-05664. (Awaiting Appeals Court Decision)  2 claims that are not yet lawsuits: Lawless v. Nantucket Police Department (Police) Nantucket Memorial Airport Commission v. LaFleur Crane Service (Airport Commission) Each of the above efforts required the participation of numerous Town officials and private citizen volunteers – all working together towards a better Nantucket. Thanks to the Board of Selectmen and all other Town officials and citizens for their cooperation and assistance towards another successful year. Respectfully submitted, Paul R. DeRensis Town Counsel Page 47 HUMAN SERVICES REPORTS COUNCIL FOR HUMAN SERVICES The Council for Human Services (CHS) was established in 1986 to ensure that the Island’s human service needs are addressed in a manner that best serves the residents of Nantucket. The CHS assists many residents with direct services such as food stamps, fuel assistance, insurance enrollment and other emergency needs, and works to facilitate the coordination of existing services in the community to assist clients in need. Additionally, funding sources and services are sought from federal, state and local government as well as private sources. The CHS office also functions as a clearinghouse for information and referral to available health and human services, both locally and on Cape Cod, if appropriate. The office is staffed by Coordinator Maryanne Worth and part-time assistant Ann Medina. The CHS coordinator works directly with the Council for Human Services, a Town committee comprised of nine Nantucket residents appointed by the Board of Selectmen. The coordinator acknowledges and appreciates the volunteer work of the Council for Human Service members: Rachel Rosen and Sue Marques, co-chairs; Jackie Mc Grady, Eve Messing, Linda Williams, and Maria Pena for their service and for their ongoing commitment to the Council’s mission and services. The CHS has monthly scheduled meetings throughout the year and additional meetings as needed. Fiscal Year 2010 Highlights  During FY 2010, 120 households received fuel assistance and $108,040.85 was expended to the Island for this program.  The “Helpline” human services resource directory was revised and updated. This directory is available at the CHS office and in many local helping agencies and is also on the Town’s website under Human Services Department.  A money management workshop on money values, credit reports, credit scores and managing income and expenses was held.  A workshop on saving energy, reducing bills for homes and businesses, and a hands-on weatherization workshop was held.  A workshop on the 211 call program was held. The 211 program is an easy to remember telephone number that connects callers to information about critical health and human services available in their community 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Worked with the Tri County Collaborative for Oral Health Excellence on developing a Nantucket supplement to the 2013 strategic plan to improve access to oral health programs and services on Cape Cod and the Islands, particularly for the low-income uninsured and those insured by MassHealth. Human Services Contract Review Committee The Human Services Contract Review Committee (HSCRC) was established in May of 1993. Members include representatives from the Board of Selectmen, the Finance Committee, the Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission, the Council for Human Services and the community-at-large. The HSCRC reviews local health and human service funding requests annually and make recommendations to the Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen regarding appropriations. This has resulted in Page 48 increased accountability within the funded organizations, increased coordination among agencies, elimination of duplication of services, and a greater understanding and support in the community for health and human services. Organizations receiving funds included: Alliance for Substance Abuse Prevention; Family and Children’s Services d/b/a Nantucket Behavioral Health Services; A Safe Place; Elder Services of Cape Cod and Islands; Interfaith Council Food Pantry; Interfaith Council Rental Assistance Program; South Coastal Counties Legal Services; Nantucket Aids Network; Nantucket Cottage Hospital; Martha’s Vineyard Community Services; and Family Planning. Conclusion As a community, we plan for growth in terms of land use, roads, natural resources, and infrastructure. It is important not to forget the essence of our community - the people. The availability of, and access to, human services is important to all people, regardless of income, family structure, age, or cultural background. The goal of this department and the CHS is to facilitate, sustain and improve the health, education, and well being of all persons on Nantucket by providing those public and private human services which improve the quality of life for all age groups. Across the important issues and work of the Council for Human Services, it is our mission and role to help the health and human service community best meet the needs of all Nantucket residents. In light of reduced state and federal funding and the multiple stressors produced by the Island’s unique challenges, this work toward better services for more people at less cost was more important than ever in FY 2010. I extend my gratitude and appreciation to Ann Medina and the dedication of our board members, family, friends, volunteers, elected officials and fellow Town departments. We are fortunate to reside in a community that values human services by providing support services and programs. Respectfully submitted, Maryanne Worth Coordinator COUNCIL ON AGING The Nantucket Council on Aging (NCOA) was established by voters at the 1974 Annual Town Meeting. The senior center is located at 81 Washington Street in the building known as Saltmarsh Senior Center. Our mission is to identify unmet needs, and design, promote, and improve the services available for our elders through a variety of community programs that support and enrich their lives. Our programs, activities and related information are detailed in a monthly newsletter and posted to the Town website. It was our pleasure to provide more than 24,724 units of services to 1,672 individuals in 2010. Between six and twelve programs are offered daily with an average of 100 people visiting the center each day. This is a 25% increase over last year which we attribute to an increase in boomers becoming seniors, economic need for services and support and people having more time for recreational activities. The 2009-2010 board members were: Thomas B. McGlinn, chairman; Susan Bennett-Witte, Brenda Johnson, Kathy Richen, Jon St Laurent, Glenora Kelly Smith, Patricia Thornton, John McLaughlin and Page 49 Daryl Westbrook. The COA Board Members hold regular monthly business meetings on the first Wednesday of each month at 1:30 PM in the conference room at the 2 Fairgrounds Road building. The Council on Aging staff salaries and an operational budget for the department is provided by the Town. Additional funding assistance was met through fundraising events by the Nantucket Center for Elder Affairs, Inc. and through state and federal grants, foundation grants, and community and participant donations. Without these additional funds our facility needs and the many programs offered would not be possible. This year’s fundraising activities included: John Buttrick’s music benefit held at the First Congregational Church on September 11; the annual Ship’s Inn benefit dinner on October 11; our annual Christmas bazaar, raffle, silent auctions; and Yankee Magazine subscription and renewal offers. Each year the NCOA selects one female and one male as “Nantucket’s Senior Citizens of the Year.” The 2010 awards went to Mrs. Louise Benoit and Mr. Manual “Manny” Dias. These remarkable individuals were presented plaques and certificates of recognition from state and local officials at the annual volunteer appreciation luncheon, attended by the Town Selectmen, Town Administration, the COA board and members of their families. The Nantucket Center for Elder Affairs, Inc. generously paid for the luncheon held at Faregrounds Restaurant, which honored not only Louise Benoit and Manny Dias but also the collective volunteers of the Nantucket Council on Aging, the Nantucket Center for Elder Affairs and those that assist us and the organizations we host at the Saltmarsh Center. The Nantucket Center for Elder Affairs, Inc. raised funds for facility maintenance, transportation grants, and activity programs for our seniors. The NCEA board members continue to work on board development and public support toward awareness of the need to expand the senior center facility. Although funding for this is not readily available, the Council on Aging Director submitted capital requests to the Town and the project was included in the Town’s submission for Stimulus Package funding. Due to the Town’s limited funding and economic conditions they were unable to provide any funding at this time. The Saltmarsh Center sponsored a team for the annual Friends of Nantucket Public Schools Spelling Bee with our winning team of Kenny Blackshaw, Susan Bennett-Witte and Joan Hollander. The COA and NCEA co-sponsored the Island’s annual One Book One Island community project to foster the love for reading as well as a Nantucket Historical Association team for the history quiz bowl comprised of Kenny Blackshaw, Eileen McGrath and Nina Hellman. We sincerely appreciate the generosity from those who made donations and volunteered their time. While there were few storms this past winter, we paired volunteers with seniors in need for snow removal upon request. We held our second annual Elder Expo on November 7th which was targeted on informational sharing and awareness of support services for boomers and seniors. Other items of note that occurred this past year include:  Free information services or seminars were provided concerning health insurance, long-term care, investments, taxes, assistive technology for consumers, home and driving safety, banking and money management, healthy living, caregivers support, nutritional well-being and end of life decisions.  A variety of regularly scheduled programs emphasizing health, well-being, movement and mental stimulation included: aerobic and strength training instruction; yoga classes; Tai Chi and armchair exercise instruction; instruction for electronic mail and searching the Internet; and basic and casual computer instruction and one-on-one computer assistance. The Nantucket Atheneum Clams library service was used to acquire newly released DVD movies for our weekly cinema. A writing group was offered, as well as beginner and intermediate bridge instruction, social bridge and duplicate bridge, cribbage, quilting, and knitting instruction. Page 50 The Senior Center is the host site for Elder Services of Cape Cod and the Islands’ congregate lunch program, weekly blood pressure clinics; Veteran Services agent Arnold Paterson; visits from the Social Security Administration; hearing and hearing aid services; the state’s Women and Infant Children’s nutrition program; and legal services of Cape Cod & the Islands. Goals for fiscal year 2011 include the following:  Continue with and improve programs, services and supports we offer to better meet the needs of our seniors to retain their independence for as long as possible.  Continue networking with elder service providers and first responders through monthly Elder Safety Committee and Town Senior Service meetings to identify needs, improve support and understand what each agency does and needs to support our Island’s senior community.  Host the third Elder Expo in November 2010.  Maintain and improve our website and database of services provided to our seniors.  To improve federal and state funding through an accurate count of our population by promoting awareness about the importance of and provide support for community residents to be counted in the Federal Census for 2010.  Continue with the recommendations provided by the 2007 feasibility study with board development and public relations to increase private support to sustain, expand and improve the senior center. I extend my gratitude and appreciation to the COA staff - Ginny Carrera and Gail Holdgate and the dedication of our board members, family, friends, volunteers, elected officials and fellow Town departments. We are fortunate to reside in a community that values our elderly by providing support services and programs. Thank you for the opportunity to work with you and serve our senior community. Respectfully submitted Linda Roberts, Director OUR ISLAND HOME Our Island Home is a 45-bed nursing home facility operating as a department of the Town of Nantucket. It provides 24 hour nursing care in accordance with state and federal regulations with a staff consists of approximately 80 employees. Our Island Home is the provider of care for those who need long term nursing care. Our Island Home provides inpatient services, adult day care, geriatric related education, and outreach programming. Our goal is to continue to provide the highest quality of care for our residents, through the provision of services necessary for their safety and well being. Our objective is to provide this service within the structure of the regulatory definitions per the governing agencies and within the fiscal constraints set forth by the Town. As a Department of the Town of Nantucket, we strive to support and meet the goals of the Board of Page 51 Selectmen and would like to share with you some ways we have done this. Improve Administrative Management Planning for continued employee professional development continues to be a focus at Our Island Home. As we have established as a facility and as a Town, it is prudent, wise and sometimes necessary to create “succession plans” for some key positions. Over the past year, the Assistant Administrator, Rachel Day has increased her knowledge of the management and responsibilities related to administrating a skilled nursing facility. Improve Fiscal Management Fiscal balancing is a challenge in this environment. In an effort to control purchasing costs, our department heads are always researching new and innovative purchasing options. OUR ISLAND HOME is a member of several industry group purchasing organizations. Our Island Home will transition from a General Fund department of the Town to an Enterprise Fund Department on July 1, 2010. Our Island Home ended FY 2010 within budget. Our Island Home, whenever possible, staffs according to census to help reduce payroll expense. Enhance Quality Of Life for Residents and Visitors This is our major area of focus. To this end, we strive to provide enhanced education and training for all staff to meet the needs of the ever changing levels of care of the folks in our building. Due to budgetary limitations, we have been unable to provide advanced education and training to staff in the enhanced areas of certified nursing assistants or LPN. We hope to reinstate at least some of this training in FY 2012. Our Medicare census and acuity continues to increase, thus providing services to the Nantucket community which otherwise would have to be obtained off-island. Through generous donations, we are able to offer activity programming that may be unavailable without these funds. Our gift funds allow our residents to enjoy activities like art therapy, music therapy, and related programming which they would not experience without these funds. The Nantucket Community is very generous and thinks of our residents often. Our volunteer program is very active with volunteers from toddlers to folks in their 90’s! Some come weekly, some only seasonally, but again, the quality of life for our residents is enhanced greatly. We have noted a distinct difference in expectations from many new admissions. Residents are requiring wireless internet, request lap top availability, and use many other forms of electronic communication, often carrying their own cell phone throughout the facility and reading their Kindle. Challenges The nursing home industry is undergoing operational changes not seen since July 1999 through the conversion of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) process and related operational and fiscal changes. As a stand alone facility, Our Island Home administration must research all options to bring training to Nantucket so that we will be on target along with the rest of the country. A new nationwide database has been created with many new definitions, data collection processes, and resident interviews. This will all commence on October 1, 2010. With the increased Medicare census, our entire staff is challenged to meet the needs of the residents and provide the care necessary even with reduced staffing. For FY 2012, administration will try to build staffing to meet these challenges. In this process, creative juggling of resources will have to take place! Servant Healthcare/Riverwood, which own/manage Sherburne Commons, continues to consider the options for Our Island Home as related to their own facilities. This somewhat limbo state creates its own challenges to Our Island Home administration regarding long term planning. There may be word from Servant/Riverwood in the fall of 2010. Page 52 Accomplishments  In October 2009, Our Island Home had a zero deficiency in the Department of Public Health Survey  Our Island Home was awarded a 5 Star Rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services  Administrator Pam Meriam was chosen as the Outstanding Member May 2010 by the American College of Health Care Administrators Adult Community Day Center (ACDC) ACDC has found a new temporary home through the generosity of St. Mary’s Church. There is a vibrant program held in Father Griffin Hall on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. Volunteers are always welcome! Respectfully submitted, Pamela Meriam Administrator Page 53 INSPECTIONAL SERVICES REPORTS BUILDING DEPARTMENT The Building Department includes Building, Zoning Enforcement (see separate report), Plumbing, Gas, and Wiring. Applications were reviewed, permits issued, and inspections conducted on commercial and residential construction. The annual lodging house, restaurant, and public building inspections are being coordinated with the Fire Department. INSPECTION TOTALS Footings 140 Foundation 17 Chimney 33 Rough 342 Insulation 158 Final 592 Miscellaneous 90 Certificate of Inspection 257 TOTAL INSPECTIONS 1629 Plumbing and Gas 1366 Wiring 1119 TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED Building Permits 1156 New Dwellings 53 Duplex 1 Certificate of Occupancy 581 Gas 535 Plumbing 543 Wiring 822 Violation letters were issued and late filing fees collected for working without the necessary permits. In the up-coming year, the Building Department will continue to work with the Massachusetts Architectural Access Board to promote compliance with the Building code. Respectfully submitted, Bernard Bartlett Building Commissioner Page 54 HEALTH DEPARTMENT The Nantucket Health Department and our community as a whole have unquestionably been adversely affected by the continued economic down turn. However, paradoxically, the department has found itself with a welcomed increase in work load and responsibilities. Traditionally, this department has fluctuated between environmental health issues and true public health concerns dependant on both local and global health concerns. The department’s public health initiatives have been focused on the outbreak of the H1N1 flu virus and the nation’s attempts to inoculate all those eligible for the vaccine. Following an initial shortage of vaccine, supplies were plentiful enough that no individuals were turned away from either a doctors office or the two clinics sponsored by the Nantucket Cottage Hospital and the Health Department. Conducted through physicians’ offices and the locally designated Nantucket Emergency Dispensing Site at the Nantucket Elementary School, Nantucket was able to offer vaccine to over 1,300 individuals. It is anticipated that the winter of 2010 – 2011 will offer an increased availability of vaccine to even more individuals. The Health Department has continued its contractual agreements with Nantucket Cottage Hospital for public health nursing and surveillance services. These contracted services provide, in part, H1N1 clinics and other disease surveillance activities that would not move forward in a timely manner without the staffing provided for by the contract. The contractual participation of this agency has also allowed appropriate reporting of disease statistics and varied treatments to occur throughout the past twelve months. Other health related issues such as the increasing rate of Tuberculosis exposure amongst members of our emigrating community have received assistance from the hospital’s contracted public health nursing service. The locally appointed Tick-Borne Disease Committee has been meeting monthly and, following a number of public hearings, will offer recommendations to the Board of Selectmen concerning various approaches to deer tick remediation with the resultant reduction of tick-borne diseases on Nantucket. With respect to environmental health concerns, the department concluded inspections on all zones associated with the Nantucket Harbor Watershed Protection District and initiated a review process of the 54 technically failed systems. Inspections continued within the Madaket Harbor Watershed Protection District Zone A which expires in mid-December of 2010. Following the regulatory process dictated within Massachusetts General Laws, the department promulgated regulations within the Madaket Harbor Watershed Protection District which maintained existing controls over bedroom capacities as per Title Five following the announcement that municipal water service would be brought to Madaket. In the summer of 2009, University of Massachusetts Field Station personnel denoted a blue green algae bloom within Hummock Pond and the communicating North Head of Hummock Pond. Further testing found a particular algae to contain toxicity levels above a threshold for swimming and ingestion. Both ponds were posted to advise the public of the potential for periodic blooms of toxic algae within each water body. The Department of Environmental Protection has offered assistance in determining weekly toxicity levels for both water bodies during the 2010 summer season. Initial testing in June of 2010 has revealed defined blue green algae within both ponds but at a toxicity level well below state mandated levels for closure. Beach water quality for the summer of 2009 has exhibited diminished closures of ocean and inner harbor beaches due primarily to improvements in the storm drain infrastructure initiated by the DPW. Predictably, closures continue to occur at Miacomet Pond as water temperatures rise and use of the pond by our younger residence increase as the summer progresses. This department, as well as other coastal communities, will look to the state and federal government for more time sensitive testing and notification criteria in the ensuing years. Page 55 Most food service and lodging house inspectional issues continue within the purview of the department’s Registered Sanitarian/Assistant Health Officer Artell Crowley and the department’s seasonal inspector Henry Ross. Artell is responsible for plan reviews and approvals of all new food service establishments and all annual inspections. Both Artell and Henry perform a minimum of four follow-up inspections of the 127 food service establishments, retail food stores, catering establishments, and temporary food booths. Housing complaints have eased during the past twelve months, perhaps attributable to the decrease in work force personnel. However, illegal basement apartment are maintaining a use within the community. When discovered, enforcement actions are initiated. DEPARTMENT FISCAL PRODICTIVITY Food Service Establishments 122 $17,400 Caterers 14 $2,100 Retail Food Stores 15 $4,350 Temporary Food Events 40 $760 Residential Kitchens 36 $3,600 Mobile Food 4 $600 Farmers Markets 4 $225 Tobacco Licenses 30 $1,500 Innholder Permits 14 $1,400 Lodging Houses 124 $12,200 Dormitories 40 $4,000 Body Art 1 $200 Recreational Camps 8 $800 Swimming Pool/Hot Tubs 21 $3,000 Septic Haulers 4 $100 Septic System Permits 85 $40,000 Septic System Installers 20 $1,000 Well Permits 30 $3,000 TOTAL 612 $96,235 Emergency preparedness continues to be a priority for this department. Like most Commonwealth communities, Nantucket also needs to prepare for emergency situations as diverse as weather events, terrorists actions, and the emergency dispensing of medications. As part of the Emergency Preparedness Network for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Nantucket, in conjunction with fire, police, and other Town agencies, has formalized plans for hurricanes and other emergent events including the potential vaccination and treatment of all individuals within the community should these events transpire. Our office manager, Kathy LaFavre, continues to be the departments’ first contact for most individuals accessing our services. Kathy’s ability to professionally manage numerous job requirements while frequently assuming new responsibilities attests to her ability to coordinate inspectional and licensing activities in an active environment. Artell Crowley’s professionalism and communication skills as the department’s primary inspections officer have again provided dividends to the community. His ability to concisely explain public and environmental health concepts continue to be a strong point within the department. Page 56 Emerging issues and increasing responsibilities over the past twelve months have unquestionably affected budgetary issues and manpower apportionments. However, most are issues of merit and must be addressed in a timely manner in order to control increases in costs associated with delays in actions. As in the past, this department remains committed to public health education. Only with proper knowledge can all individuals address and uphold public and environmental health concepts within a community. As the Director of this department, I trust that we have been responsive to the needs of the community and will continue to maintain that trust in the future. Respectfully submitted, Richard L. Ray Certified Health Officer, Director Page 57 ISLAND SERVICES REPORTS NANTUCKET MEMORIAL AIRPORT The Nantucket Memorial Airport continued its planned development projects to create a friendly and attractive asset to the Island infrastructure. The completed terminal addition and landscaping were complimented by the removal of the 1980 “Annex Building” that over the years has served PBA, Continental, Boston and Maine, and Pan Am, as well as Island Airlines and Nantucket Airlines. It had served us well for a building that was built to be temporary in 1980. The area where it was located will be developed into a green area for people to be able to view the airfield. The terminal project also received an award for the best construction project under $30,000,000 from the Construction Management Association of America for 2010. Our primary project for this past year was the initiation of the new combined Operations and Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) Building. This is being built through a discretionary grant from the FAA and Massachusetts Department of Transportation-Aeronautics Division that provided 97.5% of the $6,500,000 cost. The contractor for the building is J. K. Scanlan, from Falmouth, MA. It will provide up to date technology and equipment for the operations and firefighting personnel and replace the current 1980 wood frame building that has been added to and patched over the last 30 years. The building consists of two floors of operations space including a watch room, training room, fitness room, and break area, and three modern bays to house the fire fighting apparatus. Features include rapid refill water and foam capability, communications, security, and efficient heating and cooling with exhaust control. The Airport installed an automated parking and revenue control system that eliminates the costly system that had been in place in the past. The system eliminates the small plastic envelopes that were placed on the windshields and forever littering the neighborhood, and the billing of over 3,000 statements per month. The parking system selected uses a token that has a computer chip in it vs. the magnetic strip and printed ticket method. This system eliminates printers and paper making it environmentally friendly. We are updating the Airport Master Plan to reflect the construction that has taken place as well as the planned future development. Included in future plans will be the start of the Runway 15/33 extension and the parallel taxiway and the expansion of the southwest general aviation ramp. We are experiencing a growth in the sizes of the airplanes utilizing the ramp. This will require a modification in the manner that we park and marshal the aircraft. A project will be started to electrify the ramps under a new program from FAA known as the VALE Program. This Voluntary Airport Low Emission program funds airports’ efforts to lower their emissions from all sources. Nantucket currently uses electric carts and tugs as much as possible and we will convert two buses to low emission standards. An important component to that will be wiring the ramp to eliminate the constant running of the airplane APU’s (Aircraft Power Units) and the GPU’s (Ground Power Units) that run on jet fuel or diesel. By placing hand holes in the ramp the planes can plug into them and run their navigation systems and air conditioning units. It will contribute significantly to minimizing aircraft noise. At the end of March through June, we were given an opportunity to complete three projects under the ASMP (Airport Safety and Maintenance Program). This program funds projects deemed appropriate from Page 58 the Department of Transportation on an 80/20 ratio. We used the money from this to purchase a new grader to replace a machine from 1980, paint the jet fuel tanks inside and out, and replace the fire suppression system on the fuel farm including the superstructure. We also took advantage of the Town’s contract for asphalt and resurfaced our runway 12/30. This 2,600 foot runway had not been resurfaced since 1975. Using this contract we were able to do a complete mill and overlay that saved over $1,000,000, rather than follow FAA requirements that would have included substantial grading and filling to abutting areas. We completed a wildlife management assessment that required monitoring of the entire Airport property over a one year period. This assessment will now provide the data for a comprehensive Wildlife Management Plan that will be used a guide on how we control the aviation environment to make it safe from animal and bird activity. This year’s ACE Camp had its best participation. It was our fourth camp and we had 22 students participate. The Aviation Career Education Camp is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of aviation. This year’s campers enjoyed programs that included art, rocket, and remote helicopter flying, simulator flying, a visit to Hyannis on Cape Air to visit their maintenance terminal, a visit to the air traffic control tower, and orientation flights with Daniel Webster instructor pilots and private Nantucket pilots. They also got a ride on a Rhode Island Air National Guard C-130 Hercules. Our business at the Airport was quite slow through the first quarter of 2010, but saw a significant increase in the second quarter. Good weather contributed to the increase in general aviation aircraft activity and we saw all of last year’s airlines return with some increasing their service. Airlines Cape Air, Air Wisconsin, Colgen (US Airways), Continental, Delta and JetBlue offered service to New York, Newark, Providence, Boston, and Washington National through the secure departure gates. The commuter airlines Nantucket Air, Island Air, and Nantucket Shuttle served Hyannis, New Bedford, and recently Plymouth on flights that do not require screening. 2008 2009 Enplanements 257,755 203,786 Operations 144,073 127,482 Respectfully submitted, Al Peterson Manager Page 59 MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT Waterways Operations The summer boating season started with absolutely terrible weather. This, coupled with a weak economy, seems to have created a very slow start for recreational and transient boaters coming to Nantucket. During the peak season, July and August, there was an average of 2,900 boats moored in Nantucket waters. Response calls for search and rescue, oil pollution containment and clean-up, assisting disabled vessels, and mooring placement issues grow every year. These diverse issues require advanced preparation and training by the department’s personnel. Homeland Security continues to be an additional mission responsibility for the department. If required, the department escorts the passenger carrying vessels and fuel barges when the Maritime Threat Level is increased by the Department of Homeland Security. The Harbormaster responding to a boat fire Assistant Harbormasters Sheila Lucey and Ken Lappin prepared and placed 105 Aids to Navigation, marking all the channels in Nantucket Harbor, Children’s Beach Auxiliary Channel, Polpis Harbor, and Madaket Harbor. Additionally, the entrance into Tuckernuck and all major rock hazards were marked. All of the positions of the local aids to navigation are properly registered with the U.S. Coast Guard and are updated annually in the USCG Light List. The department responded to over 600 calls for assistance, logging over 740 hours underway on the department’s three patrol boats. During March the department was involved with an extremely difficult case when a local boater fell overboard north of Nantucket on a nighttime trip from Hyannis. The vessel was located near Steps Beach with no one on board. It was later determined that the missing man’s family had been removed from the boat by a family friend. The ensuing investigation revealed that the boat had travelled a significant distance with no one at the helm and unfortunately it is believed the operator had fallen over board. The Nantucket and Madaket Harbors Plan was approved by the Secretary of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) on December 29, 2009. The Harbor Plan Implementation Committee is chaired by Dr. Sarah Oktay of the UMass Field Station. The implementation of the action items is well underway and the plan has proved itself as an important guide for Nantucket’s waterways. Page 60 Responses to Public 2010 Incidents 618 Boat Fires 2 Medical Assist 14 Vessels Assisted 370 Towed 38 Sinking-pumped 22 Mooring Issued 178 Derelict Boats Removed 10 Moorings Inspected 410 Citations Written 143 Searches Conducted 15 Oil Spill Responses 18 Turtle disentanglements 3 Shellfish/Water Quality The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Division of Marine Fisheries awarded Nantucket its 13th consecutive pump-out grant for $20,000. The “Headhunter”, which has a capacity in excess of 550 gallons, is a valuable asset to the department. The department removed 24,376 gallons of effluent from vessels on moorings. This truly is an important water quality initiative. This is a joint effort with the Nantucket Boat Basin, which together removed over 100,000 gallons of sewage from Nantucket vessels moored in Nantucket waters. Shellfish Biologist Tara Riley joined our staff on December 7, 2009. Tara’s background includes being the Director of Aquaculture Operations for a well established shellfish operation in Cheriton, VA and she has begun reconstruction of the hatchery located at Brant Point. This year the hatchery will begin producing vital shellfish seed for our recreational and commercial fisheries. The department is anticipating producing large quantities of scallop, quahog, and oyster seed to enhance our natural set. This operation will result in a substantial cost savings by not having to buy seed from off-island growers. The ability to again be able to produce our own shellfish from Nantucket brood stock is a great accomplishment. Tara will also be performing very important water quality sampling during the 2010 summer in coordination with the SMAST program at UMass Dartmouth. The sampling will take place in Nantucket and Madaket Harbors, Miacomet, Sesachacha, Hummock and Long Ponds. This opportunity was afforded the department by generous donations from the Nantucket Community Association, ReMain Nantucket, the Nantucket Land Council, Nantucket Yacht Club, Great Harbor Yacht Club, Nantucket Fishermen’s Association, and many others. Shellfish propagation and water quality initiative information is available on the department’s web site www.nantucket-ma.gov/marine. Recreational scalloping began on October first with approximately 120 people fishing on opening day in Madaket and Town. On November first commercial scallop season began with an average of 60 fishermen working Nantucket waters. The opening day price was $10.00 per pound, with a season average of $9.50 per pound during the five month season. The total landing for the 2009-10 season was 13,800; although the total bushel count was average, the yield per pound was lower at 5.5 pounds per bushel. The average Nantucket yield is in excess of eight pounds per bushel. It is believed that contributing factors to this situation was an extremely rainy June and the introduction of rust tide into Nantucket waters. This harmful algal bloom does not kill the seed shellfish but it does hinder their ability to feed. Page 61 Permits Issued and Revenue Collected Type Issued Number Revenue Collected Moorings 1996 $191,500 Town Pier Slips 95 $182,400 Transient Dockage - $3,250 Recreational Shellfish Resident 1447 $36,165 Non-Resident 5 $500 Commercial Scallop 153 $38,250 Commercial Conch/Quahog 10 $1,500 Commercial Free 31 - Business License/Contract 1 $62,500 Total Revenue Collected $497,400 Beach Management The beach management program enjoyed a relatively productive year with four piping plover nests, fledging a total of three chicks while maintaining as much beach access open to the public as possible. The department coordinated with all of the local, state, and federal agencies for fireworks displays held at or off Jetties Beach. This enormous effort provides the required level of protection of nesting birds and their chicks. The annual beach management reports can be viewed on the department’s web site. Smith Point was open to driving for the first time in several years allowing fishermen an additional area of access. During June the department trained and staffed the beaches with 32 lifeguards and continues to develop as the number of guarded locations becomes more significant. Under the supervision of Jeff Carlson, Beach Manager, the lifeguard program was extremely successful. All of the guards again this year were certified as First Responders in accordance with Massachusetts General Law. The guards performed 38 ocean rescues in high-surf conditions (no patrons lost), treated 89 requests for first aid, and assisted in the recovery of five missing persons. Beach Permits Fiscal Year 2010 Permit Type Number Sold Amount Resident (7/1/09-12/31/09) 433 $43,300 Resident (1/1/10-5/31/10) 1,355 $67,750 Non-Resident (7/1/09-9/30/09) 832 $124,800 Non-Resident (10/1/09-5/31/10) 236 $23,600 Resident/Non-Resident (6/1/10-6/30/10) 435 $43,500 Rental (7/1/09-6/30/2010) 235 $47,000 Total 3,526 $349,950 I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Town Manager and her staff and the Board of Selectmen for their continued support. Also, the Harbor Shellfish Advisory Board in assisting the department with the many complicated issues that affect Nantucket’s waters. The department’s response and programs could not be accomplished without the extremely dedicated full-time members of the department: Assistant Harbormasters Sheila Lucey and Ken Lappin; Beach Manager Jeff Carlson; Shellfish Biologist Tara Riley; Shellfish Wardens Dwayne Dougan and Chris VanDerWolk, and Office Administrator Liz McIsaac. They have all have done an excellent job during the past year. The seasonal employees did an outstanding job during the busy summer season. I appreciate the continued support of all other Town departments and Page 62 agencies. My personal thanks to all the boaters and fishermen of Nantucket and I hope the department has been responsive to your needs. Respectfully submitted, D. F. Fronzuto Marine Superintendent/CHM PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT The Nantucket Parks and Recreation Department continues to provide venues for our residents to enjoy with a limited year round staff including Director Jimmy Manchester; Office Administrator Alice McWade; Property Manager Charles Bartlett; and Youth and Recreational Coordinator A.T. Wilce. We also work with the Parks and Recreation Commissioners, who are your trustees and continue to protect our properties from overuse, with a concerted effort to provide access for the public to use. Commissioners for fiscal year 2010 were: Jamie Ranney, Chair; Nash Strudwick, Vice-Chair; Charles “Jack” Gardner; Maria Zodda, and T.J. Grant. Annual events included the Fourth of July on Main Street and Nantucket Island Fair in early fall at Tom Nevers. We thank the many volunteers who assist us with these events and make them so successful. The Adult Community Day Center (ACDC) relocated from the Teen Center and allowed the Teen Center the ability to operate everyday after school. The Teen Center, with the help of “The Pepsi Challenge” and 56 local volunteers, underwent a face lift on its north side of the building and grounds and helped saved the Town at least $8,000. The Finance Committee’s approval for a new boiler and venting of the ceiling allowed the Teen Center to brighten up the interior with new lights and a bright ceiling finish. The Skate Park celebrated its grand opening of phase two of the in-ground bowl by having a t-shirt contest for the best design and competition for the skaters. A good time was had by all. Our concessionaires are a vital part of our organization and include operations at Jetties Beach, Children’s Beach, Surfside Beach, and the Francis Street Beach Kayaks. We want to thank the following organizations for their support: the Community Preservation Committee for allowing us the opportunity to provide new parks, playgrounds, and future ball fields; the Nantucket Arts Council for providing grants for entertainment; the Nantucket Garden Club for grants for trees which line Bathing Beach Road; the Ozone Classic, in memory of David Ozias, whose funding helped to supplement the Skate Park, including the new bleacher installed this year; and Nantucket Island Resorts for a $10,000 donation for a Children’s Beach Ramp. Respectfully submitted, James P. Manchester Director Page 63 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Nantucket Department of Public Works (DPW) is comprised of six major divisions: wastewater collection; wastewater treatment; solid waste (both recycling and solid waste disposal); urban forestry; stormwater management; and general street and sidewalk maintenance. This annual report will provide an overview of each division and its accomplishments during FY 2010. Wastewater Collection During FY 2010 the Town continued to make progress in achieving the recommendations contained in the Comprehensive Wastewater Management Plant and the goals established in the Wastewater Capital Improvement. Phase 2-A Infiltration/Inflow Reduction and Sewer Rehabilitation Project (Main Street and adjacent areas south of Main Street) was completed. The design, specifications, plans, and bidding documents have been prepared for Phase 2-B (north of Main Street). The DPW continues to provide daily maintenance of the sewer collection. Wastewater Treatment The DPW is responsible for the operation and maintenance of wastewater treatment plants in Surfside and Siasconset. Both facilities are advanced treatment plants, including nitrogen reduction, and are in compliance with federal and state regulations. Solid Waste The solid waste facility took in 24,687 tons for all categories of waste in 2010 and recycled 19,000 tons of material. Landfill mining commenced in 2010. This mining activity will provide future lined landfill space and reclaim valuable buried materials, while at the same time significantly reduce the potential for groundwater contamination. Nantucket has been recognized as a National leader for its recycling efforts. Urban Forestry The Town of Nantucket was honored for its maintenance efforts in urban forestry with its tenth Tree City Award. Stormwater Management During FY 2010 the DPW completed Phase 1 of the Stormwater System Improvements. This project improved stormwater drainage in the Brant Point area while reducing the potential for flooding due to high tide back feeding into the drainage system. Modifications to the stormwater pumping station at Children’s Beach should prevent flooding in the area. Streets Paving Surfside Road between fairgrounds Rd and Vesper Lane Street Painting List 2010 Thermoplastic: Fairgrounds Road, Vesper Lane, Quaker Road, Orange Street, Francis Street, Commercial Street, Macy Lane, Surfside Road, Tom Nevers Road, and all crosswalks on Old South Road. Water based paint: Polpis Road, Wauwinet Road, Madaket Road, Hummock Pond Road, Cliff Road, and Bartlett Road. Page 64 Respectfully submitted, Jeffrey Willett Director WOODS HOLE, MARTHA’S VINEYARD AND NANTUCKET STEAMSHIP AUTHORITY The Massachusetts legislature enabled the Woods Hole, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket Steamship Authority (SSA) in 1960. The quasi-state agency has operated specifically for the benefit of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard without a deficit or state subsidy since 1962. Any operating deficit would, as required by the Enabling Act, be assessed to the five ports that we serve according to proportionate representation. Nantucket has a 35% vote. The five members meet monthly in public, alternating between the ports. Nantucket was the host port in September 2009 and May 2010, with the meetings held in the Whaling Museum’s Discovery Room, courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association. As Nantucket’s “lifeline”, one of the most serious challenges for the SSA is to maintain vital service levels at the most efficient cost. A major cost item has always been fuel oil, which tripled in price in 2008. An ongoing fuel oil hedging program has reduced our risk of sudden fuel cost spikes. Being able to budget at fixed rates allows us to even out costs and to mitigate the need for rate increases. Total operating revenues for the year were about $85 million, while total expenses were about $82 million. At the end of June, passenger and auto traffic was about equal with 2009, and truck traffic had declined about 8%. Improvement in our website allowing easier internet reservation service has been a key focus. A major mid-life renovation and upgrading of our workhorse vessel, the MV Eagle, is scheduled for next year. A good and ongoing working relationship with management over the past few years has been improving customer service and traffic numbers. Your SSA representatives have promoted frequent rider discount books, including a 10-ride fast ferry coupon book for seniors, children under 17, and special consideration for those with medical travel difficulties. These measures increased our market share on the fast ferries. A new slow/fast rate is proving popular: go to the mainland on a slow boat, return within three days on the fast ferry, or vice versa. We also have made improvements in our off-island parking lots, annual permits, and our shuttle bus system. Cooperation with the Hy-Line in trip scheduling and other areas has resulted in greater efficiency and cost-savings for both boat lines. The SSA in 2008 adopted a policy of requiring proof of residence via the Street List maintained by the Town Clerk in order to qualify for the reduced auto excursion rate. It is estimated that more than 500 people have thus joined the Street List, qualifying the Town for additional federal funds over the next ten years. Renovation of our docking slips in Hyannis over the winter was completed in early summer with the assistance of some of the federal stimulus funds. We now have greater flexibility and cost-saving efficiency in utilization of our vessels and our schedules. A 50 cent per passenger fee was imposed by the state legislature on most ticket sales (coupon books are excluded) in 2004 that yielded $97,326 for the Town in 2009. Page 65 Our Nantucket and Hyannis terminal teams and our different boat crews work very hard for Nantucket in providing a safe and pleasant Steamship Authority experience for Islanders and our visitors. Respectfully submitted, H. Flint Ranney, Governing Board, Nantucket Member Nat Lowell, Port Council Member VISITOR SERVICES The Visitor Services and Information Department was established to provide a quality experience for Island visitors and residents. The department’s budget consists of funding allocated from a percentage of the Local Room Occupancy tax paid by all licensed guesthouses and hotels. These licensed guest houses and hotels must collect state (5.7%) and local (4%) which totals 9.7%. The local share of 4% is then returned to the Town and the department’s budget is based on 30% of that amount. Projects and activities undertaken and completed by Visitor Services during the 2010 fiscal year included:  Travel and Lodging Brochure: The Department updated the annual Travel and Lodging brochure with funding assistance from and in partnership with the Chamber of Commerce and Nantucket Lodging Association. This brochure is available free to the public and lists all licensed bed and breakfasts along with general Island information. It is available at the 25 Federal Street office, calling (508) 228-0925, by e-mailing towninfo@nantucket-ma.gov or downloading from our website: www.nantucket- ma.gov/visitor.  Visitor Services continues to upgrade and manage the Comfort Stations located at 25 Federal Street and the seasonal Siasconset Station located at 1 Folger Court. During the spring of 2010, the Siasconset Comfort Station underwent a total renovation to upgrade its appearance.  Fireworks: Visitor Services helps to sponsor and organizes the Fourth of July fireworks exhibition at Jetties Beach. Due to nesting of endangered piping plovers at Jetties Beach, we were unable to use the beach for the fireworks display, instead utilizing a barge located one mile off Jetties Beach. This year Visitor Services embarked on a fundraising campaign of selling fireworks t-shirts to raise money. The popular shirts sold out and a larger quantity will be ordered next year. Visitor Services would also like to thank the Town Manager and the Town of Nantucket for helping with much of the cost of this year’s fireworks and assisting in continuing an Island tradition.  Visitor Information Centers: The Visitor Center at 25 Federal Street continues to be the main office for providing information on activities, services, clubs, organizations, museums, businesses, lodging, and restaurants as well as special events. The office welcomes over 60,000 visitors a year and serves as a daily referral service for available rooms including the helpful seasonal one night list and cancellations for holiday weekends. The office constantly maintains lists of restaurant openings and closings and also keeps menus available to the public. The office is open year round - seven days a week in season and closed Sundays, December through early June. For those traveling by boat, a satellite kiosk on Straight Wharf provides information to visitors and residents seven days a week in season. For the second year, Visitor Services has trained the Ambassadors at the Airport. The Ambassadors help people navigate the new airport terminal, extending their philosophy of assisting the public in their travels. Page 66  Visitor Services and the Chamber of Commerce partnered again for the fourth annual Christmas Lighting Decorating Contest. Many homes participated and were judged in many categories for their display.  Twitter: Visitor Services began using the short messaging service in the spring of 2010 as a way to provide updates on lodging, restaurants, and other important visitor information. Visitor Services will continue using and finding ways to use Twitter to assist both residents and visitors to the island. Join us and sign up at www.twitter.com/nantucketbuzz. Respectfully submitted, Kate Hamilton Pardee Director SIASCONSET WATER DEPARTMENT The following activities are highlights of fiscal year 2010 for the Siasconset Water Department:  Construction began on the new 400,000 gallon water storage tank located on the Water Department property on Milestone Road. The tank is scheduled to go on line October 1, 2010 and completion of the related control work is expected to be completed by March 1, 2011.  The Water Commission awarded a contract to C.C. Construction Inc. to replace the 6” water main on Low Beach Road with an 8” water main.  Improvements to the distribution system continued with the replacement of over 40 valves throughout the system.  Recognizing the historical significance of the existing water department buildings, the Water Commission authorized the development of plans and financing for the renovation of the existing Water Department buildings during fiscal year 2011.  The Commissioners renewed a Memorandum of Agreement with the Nantucket Water Commission whereby the Wannacomet Water Company will continue to provide certified operators as well as administrative and operational support. The Water Commission would like to express its thanks to the residents of Siasconset, other Town departments, the Town Manager and the Wannacomet Water Company for their help and assistance throughout the year. Respectfully submitted, Siasconset Water Commission Gerald Eldridge, Chair Robert Benchley, III, Clerk John Pearl Page 67 WANNACOMET WATER COMPANY Mission Statement The Wannacomet Water Company shall strive to provide high quality drinking water that exceeds all established Federal and Commonwealth drinking water standards, provide the highest level of customer and water related support services achievable, educate and inform the public of the need to protect Nantucket’s water resources, and to accomplish this mission using prudent utility practices and responsible fiscal management. The following highlights are illustrative of the manner and ways that the objectives outlined in the Mission Statement were achieved during Fiscal Year 2010. Water Supply and Quality Total fiscal year production from all of the wells was 532,211 gallons. This represents a six percent reduction from the previous fiscal year and is the lowest amount pumped in a fiscal year since fiscal year 2005. The 85,029,000 gallons pumped in July was the lowest for that month since 2003 and is reflective of the current economic conditions as well as cool and wet weather. Construction of the 2,000,000 gallon storage tank in North Pasture was started and the tank is scheduled to go on line on October 1, 2010. The control and electrical systems are expected to be completed by February 1, 2011. Design and permitting for the extension of the distribution system was completed and construction of Phase I is expected to be completed by December 31, 2010. Operations and Engineering Under the direction of Chris Pykosz, Operations Manager, Wannacomet continues to strengthen its distribution system by installing new water mains to improve fire flows and circulation patterns. Upgrades have been undertaken and completed for water mains, services, gate valves, and fire hydrants. The meter upgrade program was initiated and is expected to be completed in the fall of 2011. When completed all water meters will be read from the offices at 1 Milestone Road. The system will have the ability to track the water use patterns of individual accounts for a defined period of time. Administration Under the direction of Business Manager Heidi Holdgate, Wannacomet begun a program to scan as many records as possible to reduce the handling of paperwork and reduce storage needs. Previously all system maps and field books had been scanned. We urge you to visit our website at www.wannacomet.org. The website has many tips for water efficiency and an online water use calculator to help determine a customer’s water use patterns. We also urge our customers to take advantage of our secure and easy to use E-Bill program. The Nantucket Water Commission and the Siasconset Water Commission renewed their Memorandum of Agreement whereby Wannacomet Water Company provides certified operators, and technical and administrative support to the Siasconset Water Department. Page 68 I would like to take this opportunity to thank the employees of the Wannacomet Water Company for their dedication and commitment to providing our customers with the safest and highest quality drinking water possible and excellent customer service. I also want to thank Nantucket Water Commissioners Nonie Slavitz, Nelson Eldridge and Allen Reinhard for their support and guidance. Respectfully submitted, Robert L. Gardner General Manager Page 69 PLANNING AND ZONING REPORTS NANTUCKET CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Nantucket Conservation Commission is charged under state law with the protection of the Island's natural resources. The Commission serves as the first line of administration and enforcement of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act aimed at protecting coastal and inland wetland resources. The Commission also administers and enforces the Nantucket Wetland Bylaw, which contains stricter performance standards than does the state law, and reaches additional wetlands resources. The Conservation Commission holds title to and manages a number of properties on Nantucket, with a focus toward habitat protection and low-level passive recreational use. The Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (the "Act"), passed in 1972, identifies and protects eight public interests served by wetlands: the protection of public and private water supply; the protection of ground water supply; flood control; storm damage prevention; prevention of pollution; protection of land containing shellfish; protection of fisheries; and protection of wildlife habitat. To accomplish this task, the Act restricts development in wetlands and wetland buffers by requiring that those wishing to perform work that may impact wetlands apply for, and obtain, a permit from the Conservation Commission. The Nantucket Wetland Bylaw, adopted in 1983, regulates activities deemed to have a significant or cumulative effect on wetland values including the eight identified above under the state act, as well as erosion control, recreation, public safety, and wetland scenic views. It does so by requiring a permit to remove, fill, dredge, alter, or build upon or within 100 feet of a number of enumerated protected resource areas. The application process for obtaining a local permit is the same as for the state permit. The Commission evaluates two primary categories of permit applications:  Requests for Determination (in which the applicant seeks a determination whether a site or project falls within state or local jurisdiction, or where the applicant seeks verification of resource delineations);  Notices of Intent (in which the applicant seeks permission to conduct activity within a resource area as outlined in state and local statutes), and, related to the Orders of Conditions that issue as the result of Notice of Intent, a Request for an Amended Order of Conditions, and a Request for a Minor Modification. The Commission conducts public meetings every other Wednesday to consider applications, review documentation, hear testimony from interested parties, act on applications, and conduct other business. In fiscal year 2010, the Commission considered 20 Requests for Determination, 84 Notices of Intent, and 16 Requests to Amend a previously-issued Order of Conditions. Following public hearings, the Commission issued Orders of Conditions in response to the Notices of Intent permitting work to be done (or prohibiting such work) in areas under its jurisdiction (within 100 feet of a resource area), subject to numerous conditions dictated to ensure the protection of those resource areas. Additionally, where appropriate, the law requires that the Commission review and issue Certificates of Compliance. In July, the Commission elected Ernie Steinauer as chairman, and Sarah Oktay as vice chairman. They were joined by Commissioners Andrew Bennett, John Braginton-Smith, Mary Wawro, John Brescher, and Page 70 Jennifer Karberg. Dirk Roggeveen continued as Administrator of the department, and Catherine Dickey as the Office Administrator. My priority working with and for the Commission, and the Commission's priority in conducting its mission, is to secure the protection of Nantucket's coastal and inland wetland resources in a manner consistent with state and local law, with substantive and procedural due process for those coming before the Commission, with the best available scientific and technical resources available to the Commission, in the manner most cost-effective for the Town. Respectfully submitted, Dirk Gardiner Roggeveen Administrator HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION The Historic District Commission (HDC) was established by the Massachusetts legislature in 1955. Its purpose has been to promote the general welfare of the inhabitants of the Town of Nantucket through the preservation and protection of historic buildings, places, and districts of historic interest; the development of an appropriate setting for these buildings, places, and districts; and the benefits resulting to the economy of Nantucket in developing and maintaining its vacation-travel industry through the promotion of these historic associations. The original Act has been amended a number of times in order to address community issues regarding HDC policies and procedures. The complete text is included in the Commission’s guidebook, Building with Nantucket in Mind. In accordance with its statute, the HDC is responsible for reviewing exterior architectural features of all structures proposed to be altered, moved, constructed, or demolished. Guidelines for review are included in Building with Nantucket in Mind and in The Nantucket Sign Book, which are available at the HDC office and local bookstores. Visit our department webpage within the Town’s website at www.nantucket-ma.gov to download schedules and receive up-to-date information. The following is a datasheet reflecting the type and amount of approvals for the most recent year and compares them with the past several years. Between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, the HDC conducted the following reviews: Applications Reviewed FY10 % Changed from FY09 FY09 % Changed from FY05 FY05 % Changed from FY01 FY01 Additions 83 (30%) 118 (48%) 161 (59%) 202 Alterations/Revisions 208 (33%) 312 (57%) 489 (66%) 613 As-built 34 (27%) 54 42% 24 (17%) 41 Basement/Foundation 10 (23%) 13 (29%) 14 N/A N/A Color/Material Change (incl. roofing) 68 (55%) 123 (36%) 107 70% 40 Commercial 2 (71%) 7 (87%) 16 (90%) 21 Demolition 40 (22%) 51 (52%) 83 (40%) 67 Garage/Barn/Boat House/Cabana/Work- 27 (4%) 28 (56%) 62 (52%) 56 Page 71 shop/Gazebo Garage/Apt. or Studio 9 (30%) 13 (66%) 27 (77%) 39 Hardscaping 162 5% 155 (20%) 203 N/A N/A Like-kind 199 26% 158 N/A N/A N/A N/A Misc Items 59 (6%) 63 N/A N/A (56%) 133 Move (on/off/on site) 59 (16%) 70 (38%) 95 N/A N/A New Dwellings 53 (4%) 55 (64%) 146 (77%) 233 Pool/Hot Tub/Spa 56 102% 27 (16%) 67 87% 30 Renewals 4 (56%) 9 (33%) 6 N/A N/A Renovation 21 (12%) 24 (82%) 114 (22%) 27 Sheds 52 27% 41 (55%) 115 (29%) 73 Signs 56 (17%) 66 (82%) 203 (15%) 66 Solar Panels/WECS 11 (42%) 19 N/A N/A N/A N/A Total COA approved 1252 (10%) 1387 (41%) 2120 (30%) 1799 Total COA denied 5 (74%) 19 (91%) 58 (90%) 48 Total No. of COAs 1257 (11%) 1406 (42%) 2178 (32%) 1847 Site Inspections 565 (26%) 763 (25)% 756 (15%) 663 Total Revenue $92,886 (20%) $116,375 (33%) $140,118 (27%) $147,421 NOTE: NUMBERS IN PARENTHESES ARE NEGATIVE AMOUNTS. * As-Built applications include any alterations, which were constructed without the HDC’s review. Meetings The HDC convened weekly on Tuesday evenings from 5:00 to 10:00 PM, and held 47 regular weekly meetings. Commission Members The Commissioners were as follows: Dirk Roggeveen (Chairman), John McLaughlin (Vice Chair), David Barham, Kevin Kuester, Valerie Norton and Linda Williams. Diane Coombs, Dawn Holdgate and John Wagley continued their role as alternates. Valerie Norton resigned her position in May and the Board of Selectmen appointed Kevin Kuester to fill the remainder of her term. Advisory Committees The HDC is assisted by the following advisory committees: Sign Advisory Council (SAC); ‘Sconset Advisory Board (SAB); Tuckernuck Advisory Committee (TAC); Historic Structures Advisory Board (HSAB); and Maddequet Advisory Board (MAB). Staff The HDC office staff was comprised of part-time Administrative Assistant Ann Medina, Office Administrator Terry Norton, Assistant Administrator James Grieder, and Administrator Mark W. Voigt, AICP. Issues The HDC issued its 55,189 Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) by the end of the fiscal year and had one appeal before the Board of Selectmen. The HDC introduced a warrant article proposing increased setbacks for pools in the core historic districts of Town and ‘Sconset. Although a majority at Town Meeting voted in favor, the needed 2/3 majority was not attained. It will be studied by the Planning Board for future consideration. Page 72 The HDC continued its 55th year with applications across the board still showing a downward trend, although it has begun to level off. Most notably, the number of applications reviewed remained consistent within the past couple of years but the dollar volume of projects is still significantly below 2005 levels. Pools, hot tubs, and sheds bucked the downward trend with significant increases as more amenities for existing properties may make them more attractive in a soft real estate market. “Gut rehabs” of historic buildings may have slowed some but are still the most problematic issues for the HDC. The Historic District is on pace to lose two to four historic structures annually. Respectfully submitted, Mark W. Voigt, AICP Administrator Page 73 NANTUCKET PLANNING BOARD In Massachusetts, Planning Boards are authorized under Chapter 41, Section 81-A of the Massachusetts General Laws. In 1953, Chapter 41 was amended to include Sections 81-K through 81-GG, also known as the Subdivision Control Law, the purpose of which is to protect the safety, convenience, and welfare of the inhabitants of the cities and towns by regulating the laying out and construction of ways, which provide access to the lots within a subdivision. Nantucket adopted these laws in 1955. The Nantucket Planning Board administers the Subdivision Control Law through standards contained in a document adopted and amended by the Planning Board entitled the Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land. Pursuant to Section 139-30 of the Code of the Town of Nantucket, the Planning Board is authorized to grant special permits for a variety of projects. In granting special permits, the Planning Board follows the rules and procedures set forth in Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, also known as the Zoning Act. Nantucket's Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land (Section 3.06), in conjunction with Chapter 139-2 of the Nantucket Zoning Bylaw, authorizes the Planning Board to review all plot plans for secondary dwellings to determine if adequate access is available to the lot and structures. Pursuant to the above laws, the Planning Board acts in the following areas: 41-81D Master Plan The Planning Board approved the Master Plan on March 30, 2009 and the Plan was accepted by the Town through the unanimous passage of Article 26 at the 2009 Annual Town Meeting on April 7, 2009. The acceptance of the Master Plan by the Town is an important milestone for the Planning Board. This Plan is the first local plan compliant with state requirements and a necessary update of the 1990 Goals and Objectives for Balanced Growth document, which was to be valid until 2010. Important zoning changes in concert with the Plan have been approved by town meeting and the Board continues to propose zoning changes consistent with the Plan, which prioritizes affordable housing development and land use changes over the next ten years. A schedule of comprehensive zoning changes consistent with the Town and Country Overlay District concept and the existing character of developed neighborhoods is a significant component of the Plan. Review of land for subdivision proposals The Planning Board takes formal action on three types of plans for the division of land: Preliminary, Approval Not Required (ANR), and Approval Required (AR or Definitive). Submission of a preliminary plan gives a prospective applicant an indication of what the Planning Board will require for definitive plan submission, and provides the Board with a preview of development anticipated in the future. Preliminary plan approvals have no status as subdivisions under the law, and lots approved through this process may not be legally recorded or conveyed. Approval-Not-Required (ANR) plans and Approval Required (AR) plans create legal lots suitable for recording and conveyance. However, many of the plans endorsed as ANR plans are merely lot line adjustments, perimeter plans, or conveyances to abutters, therefore, not all new lots are buildable under the Zoning Bylaw. The Planning Board is not authorized to require public improvements or establish conditions of approval when taking action on ANR applications, and has narrow grounds for denying them. Page 74 Plans acted upon by the Planning Board from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 Application Type Submitted Approved Denied Withdrawn New Buildable Lots Created Pre-Plans 1 1 0 0 N/A ANR 50 48 2 0 65 AR 3 3 0 0 10 Total (ANR’s & AR’s) 54 52 2 0 75 The following chart illustrates a multi-year trend in new buildable lots created Lots Created Through AR and ANR 0 100 200 300 4001989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010 YearNumber of Lots Review of proposals to erect secondary dwellings on existing lots Nantucket's Zoning Bylaw and Subdivision Rules and Regulations authorize the Planning Board to grant approval for secondary dwellings when it finds that adequate vehicular access has been provided. The Board approved 20 secondary dwellings from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. The following chart illustrates a multi-year trend in second dwelling approvals Secondary Dwelling Approvals 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 16019901992199419961998200020022004200620082010 Year# of Approvals Page 75 Issuance of Special Permits Special Permits from the Planning Board are required for the following:  Major Commercial Developments (MCD)  Major Residential Developments (MRD)  Cluster Subdivisions  Two or more driveway accesses on a lot  Residential dwellings with ground cover exceeding 800 square feet within the Moorlands Management District (MMD)  Commercial Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS)  Multi-Family Housing within the Multi Family Overlay Districts  Special developments within the Public Wellhead Recharge District  Projects within the Mid-Island Planned Overlay District  Employee housing for a maximum of 18 persons per site within the Neighborhood Employee Housing Overlay District (NEHOD)  Projects within the Harbor Overlay District (HOD) The Board reviewed twenty-four (24) special permit applications during fiscal year 2010 as follows:  One (1) Major Commercial Development  One (1) Major Residential Development (MRD)  Six (6) Driveway Access  One (1) HOD  Two (2) Mid-Island Planned Overlay District (MIPOD)  Thirteen (13) Modifications to Previously Granted Special Permits Recommendations to the Zoning Board of Appeals The Planning Board reviewed and issued recommendations on Zoning Board of Appeals variance and special permit applications, as well as appeals of the Zoning Enforcement Officer's rulings. Articles submitted by citizens, town agencies, and the Nantucket Planning Board concerning proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw, chapter 139 of the Town of Nantucket Code The Planning Board holds public hearings and makes recommendations to Town Meeting on articles to amend the Zoning Bylaw. In fiscal year 2010 the Town of Nantucket held a Special Town Meeting in October of 2009 and the Annual Town Meeting in April of 2010. Thirteen (13) zoning articles were submitted for the Special Town Meeting Warrant. The Planning Board held public hearings on these articles before submitting recommendations. The following zoning amendments were approved at the 2009 Special Town meeting: Article 10: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Age Restriction The purpose of this article was to reduce the minimum age required to reside in the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district from 62 to 55. Article 11: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Operating Entity Page 76 The purpose of this article was to remove the requirement that only the Town of Nantucket or not-for- profit entities created for the purpose of providing housing for Nantucket senior citizens can own or manage the facilities located in the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district. Article 12: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Skilled Nursing The purpose of this article was to add skilled nursing as a permitted use in the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district. Article 13: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Unit Ownership The purpose of this article was to permit the housing units within the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district to be sold as condominiums. Article 14: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Major Site Plan Review The purpose of this article was to modify the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district so that all applications are subject to a special permit rather than just major site plan review. This increased the level of review by the Planning Board and required notifications to the public and abutters when projects are proposed. Article 15: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Assisted Living Community (ALC) District – Affordable Housing The purpose of this article was to add affordable housing as a use allowed by special permit in the Assisted Living Community (ALC) district. Affordable housing located within the ALC district will be exempt from the total number of housing units permitted. It is important to note that affordable housing for the elderly or the disabled is already permitted in the ALC district and is not affected by this article. However, this change will allow affordable housing for all age groups to be located in the ALC district. Article 16: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Definitions and Special Districts The purpose of this article was to reorganize §139-14 of the Zoning Bylaw and incorporate the changes approved in Articles 10-15. The only substantive change to this article not included in the previous articles, is the removal of the requirement that the housing units within the ALC district be limited to a maximum of two (2) occupants. *Article 18: Zoning Map Change: Madaket RC to VTEC The purpose of this article was to rezone a portion of Madaket from Residential Commercial (RC) to Village, Trade, Entrepreneurship and Craft (VTEC). The parcels included in this rezoning include the Madaket Marine parcels. This rezoning was consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts and the Madaket Area Plan. *Article 19: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to LUG-3 The purpose of this article was to rezone a portion of Madaket from Residential 20 (R-20) to Limited Use General 3 (LUG-3). Both of these zoning districts are primarily residential, however, the intensity of the LUG-3 district is substantially less than the R-20 district. Most of the properties included in this rezoning were either dedicated open space parcels or owned by the Town. The few privately owned parcels included are more consistent in intensity with the LUG-3 district than the R-20 district in which they are currently located. This rezoning was consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts and the Madaket Area Plan. *Article 20: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to VR The purpose of this article was to rezone a portion of Madaket from Residential 20 (R-20) to Village Residential (VR). Both of these zoning districts are primarily residential, however, the intensity of the VR is slightly less than the R-20. This rezoning was consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts and the Madaket Area Plan. Page 77 *Article 21: Zoning Map Change: Madaket R-20 to LUG-1 The purpose of this article was to rezone a portion of Madaket from Residential 20 (R-20) to Limited Use General 1 (LUG-1). Both of these zoning districts are primarily residential, however, the intensity of the LUG-1 district is substantially less than the R-20 district. This rezoning was consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts and the Madaket Area Plan. *Article 22: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Height The purpose of this article is to reorganize §139-17 of the Zoning Bylaw, to begin implementation of a height chart, and to establish a Village Height Overlay District. Maximum height restrictions for properties in the VR district as affected by Warrant Article 20 have been reduced from 30 feet to 25 feet. This reduced height requirement was consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts and the Madaket Area Plan. Sixteen (16) zoning articles were submitted for the Annual Town Meeting Warrant. The Planning Board held public hearings on these articles before submitting recommendations. The following zoning amendments were approved at the 2010 Annual Town Meeting: *Article 43: Zoning Map Change: Split Zoning District Corrections-Various Locations This article rezoned parcels throughout the Island that were divided between two (2) or more zoning districts and placed them in a single district that best matched the characteristics of the lot(s). *Article 44: Zoning Map Change: Eel Point Road This article rezoned parcels from LUG-2 to LUG-3, which better matched the existing character of the area and the development of the lot(s). *Article 45: Zoning Map Change: Appleton Road This article rezoned parcels RC-2 to VTEC. This rezoning is consistent with the implementation of the Town and Country Overlay District concepts. *Article 47: Zoning Map Change: West Miacomet Road and Somerset Road This article rezoned parcels from RC-2 to R-10, which better matched the existing character of the area and the development of the lot(s). *Article 48: Zoning Map Change: Miacomet Golf Club This article rezoned parcels from RC-2 to and LUG-2 to CN, from RC-2 to LUG-3, and from the Country Overlay District to the Town Overlay District. The purpose of this article was to place commercially used parcels in a commercial district and to place recreationally used parcels in a larger lot district. This rezoning was consistent with the Town and Country Overlay District concepts. *Article 49: Zoning Map Change: South Pasture This article rezoned parcels from LUG-2 to CI and from the Country Overlay District to the Town Overlay District. The purpose of this article was to increase the industrial area in the vicinity of the Airport to facilitate a real estate transaction approved by a previous Town Meeting. *Article 50: Zoning Map Change: Surfside Area Plan- Surfside West This article rezoned parcels from LUG-2 to LUG-1 and from LUG-2 to R-40, all in accordance with the Surfside Area Plan. This rezoning is consistent with the Town and Country Overlay District concepts. *Article 52: Zoning Map Change: Somerset Road and Somerset Lane This article rezoned parcels from LUG-2 to R-40. This rezoning is consistent with the Town and Country Overlay District concepts. *Article 54: Zoning Map Change: Intensity Regulations-Residential 5 (R-5) This article added an exemption for a side yard setback reduction in the R-5 district only. Article 56: Zoning Bylaw Amendment: Secondary Dwelling Page 78 This article reduced the minimum separation distance between a primary and secondary dwelling from twelve (12) feet to ten (10) feet. * Articles sponsored by the Planning Board Planning Board Budget and Revenues All expenses for the Planning Board were paid through the NP&EDC budget line items for fiscal year 2009. The Planning Board collected total revenues of $14,844.09 from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. These revenues were comprised of application filing fees as well as photocopy fees. Filing fees are deposited directly into the Town Treasury's General Fund. The Planning Board also requires that applicants submit engineering escrow monies to fund professional inspections of roadway, drainage and sewerage improvements associated with Approval Required Subdivisions, Major Commercial Developments, and other special permits as necessary. These funds are kept in a separate escrow account, and unspent balances are returned to applicants upon the completion of construction and inspection. In fiscal year 2009, the Planning Board collected $71,876.17 in engineering escrow monies for new subdivision and special permit filings. The following chart illustrates multi-year trend Planning Board revenue Revenue 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010YearDollars In addition to the revenues generated by the Planning Board deposited in the Town Treasury's General Fund, the Planning Board negotiates public infrastructure improvements in association with Subdivision and Major Commercial Development permit approvals. Infrastructure improvements may include sidewalk or bike path enhancements, the creation of on-street parking, roadway surfacing, extension of public utilities such as water or sewer, etc. In many cases, the developer completes the project and makes a “gift” to the Town and in other cases they make a monetary donation. Since 2005, approximately $3,914,000.00 has been generated for projects that benefit the community. Respectfully submitted, Barry G. Rector Chairman Page 79 NANTUCKET PLANNING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION The Nantucket Planning and Economic Development Commission (NP&EDC) is recognized as one of thirteen regional planning agencies in the Commonwealth. It was created pursuant to a home rule petition under Article 5 of the Special Town Meeting of January 25, 1973. The Massachusetts legislature approved the petition as Chapter 561 of the Acts of 1973. The NP&EDC is unique among regional planning agencies in that it represents one town and one county, Nantucket. The Commission was established “In order to plan for the orderly and coordinated development and protection of the physical, social, and economic resources of the Island of Nantucket.” The Commission is advisory, making recommendations to “implementing bodies” that it may deem to be beneficial. Commission Members The NP&EDC is composed of 12 members, 9 from various Town agencies and 3 members at-large. During fiscal year 2010, the following individuals served on the NP&EDC:  Nathaniel Lowell, Chair (re-elected June 2010), Planning Board  Brian Chadwick, Vice Chair (re-elected June 2010), Member at-large  Charles “Jack” Gardner, Member at-large  Andrew Bennett, Conservation Commission  Sylvia Howard, Planning Board  Rick Atherton, County  John McLaughlin, Planning Board  Barry G. Rector, Planning Board  Linda Williams, Planning Board  Donald T. Visco, Member at-large  Jeffrey Willett, Department of Public Works  Bertyl V. Johnson Jr., Housing Authority A review of the NP&EDC activities between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010 is as follows: Area Planning Process A key aspect of the adopted Master Plan (April 2009) is the continuation of a locally-based citizen planning process known as “area plans,” which the NP&EDC oversees. Warrant articles to implement the Surfside Area Plan, approved by the Commission on August 3, 2009, advanced to Town Meeting in April 2010. Preliminary work organizing and establishing boundaries of the Brant Point area was finalized by the establishment of the work group in June 2010. Ocean Planning and Alternative Energy The State’s Ocean Plan was released on schedule in January 2010 pursuant to the Massachusetts Oceans Act (Chapter 114 of the Acts of 2008). Staff and Commission members have been active participants since May 2008 and have spent a great deal of time during the fiscal year focused on related issues. A home rule petition passed in 2009 (Article 67), giving the NP&EDC limited review power over large-scale developments, was resubmitted and passed as Article 63 at the 2010 Annual Town Meeting. Page 80 In regard to the areas south and west of Tuckernuck and Muskeget Islands, the Commission voted to continue to explore the feasibility of a community-scale installation of up to five wind turbines and secured the right to erect a research tower on Muskeget. Commission members, Town and state officials and staff attended meetings of the Mineral Management Services, who are exploring leasing rights in areas of the ocean south of Nantucket. The Commission has been aided by consultant Stephen Barrett of Harris Miller Miller and Hanson, Inc. utilizing District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) funds granted to Regional Planning Agencies (RPAs) from the state. Mr. Barrett assisted the Town’s Energy Study Committee in securing a grant funding award to the Town for a proposed wind project at the landfill. Erosion The Commission expressed an interest in a concept of shoal modules developed by Joe Farrell of Resolve Marine that might have application to reduce impacts of erosion in six separate areas experiencing devastating loss around the Island. At the close of the fiscal year, staff is developing a strategy and resources to investigate the experimental application of a project for the future. Housing Planner/Specialist Fiscal year 2010 was the first complete year there was a full time staff position dedicated to the creation and retention of affordable housing. The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) approved the Town’s submission of a five year Housing Production Plan (HPP). The HPP document is available on the planning office website. www.nantucket-ma.gov/Pages/NantucketMA_Planning/housing. There continues to be widespread need across all low and moderate income levels and family size for assistance with both locating and preserving affordable housing. Considerable time this year was devoted to apply for DHCD’s CDF-1 2010 competitive grant seeking $800,000 for income qualified home owners to receive fifteen year “forgivable” loans to make critical home repairs. Two grant requests were written requesting funding for community housing efforts from the Community Preservation Committee (CPC): a $900,000 request for programmatic funding for the newly created Affordable Housing Trust Fund (AHTF) and $87,517 request for funding the position of the Housing Planner/Specialist. A CPC article granted $525,789 to the AHTF to fund both the Housing Planner/ Specialist position and programs beginning FY 2011. The Annual Town Meeting brought the passage of a several articles for the disposition of vacant Town- owned properties for affordable housing and the sale of parcels where all or a portion of the proceeds would be given to the AHTF. The AHTF established its Declaration of Trust, developed a mission statement and outlined desired programs for the retention and creation of housing. Examples include: subsidizing units in private development projects, preserving as affordable existing units, or taking an active role in acquiring property and developing affordable housing. These efforts will include leveraging CPC funds, creation of new housing units, preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of existing affordable housing units, and support of affordable housing programs of other agencies. Smart Growth The Commission scored 117 out of 140 points for 2009-2010, which was the second highest score in the Commonwealth (Note: Northampton has been first in the state since 2005-2006). This was an improvement to our previous scores of 105 points in 2008-2009, 109 points in 2007-8, 105 points in 2006-7, and 98 Page 81 points in 2005-6, largely due to adoption of the Master Plan and related implementation measures related to zoning. Open Space Plan The Town’s Open Space Plan, prepared by consultant Jeff Thibodeau, and coordinated by staff was approved by the State Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA) on February 22, 2010, bringing Nantucket into compliance not achieved since 1993 and again making the community eligible for certain open space and recreational grants. Economic Development A workshop with the Southeastern Economic Development (SEED) non-profit was held at the Bartlett Farm Hayloft on June 10, 2010. ReMain Nantucket assisted with the workshop by providing refreshments and Kate Hamilton of Visitors Services provided marketing and help with press releases and notification. It is hoped that small businesses might be assisted by these programs. The Commission and staff continued work in strengthening and revitalizing the downtown, examining redevelopment sites as well as transportation and parking issues. Wilkes Square (Candle Street) Redevelopment Site Planning Office staff managed and coordinated the contract of CBT Architects for the Town in exploring the redevelopment opportunities in an area of the downtown core containing the former electric company generation facility, tank farm, grocery store (Grand Union), and central parking lot. A series of public meetings, presentations and release of materials occurred between October, 2009 and January, 2010. A final report is due in July and direction about implementation from “implementing bodies” is expected within the next fiscal year. Land Transfers/Roads and Right-of-Way Takings The Planning Office assisted in both the development of warrant articles authorizing the Town to dispose of surplus land and the removal of “paper” streets and the implementation of actions necessary for completion. Staff continues to assist the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager in closing out past real estate articles including transfers for open space, public access, affordable housing, and “yard sale” conveyances to abutters. Examples include (1) finalizing the cross conveyances of parcels, layout of roads, and establishing parcels within the industrial area located east of the airport using DLTA funding and with permitting completed by the Land Bank; (2) substantial closeout of the former West Tristram Avenue (Phase I) “yard sale” parcels; (3) sale of 20 Clifford Street (former tax-title parcel); and (4) sale of surplus road parcels at Sherburne Turnpike. The latter parcels (3 and 4) brought over $1 million in one-time revenue to the Town. Other Legislation The Commission has been actively involved with our state legislative team: Senator Rob O’Leary and Representative Tim Madden, on various initiatives other than those discussed above and home-rule petitions. These include:  Comprehensive Land Use Reform and Partnership Act (Senate Bill 2482): At the close of the fiscal year, promising legislation emerged to update Massachusetts’ obsolete zoning enabling laws. Commission members testified and written comments were submitted throughout ongoing hearings. The NP&EDC voted to support the legislation at its June 2010 meeting. Page 82  Wind Energy Siting (House Bills 3605 and 4687, Senate Bill 2260 (formerly 2260)): The Commission has also been monitoring legislation which might have impacts to land-based wind turbines, as have other regions with so-called “wind-rich” resources. Concerns about the scope of this bill have yet to be resolved and it is currently stalled.  DLTA Funding in FY2011: Commission members, Town officials, and staff testified before state committees on regionalization and others to continue this important funding, which has offset reduction in staff and budgetary reductions. The Commission expresses its sincere thanks to Senator O’Leary and Representative Madden for their continued diligence on behalf of important planning issues affecting Nantucket. Transportation The NP&EDC works with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, and the Town and County of Nantucket, to improve the safety and convenience of residents and visitors by developing a program of long-range transportation improvements. The objective of these improvements is to promote pedestrian, bicycle, and transit usage. Greater usage of these modes as an alternative to automobile use will reduce congestion and enhance safety. The following initiatives support these objectives.  Milestone Road and Bike Path Resurfacing and Maintenance The NP&EDC, through the Town, coordinated with MassDOT to fund the pavement resurfacing and other maintenance work for Milestone Road and the Milestone bike path. The work was completed in the summer of 2010 and financed with federal funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).  Cliff Road Extension Bike Path The NP&EDC, through the Town, has continued coordinating the design and permitting necessary to construct the extension of the existing path along the north side of Cliff Road from Crooked Lane to Sherburne Turnpike. The bike path should be advertised for construction in July 2010.  Hummock Pond Road Bike Path The NP&EDC, through the Town, initiated the design of a bike path along Milk Street, between Prospect Street and Hummock Pond Road, and along Hummock Pond Road, between Vesper Lane and Cisco Beach. Due to the length of the project and funding constraints, the path will likely be built in phases with the initial section to be built between Somerset Lane and Bartlett Farm Road.  Evaluation of the Downtown Parking Supply The NP&EDC completed an evaluation of the supply of public parking to determine how many parking spaces, if any at all, the downtown area was deficient in providing. The evaluation compared the parking requirements of land uses in the study area, and the utilization of parking spaces during peak periods, with the existing parking supply. This evaluation began in November 2008 and was accepted by the NP&EDC in February 1, 2010.  Park and Ride Study A shuttle between the ferry terminals and a mid-island located parking and ride was a recommendation of the 2008 Downtown Traffic Study to help alleviate some of the summer time traffic around the terminals. This study began in May 2009 in coordination with the Steamship Authority and the NRTA and evaluated route options and vehicle types with the associated costs of each option. The study was accepted by the NP&EDC on March 25, 2010, and efforts will continue to identify funding sources to implement at least a test season for the service. Page 83 Administration Budget impacts and a hiring freeze have resulted in the ongoing vacancy of the Land Use Planner position for a second year. The Commission recognizes its dedicated staff of:  Andrew V. Vorce, AICP, Director  Leslie Woodson Snell, AICP, Senior Planner  T. Michael Burns, AICP, Transportation Planner  Susan Bennett Witte, Housing Specialist  Jeromette Hicks, Office Administrator  Catherine Ancero, Planning Board Administrative Specialist  Venessa Moore, Planning/ZBA Assistant  John Brescher, ZBA Administrator Respectfully submitted, Nathaniel Lowell Chairman ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS Massachusetts law mandates that where a community elects to restrict or regulate the rights of property owners through a zoning bylaw, “it shall provide for a zoning board of appeals.” The Nantucket Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) exists because, in 1972, Nantucket voters chose to adopt a zoning bylaw at the Annual Town Meeting. The bylaw’s purpose is to “promote the health, safety, convenience, morals and general welfare of Nantucket’s inhabitants, to lessen the danger from fire and congestion and to improve the town...” Chapter 139 of the Code of the Town of Nantucket sets out the powers and duties of the ZBA and for the most part parallels the power and duties set out for such boards by Commonwealth law. The ZBA has the power to grant variances and special permits, and hear and decide appeals from certain decisions of the Building Commissioner or Zoning Enforcement Officer. Variances may be granted under narrowly defined circumstances where “owing to circumstances relating to the soil conditions, shape, or topography of [the] land or structures” which are unique to that land or structure and do not generally affect other land or structures within the same zoning district. The ZBA also considers how a literal enforcement of the bylaw would involve substantial hardship to the landowner. The bylaw further restricts variances to situations where “granting relief would not result in substantial detriment to the public good or derogate from the intent and purpose of the bylaw.” A variance is not generally considered appropriate if a landowner creates his/her own hardship. Special permits may be granted by the ZBA for any number of structural alterations, to waive certain requirements, or to allow certain uses. Depending on the type of relief requested, the ZBA makes such findings as to whether the proposed uses or waivers are in harmony with the general purpose and intent of the Zoning Bylaw. In the case of an expansion or alteration of a pre-existing nonconforming use or structure, the ZBA must find first whether the project entails an increase in the nonconforming nature of the Page 84 property, and then find that said expansion or alteration is not substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconformity. The majority of applications for special permits seek permission to alter or expand “pre-existing, nonconforming structures or uses”. This results from the fact that most lots and dwellings in many zoning districts, particularly in the downtown and mid-island areas, were existing from a time prior to the 1972 enactment of the Zoning Bylaw, which in most cases makes a property “grandfathered“, or protected from having to be brought into compliance with current Zoning Bylaws. The ZBA receives a significant number of applications seeking relief from parking and loading zone requirements. The ZBA is empowered by the Zoning Bylaw to waive up to 100% of the off-street parking and loading zone requirements in all zoning districts by special permit. In addition, many residential areas contain properties that are used for commercial purposes that pre-date 1972 and any changes to those uses require special permit relief. In fiscal year 2010, the ZBA considered 77 applications, up from the 69 considered in fiscal year 2009. Of the 77 applications, the ZBA granted 17 variances, heard one appeal, and granted 52 special permits. Five of these applications were withdrawn and two were denied. The majority of the denials were due in large part to the applicant requesting relief from a self-imposed hardship. The ZBA also granted the new Police Station on 4 Fairgrounds Road a height variance. The ZBA consists of five regular members and three alternate members who are appointed by the Board of Selectmen in staggered terms of five years for regular members and three years for alternate members. In fiscal year 2010, Michael J. O’Mara served as Chairman, Dale Waine served as Vice-chairman, and Edward Toole served as Clerk. Also serving were Lisa Botticelli and Kerim Koseatac, with Susan McCarthy, Mark Poor, and Carol Cross as alternates. Respectfully submitted, Michael J. O’Mara Chairman ZONING ENFORCEMENT The Zoning Enforcement office is located within the Building Department on the second floor in the Town Annex Building at 37 Washington Street. Questions on zoning matters are accepted in person, by phone (508) 325-7578 or fax (508) 325-7579, or by letter. Complaints regarding possible zoning violations should be submitted in writing, and signed; all complaints received in this manner will be reviewed. Permitting In fiscal year 2010, the office reviewed 1,162 applications for building permits and 552 applications for Certificates of Occupancy (CO) for a total of 1,714 requests for permits. Building Permits Of the applications for building permits, 34 requests were formally denied (i.e. by letter of denial). The most common reasons for formal denial include: existing structures built without the appropriate permits (e.g. sheds, showers, additions), open permits for completed projects, and noncompliance or nonconformity with the Zoning Bylaw or required/issued special permits. Page 85 Certificate of Occupancy Thirty six applications for Certificates of Occupancy were denied. Reasons for denial vary and are particular to the property in question. However, most instances of denials involve a violation of the Zoning Bylaw and/or issued special permits or variances. Enforcement Forty two requests for enforcement were received. Of the requests, 35 resulted in violation notices/enforcement orders and $4,200 dollars in fines were levied against five separate violators. Respectfully submitted, Marcus Silverstein Zoning Enforcement Officer Page 86 PUBLIC SAFETY REPORTS NANTUCKET EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Our fiscal year 2010 efforts continued to focus on three primary areas: emergency sheltering, emergency communications, and National Incident Management training. I am happy to report that we have made tremendous progress in toward achieving our objectives in each of these focus areas. Regarding emergency sheltering, we worked with the Cape and Islands Chapter of the American Red Cross to prepare our primary and secondary shelters for use in a disaster situation. We have stored over 20,000 ready to eat meals and maintain a stock of other supplies to be available for use at a moment’s notice. The Red Cross has stationed additional emergency relief supplies in trailers on the Cape ready to be deployed to the Islands if a disaster is approaching. With our on-island supplies and the availability of the Red Cross’s pre-staged equipment, I feel that we are now better prepared to address any concerns than we have been in the recent past. We have at least three locations with roofs, food, bedding, and emergency generation capabilities available for emergency sheltering on Nantucket. Currently the High School is our primary shelter and the Town-owned facilities at 2 Fairgrounds Road and the DPW Garage on Madaket Road are our secondary facilities. The Red Cross has trained a handful of local volunteers to staff and operate these shelters during a time of crisis. As we head into the 2010 hurricane season, we are confident that our shelters will be professionally staffed and operated in the most efficient manner possible. The Emergency Operations Center (EOC), located at 2 Fairgrounds Road, continues to be the primary location from which government response and relief operations will be coordinated during times of emergency. The EOC and the Nantucket Amateur Radio Association (NARA) have worked toward improving communications Island-wide when disaster strikes. For instance, we now have a functional radio link to the state EOC in Bridgewater, MA that is essential to coordinating any response to a hurricane. NARA has also developed a plan to provide operators in the emergency shelter and the Nantucket Cottage Hospital when those facilities are operating under emergency conditions. In order to be eligible for future federal disaster and homeland security funding opportunities, all local governments are required to insure that first responders are trained in the federal National Incident Command System (NIMS). This system requires that almost everyone in local government and even private organizations that provide health care and public utilities must be trained and certified to various levels. Although most of this training can be accomplished online some advanced courses required for firefighters and police officers must be done in the classroom setting. At the close of the fiscal year Nantucket’s first responders have meet the standards for NIMS training currently in effect. Respectfully submitted, William J. Pittman Emergency Management Director Page 87 FIRE DEPARTMENT In fiscal year 2010 the Nantucket Fire Department was able to accomplish several of its long term goals, including the Firemen’s Funds Heritage Corporation upgrade of the vehicle extrication equipment for Rescue 1; honoring the 125th anniversary of the Sconset Fire Station; accepting delivery of a new front line fire engine to replace an older 1993 fire engine; hosting the Massachusetts State Fire Chiefs meeting; and receiving town meeting approval of the replacement of an aging 1996 front line engine to be delivered in FY 2012. Members of the Fire Department, in conjunction with the Barnstable Fire Academy, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, and District 1 Department of Conservation and Recreation, completed training and updating of the following disciplines: emergency response guide protocols; urban wildland interface; advanced vehicle extrication; large area search; ladders; and ventilation. There was continued EMS training for protocol changes and a department of Public Safety EMS refresher. Maintaining a high level of training is crucial for the Nantucket Fire Department. This enables us to safely and professionally handle the various emergencies we encounter throughout the year. Fire Suppression/EMS Responses The Fire Department responded to 3,823 requests for assistance over the year. The calls break down as follows: Fire 40 EMS 1,142 Hazardous Condition 292 Service Call 687 Alarm Activations 968 Inspections 694 Fire Prevention/Fire Alarm/Code Enforcement The position of Fire Prevention Officer was filled in October, 2009 after more than a year vacancy. In addition to continued code compliance, inspections, and fire drills for schools, healthcare facilities, and other public buildings, new programming began in earnest with October’s Fire Prevention Week. Over 160 preschool students visited the station for education and tours. Over 35 middle school students participated in the state’s Arson Watch Reward Program and the artwork of two Cyrus Pierce Middle School students were honored by the state Fire Marshal and displayed in the State House during this year’s Fire Prevention Week. “Work Place Safety” programs were developed and delivered to both public and private businesses including evacuation planning and fire extinguisher training. The Fire Alarm Division had a challenging yet productive year with the planning and reviewing of major commercial projects. In addition with continued growth, preplanning, and expansion, the wireless master box system moves forward with its development. This system allows the department to monitor commercial properties and also provides the responding firefighters with an increased amount of information regarding the situation they are responding to. Page 88 Inspections Fiscal Year 2010 Smoke Detector Inspections 231 Certificate of Occupancy Inspections (with Building Department) 234 Fire Alarm Inspections 51 General Safety Inspections/Site Inspections/Hazard Inspections 78 Sprinkler System Installation Inspections 5 Other Inspections 95 Inspection Total 694 Permits Issued Fiscal Year 2010 Above/Underground Tank Removal 67 Black Powder 1 Cannon 2 Clambake 3 COI Inspections 215 Fire Alarm 6 Fireworks 2 Grill Permits 302 LP Tanks 120 Oil Burner 52 Open Burning 32 Smoke/CO Detector 252 Sprinkler System Installation 2 Tank Truck Inspection 0 Permit Total 1,056 Respectfully submitted, Mark C McDougall Fire Chief POLICE DEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT MISSION We, the members of the Nantucket Police Department, exist to serve all people within our jurisdiction with respect, fairness, and compassion. We are committed to the prevention of crime and the protection of life and property; the preservation of peace, order, and safety; the enforcement of laws and ordinances; and the safeguarding of constitutional guarantees. With community service as our foundation, we are driven by goals to enhance the quality of life, investigating problems as well as incidents, seeking solutions and fostering a sense of security for individuals and the community as a whole. DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW The Nantucket Police Department is managed and directed by the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief of Police and two Lieutenants. The Department is composed of the Chief’s Office and two divisions: the Administrative Support Division and the Operations Division. Page 89 Chief’s Office The Office of the Chief consists of Chief William J. Pittman and Lieutenant Jerry Adams and is responsible for the overall management of the Police Department. Lieutenant Adams serves as the department’s liaison with the Cape and Islands District Attorney’s Office, coordinating the prosecution of offenders in the Nantucket District and Superior Courts. Administrative Support Division The Administrative Services Division, commanded by Deputy Chief Charles Gibson, consists of the Administrative Support Section, Information Services Section, Fleet/Building Maintenance Section, and the Professional Standards Section. Operations Division The Operations Division, commanded by Lieutenant Angus MacVicar, consists of the Patrol Section, Investigations Section, Special Operations Section, and the Training Section. CAREER MILESTONES The following individuals have been hired by the Town of Nantucket as full-time police officers during fiscal year 2010:  Officer Joshua Croft was hired on September 23, 2009; his hometown is Palmer, MA.  Officer John Hubbard was hired on September 23, 2009; his hometown is Millbrook, NY. The following police officers have resigned from the Town of Nantucket and accepted employment as police officers in other communities:  Officer Michelle Banks-Fotev, who was appointed on June 15, 2007, separated from the Town on April 26, 2010 to pursue further education.  Officer Michael D. Wells, who was appointed on April 20, 2007, separated from the Town on June 25, 2010 after accepting an appointment as a police officer for the Town of Yarmouth, MA. DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS In April 2009 the voters at Town Meeting approve the construction of a new police station on Town-owned property at 2 Fairgrounds Road. Construction started in July 2009 and it is anticipated that the building will be completed and the Police Department moved in before Thanksgiving Weekend, 2010. Construction of this facility has consumed a considerable amount of administrative manpower time this fiscal year. In June 2010 we implemented a new program to replace the Summer Special Officer program used in the past to provide extra manpower to patrol the core district, beaches, and bike paths of the Island. In past years we hired 40 Summer Specials, swore them in as Special Police Officers with the power to make arrests and used them to address many of the issues that occurred throughout the Island. But, because of the shrinking budget, limited training opportunities, and the extreme liability that it carried with it we implemented a new strategy using Seasonal Employees in a non-law enforcement manner. We hired 30 Community Service Officers that were charged with the mission to serve as the eyes and ears of the department in the core district. We also deployed them to watch our bike paths and beaches as part of their routine duties. The following chart provides a summary of the crime statistics generated by your calls for service requests over the past fiscal year and a summary of the revenues generated from the fees that you pay. Page 90 SUMMARY OF CRIME STATISTICS ARRESTS FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 Drug Offenses 173 98 51 33 DWI Offenses 91 110 116 73 All Other Offenses 638 343 559 364 Total Arrests 902 551 726 470 PART 1 REPORTED CRIMES FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 Homicide 0 0 1 0 Rape (includes unfounded and included offenses) 12 12 12 7 Robbery 0 2 2 1 Assault 80 118 156 143 Burglary 88 66 58 114 Larceny 379 372 375 439 Auto Theft 29 16 17 12 Arson 2 1 0 0 Total Part 1 Crimes 590 587 621 716 OTHER OFFENSES FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 Weapons/carry/possess 5 5 3 2 Forgery 2 6 3 4 Property Reported Lost or Stolen 597 381 440 524 Property Damage – Vandalism 222 176 156 172 Drug Offenses Reported 77 46 58 83 Family Offenses – Domestic 175 157 166 103 General Police Services 14,009 17,030 19,085 20,973 Disturbance - Noise Complaints 234 622 549 530 Disturbance – General 518 466 443 309 Fish and Game Violations 47 42 69 48 Public Service 560 852 730 680 Total Other Offenses 16,446 19,783 21,702 23,428 MOTOR VEHICLE STOPS/CRASHES FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 Motor Vehicle Stops 2,661 4,367 2,533 2,331 Motor Vehicle Crash Reports 415 490 463 394 Motor Vehicle Fatalities 0 1 0 1 FEES COLLECTED FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 Beach Permits $327,950 $350,900 $303,454 $360,525 FID/Pistol Permits $21,375 $20,225 $7,600 $5,675 Taxi Permits $11,100 $10,700 $9,050 $7,450 Parking Permits $25,660 $31,260 $38,865 $43,540 Parking Fines $391,535 $292,947 $283,146 $221,010 Alarm Registration Fees $158,587 $79,375 $166,064 $123,150 All Other Fees $29,113 $5,269 $5,910 $6,349 Total Fees Collected $965,320 $790,676 $814,089 $767,699 Page 91 It has been an honor to serve Nantucket as the Police Chief for the past 5 ½ years and to work with the many fine men and women of the Nantucket Police Department. As we move into the next year we will do so with an objective to better serve you. Respectfully submitted, William J Pittman Chief of Police Groundbreaking of the new Public Safety Facility Page 92 SCHOOL REPORTS NANTUCKET PUBLIC SCHOOLS This report is a summary of school departments for FY 2010 and was prepared by Data Coordinator Michael Horton on behalf of Superintendent Dr. Robert Pellicone. Dr. Pellicone left the Nantucket Public Schools on June 30, 2010. The vision of the Nantucket Public Schools (NPS) is to inspire the pursuit of personal and academic excellence in a dynamic learning environment that brings out the best in each of us. Our mission is to engage students in a process of learning and discovery that cultivates their unique strengths and talents, meets their diverse educational needs, and promotes social responsibility. The 2009 - 2010 academic year was Dr. Robert Pellicone’s fourth year as the Superintendent of Nantucket Public Schools. His administrative team included: Glenn Field, Assistant to the Superintendent for Business; Joe Aguiar, Principal, Nantucket Elementary School (NES); Caryl Brayton Toole, Principal, Cyrus Peirce Middle School (CPS); John Buckey, Principal, Nantucket High School (NHS); Nina Locario, Director, Special Services; Jack McFarland/Dave Kanyock, Facilities Managers; Pauline Proch, Director, Nantucket Community School; Chris Maury, Athletic Director; Karen McGonigle, Technology Director; Michael Horton, District Data Coordinator; and George Kelly, Director of Student Services. Academic year 2009-2010 School Enrollment NHS September 2009 380 students June 2010 377 students CPS September 2009 266 students June 2010 268 students NES September 2009 587 students June 2010 588 students TOTAL September 2009 1,233 students June 2010 1,233 students Enrollment by grade: Nantucket Elementary School Pre Kindergarten Kindergarten Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Sept. 2009 27 85 92 109 88 101 85 June 2010 27 87 95 108 89 97 85 Enrollment by grade: Cyrus Peirce School Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Sept. 2009 92 85 89 June 2010 91 87 90 Enrollment by grade: Nantucket High School Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Sept. 2009 98 107 92 83 June 2010 95 107 89 86 In the summer of 2009, the leadership model at Nantucket Elementary School was restructured. Joe Aguiar, a former principal of Nantucket High School, returned from retirement to serve as the Interim Supervisory Principal of NES. Nina Slade was hired as the Associate Principal for grades pre-K through 2 Page 93 and Krista Connelly was hired as the Associate Principal for grades 3 through 5. Michael Horton was hired as the District Data Coordinator, but located at NES to focus on the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s Corrective Action and Restructuring responsibilities for the elementary school. The position of Assistant Superintendent was eliminated for the FY 2010 year and its responsibilities were delegated to building principals, the District Data Coordinator, the Special Services Department, and the Technology Department. The school district has a responsibility to ensure parents that all teachers are licensed in the area of their instruction. This is a No Child Left Behind Act requirement. Through a few in-house staffing changes, the district achieved the Title II 97% target requirement of teachers being Massachusetts licensed in core subject areas. The school district continues to cultivate relationships between the district and local organizations and agencies with related interests. For example, the District collaborated with the Maria Mitchell Association, the Nantucket Historical Association, the Nantucket Builders’ Association, Strong Wings, and other community organizations to provide students with enrichment opportunities. In addition, for the fourth year in a row the Nantucket Golf Club recognized the work of two outstanding educators, NES reading teacher Mary Kate Tarpey and NHS world language teacher Jill Surprenant with its Excellence in Teaching Award. Nantucket Public Schools MCAS Scores The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) is the Commonwealth’s state-wide assessment program developed as part of the Education Reform Act of 1993. The focus of the MCAS is to evaluate students’ knowledge of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Every public school student, including students with disabilities, must participate in the MCAS. Furthermore, schools and districts must make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in student performance on the MCAS as part of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001. AYP targets are based upon the goal for grade level aggregates in grades 3 through 8 and grade 10 to attain a Composite Performance Index (CPI) score of 100 (proficient) in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics by the year 2014. Students in grade 10 must earn a proficient score to earn a high school diploma. Retest opportunities are provided in grades 11 and 12 for students not earning a proficient score in the grade 10 test administration. Students in grade 5 and 8 also participate in the science and technology/engineering assessment. Students in grades 9 and 10 have the option of choosing one science test in the areas of Biology, Chemistry, Introductory Physics, or Technology/Engineering to earn a proficient score to meet state graduation requirements. The State is also required to oversee Corrective Actions or Restructuring of schools and districts that do not meet their AYP goals for four consecutive years. Highlights of Nantucket’s achievements as a district in the 2009 - 2010 school year resulting from the MCAS given during the spring of 2010 are as follows:  Nantucket High School continues to make AYP in both English Language Arts and Math.  96% of high school sophomores met the competency requirement for ELA. 92% met the requirement for Math. The remaining students have additional retest opportunities in the fall and spring of their junior year, and if needed, also during their senior year.  A review of groups of students moving through the schools shows that, over time, students improve their scores between grade 3 and grade 10. Page 94  The NHS aggregate MCAS score in ELA was a 91.8. The score for math was an 86.6. NHS continues to be on track to make the 100 aggregate target in 2014.  CPS also made AYP in both ELA and math. The ELA scores improved by 3.4 points to 91.5. Math scores improved by 6.7 to a 77.3. Since the school did not make AYP for math in FY09, CPS continues to be labeled into Improvement Year 1 for its NCLB status in math. Schools have to make AYP for two consecutive years to remove the need for Improvement label.  The NES ELA scores decreased by 2.3 CPI points to a 76.7 and failed to make AYP. Although NES made AYP last year in ELA, the school now enters its first year of Restructuring for ELA for FY 2011. NES math scores increased by 2.4 CPI points to a 71.8, but also failed to make AYP. This is now the second year NES is placed into Restructuring for math by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). However, administrators are thrilled about the unexpected improvement in math when it is typical to experience an implementation dip when implementing a new math program. FY 2010 was the first year that NES adopted Math Expressions as its core math program. Special Services The Special Services Department at Nantucket Public Schools is committed to an inclusion philosophy, in which children with special needs are integrated into our regular education classrooms and co-curricular activities whenever possible. This approach is not only mandated by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, but helps all of our students learn as a community of individuals with unique strengths and challenges. When special services are provided in classrooms, in our activities, and on our playing fields, all students benefit. System-wide services for students, ages 3 through 22, include academic classroom support, behavioral classroom support, specialized instruction in individualized or small group settings, substantially separate programming for students with significant special needs, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, physical therapy, parent consultation, counseling, social skills instruction, early intervention support, extended school year services, assessment, and diagnosis. Program focus areas during the 2009-2010 school year included the planning of a new initiative at NES, and continued support for the Language-Based Learning Disabilities (LBLD) Program at CPS. The elementary school’s Options program is a substantially separate, therapeutic classroom for students who have been identified with significant emotional and behavioral challenges. The program is designed for approximately five to eight students who will receive academic instruction, social skills development, counseling, and intensive behavioral supports. Each student’s program will be individually developed with opportunities to participate in regular education programming as much as possible. The district consulted with Walker Partnerships of Needham to assist in the design of the program. The program will be implemented in fall, 2010. The Special Services Department also continued its focus on the CPS Language-Based Learning Disabilities Program. This is a partial inclusion program that provides meta- cognitive, language-based instruction for identified students. The District continued to work with Ann Larson of Landmark Associates for consultation and design. Approximately 180 students were provided services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) during 2009 - 2010. Page 95 Nantucket High School Nantucket High School enjoyed a successful year of academic and athletic achievement, as well as accomplishments in the fine, applied, and performing arts. During the 2009 - 2010 academic year, the school successfully submitted its five-year accreditation report, which was accepted by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. NEASC continued the high school’s accreditation, adding 21 commendations and acknowledgements of our school, staff, and programs. Among these were the addition of a community service requirement for graduation, our new teacher mentoring program, and open enrollment for course selection. NHS offered several new courses for students, including half-year elective courses, which were developed locally by our teachers. Examples include Latin, foods and nutrition, printmaking, personal finance, and film study, among others. One hundred percent of NHS graduates successfully completed the MCAS test. The school improvement plan monitors academic achievement and a safe climate/culture at the school. Both goals saw improvement with notable improvements in Advanced Placement scores and participation rates in our co-curricular programs – clubs/activities and interscholastic athletics. In June 2010, John J. Buckey, completing his second year as principal of Nantucket High School, led 85 graduates through graduation exercises. The class of 2010 saw 80% of its graduates continue on to some form of post-secondary education. Caroline Stanton and Ashley Clinger were named Nantucket Golf Club Foundation scholars and numerous other graduates received generous scholarship aid, which totaled in the hundreds of thousands of dollars from Island donors and organizations. Cyrus Peirce Middle School At Cyrus Peirce, faculty and staff strive for academic excellence. The instructional program at Cyrus Peirce is designed to meet the needs of all students and provide academic rigor in a supportive environment. Our mission is to engage students in a process of learning and discovery that cultivates their unique strengths and talents, meets their diverse educational needs, and promotes social responsibility. The mission of Cyrus Peirce Middle School is to prepare students to grow intellectually and socially in a supportive yet challenging environment and to provide them with 21st century skills for success in high school and beyond. In addition to a rigorous academic curriculum, our exploratory curriculum is designed to meet the developmental needs of young adolescents and to provide an extension of the academic curriculum allowing students to be exposed to various areas of interest in order to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. Through our work in focusing on the school mission, our students will be models of good character, effective communicators, innovative problem solvers and decision makers, collaborative workers, and self-directed learners. Nantucket Elementary School 2009 - 2010 was a busy year at Nantucket Elementary School. The administrative team and teachers took on several new projects. The change in schedule to half-day Wednesdays provided the time necessary for the school to implement the initiatives. Through collaboration and professional development on Wednesday afternoons the teachers: embraced Responsive Classroom as the management model for the school, designed and introduced a standards-based report card, implemented Math Expressions as the new core math program, developed writing binders with the 6+1 Traits of Writing program, and met regularly with literacy coaches from Joyce Goldweitz Associates, the DESE, and the Bay State Reading Institute. These vast changes at NES are driven by required Corrective Actions due to the school’s No Child Left Behind Act status. Page 96 A math curriculum committee was created and examined several math programs. They determined that the major contributor to low math MCAS scores was the inconsistency in math curriculum and instruction from grade to grade. In the summer of 2009, Math Expressions, published by Houghton-Mifflin, was purchased to be the consistent school-wide program from kindergarten through grade 5. Implementation, training, and professional development in math was a focus throughout the year. In addition, teachers identified writing proficiency as a stumbling block for students on the MCAS, particularly for the open response questions. The 6 + 1 Traits of Writing program was decided to be implemented in the 2009 – 2010 school-year, accompanied by appropriate teacher training and professional development. Nantucket Elementary School contracted with Teachers 21 to hire Jenny Tsankova as a math coach for the 2009 – 2010 school year. Mrs. Tsankova has experience with the new math program to be implemented. NES also contracted with the Bay State Reading Institute to hire two reading coaches: Sarah Hewitt for early literacy and Joyce Goldweitz to implement Read Naturally in the intermediate grades focusing on MCAS test-taking strategies. In addition, Madi Coutts was hired as a writing coach to assist in the implementation of the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing program. In the summer of 2009, the decision to extend the school day ten minutes to 2:30 pm was approved by the Nantucket Teacher’s Association. At the same time, the school community decided to pursue early dismissals on Wednesdays to provide the necessary time for teachers to implement the new math and writing programs as well as a commitment to increase our focus on other quality professional development opportunities designed to bring the school out of Corrective Action. The Nantucket Community School was integral in this proposal to provide after school options for children on the half-day Wednesdays. Nantucket Community School The Nantucket Community School worked collaboratively with Nantucket Public Schools this year to include programs such as the Forsyth Dental program, NES half-day Wednesday initiative, Arts and Discovery programming, and Homework Heroes at CPS. In addition the Community School continued to provide a variety of children’s programs such as dance programs like Pre-Ballet, Ballet, and Creative Movement. Summer camps continue to provide coverage for our summer families, as well as our year- round families for children pre-school through 13 years of age. Our partnership with ReMain Nantucket, which generously provides us with the Greenhound building downtown, enables us to provide adult daytime classes. We continue with our ESL classes, as well as a healthy choice of adult education to suit all needs, winter, spring, summer and fall. The Community Pool provided many opportunities for those young and old to enter the pool for either recreational, fitness, or learning experiences. The pool is open to the public almost 40 hours per week for Adult Lap and Family Swim hours. We offer a variety of membership options to the public. We continue to offer American Red Cross “Learn to Swim” classes for ages three and a half years old and up. Our public school students from grade three up to high school seniors had access to swim classes within their physical education curriculum. Our competitive youth swim team offered children ages five to 18 six months of a competitive experience in the Southeastern Massachusetts Swim League. The Community Pool is also the home to the Nantucket High School Varsity Swimming and Diving team. Our popular Aquacise and Hydrofitness program, offered to our adult swimmers, was well attended year-round three times a week. Page 97 Technology Department The Nantucket Public Schools Technology Department is responsible for all infrastructure, systems, applications, classroom tools, repair and maintenance, coordinating mandated state and federal data collection and reporting, and staff professional development in the use of these systems and applications. During the school year 2009 - 2010 the District redesigned its website, added computers and interactive white boards to classrooms, and upgraded a CAD/CAM lab. The library system and the cafeteria Point-of- Sale systems were also upgraded. The District participated as a pilot district for the expansion of state data collection and reporting for student, staff and course data and was awarded a grant to enable automated transfer of this data between the district student information system and the state data warehouse. Facilities During the summer and fall of 2009, work at the Nantucket Elementary School included skylight and flat roof renovations and the replacement of a 15,000 gallon underground fuel oil storage tank. At the Cyrus Peirce Middle School work was performed to complete roof renovations and to replace a 5,000 gallon underground fuel oil storage tank. The Nantucket High School kitchen was outfitted with new vinyl non-skid flooring and ovens. Other improvements included a new domestic hot water boiler and furnace burner replacement. In December of 2009, the Nantucket Public Schools saw the passing of Jack McFarland, Director of Facilities from August 9, 1998 to December 15, 2009. Special Recognition  Mary Moores retired in June 2010 after 35 years of service as a music teacher at Nantucket Elementary School.  Nina Locario retired in June 2010 after 35 years of service as the director of special services for Nantucket Public Schools.  Carolyn Childs retired in June 2010 after 10 years of service as a math teacher at Nantucket High School.  Jim Dalzell retired in June 2010 after 31 years of service as a guidance counselor at Nantucket Elementary School and Nantucket High School.  Margot Howes retired in June 2010 after 12 years of service as an administrative assistant to the Cyrus Peirce middle school and athletic department. On September 1, 2009, Dr. Pellicone announced that he would not be seeking a renewal of his contract. The School Committee formed a superintendent search committee and began interviewing candidates in February of 2010. The committee moved to hire W. Michael Cozort, a former Superintendent of the Year while serving the Shaker Regional School District in New Hampshire. Mr. Cozort begins his tenure as Superintendent on July 1, 2010 for FY2011. Respectfully submitted, Michael Horton, District Data Coordinator on behalf of Dr. Robert Pellicone, former Superintendent of the Nantucket Public Schools Page 98 COUNTY REPORT REGISTRY OF DEEDS The Registry of Deeds is a recording office and research library for land transactions in Nantucket County. Instruments recorded in this office include deeds, mortgages, easements, liens, and subdivision plans. The public has access to all recorded land records dating back to 1659. Our offices are located in the Town and County Building at 16 Broad Street. The recording office is open from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM and from 1:00 PM to 3:45 PM. The two research offices are open from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Our statistical report for fiscal year 2010 is as follows:  The total number of instruments recorded was 6,797.  The total revenues received and disbursed was $3,324,729.74. Revenues disbursed to the County were as follows: Recording fees and copies $170,785.70 Interest 145.85 Minus bank charges - Other monies - Deeds Excise Fund1 1,013,267.52 Total $1,184,199.07 Revenues disbursed to the state were as follows: Deeds Excise2 $1,628,324.52 CPA Surcharge3 130,090.00 Technology Fee4 34,505.00 State Recording Fees5 347,757.00 Total $2,140,676.52 Our total number of instruments recorded increased 2% from last fiscal year. Our total revenues from recording fees increased minimally (1%) from last fiscal year. Our total revenues from Deeds Excise increased 24% from last fiscal year. (See superscript 2 below for definition of Deeds Excise). 1From July 1 to December 31, 2009 the Deeds Excise Fund was 42.5% of the total deeds excise revenue. This percentage was divided as follows: the Sheriff’s Department received 75%, County General Fund received 15%, and Registry of Deeds received 10%. As a result of the state takeover of the Sheriff’s office, beginning January 1, 2010 the Deeds Excise Fund is 10.625% of total deeds excise revenue, divided as follows: County General Fund receives 60% and Registry of Deeds receives 40%. An additional 30.552% of total deeds excise, up to $250,000 per fiscal year, is collected and dedicated to the Public Safety Facility. 2Deeds Excise is excise tax paid on the consideration of deeds and other instruments that transfer interest in property. From July 1 to December 31, 2009 the state Department of Revenue received 57.5% and Page 99 42.5% went into the Deeds Excise Fund. As of January 1, 2010 the state Department of Revenue receives 89.365% and the County Deeds Excise Fund receives 10.625% (see above). 3The Massachusetts Community Preservation Act has both local and state funding components. A portion of the state funding is collected by the Registry of Deeds, and consists of a $20 surcharge on filing fees. The state Department of Revenue receives these funds. These surcharges help pay for the acquisition, creation, and preservation of open space for recreational use, the acquisition and preservation of historic places, and the creation, preservation, and support of community housing. 4Chapter 4 of the Acts of 2003 created the Technology Fund. The $5 technology fee is charged on all filing fees. The state Department of Revenue receives this fee, which is to be used by the Registries for technology advances. The Technology Fund as been extended through June 30, 2016. 5Chapter 4 of the Acts of 2003 also raised the recording fees. The state Department of Revenue receives all the increased fees. These fees were generated to help raise revenue for the Commonwealth. Accomplishments for fiscal year 2010 include the following:  New version of masslandrecords.com tested and updated  All staff completed mandatory Conflict of Interest training through the State Ethics Commission Our goals for fiscal year 2011 are:  To continue our ongoing restoration project of old records  To move to the new version of masslandrecords.com Our current staff consists of Register Jennifer H. Ferreira, Assistant Register Kimberly A. Cassano, and Administrative Assistant Jessica Gage Respectfully submitted, Jennifer H. Ferreira Register of Deeds Page 100 TOWN AND COUNTY COMMITTEE/COMMISSION REPORTS ABATEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE The three-member Abatement Advisory Committee meets monthly during the year and as required by the Tax Assessor during the tax-billing season. Due to the timing of the fiscal year 2010 revaluation, during one of the worst economic times in years, public perception was that assessments should have been much lower. Total abatement applications filed exceeded all prior years with 943 real property applications received. The committee met diligently each week over the summer months and was able to process all appeals in a timely manner. Respectfully submitted, Judith A. Moran Chairwoman ADVISORY COMMITTEE OF NONVOTIING TAXPAYERS The purpose of the Advisory Committee of Nonvoting Taxpayers (ACNVT) is to convey to the Board of Selectmen the concerns of seasonal Nantucket residents who vote in other jurisdictions. These residents of Nantucket pay approximately 80% of the residential real estate taxes collected by the Town. During fiscal year 2010, six public meetings were held beginning July 18, 2009 and ending June 26, 2010. During these meetings the committee had the opportunity to hear about Town issues from four Selectmen as well as from the Town Manager, the Chair of the Finance Committee, and the Island’s state representative to the General Court. Committee members brought to the meetings reports of issues raised by seasonal residents. For a two-way exchange directly between Town officials and seasonal residents, the committee co-sponsored (with the Nantucket Community Association) a second Summer Forum. The expectation is that such forums will be annual events for questions and answers following presentations by the Selectmen and the Town Manager. Other Town officials attend as resources and to become mindful of concerns expressed. The committee made the following recommendations:  That the Town consider engaging a grant writer on a commission basis to assist Town departments in applying for funds  That the 2009 Special Town Meeting vote in favor of an increased Town share of Room Occupancy Tax and local meals tax  That the Town’s Board of Health be an independent entity  That the Town support continuance of Sherburne Commons  That the Town adopt zoning changes per the Madaket Master Plan  That the Town seek enhanced security for the in-town tank farm Page 101 The committee considered without recommendation:  That the Town’s supervisory personnel have non-union status  That traffic congestion at the Sparks Avenue and Surfside intersection be addressed Respectfully submitted, Howard Blitman Chairman BEACH MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE The Beach Management Advisory Committee continues its most important role as a forum for the public to bring forth beach issues and for questions from the Board of Selectmen. It also reviews and, if necessary, suggests revisions to the Beach Driving Map of the Island annually. During the past year the committee was instrumental in formulating amendments to the Beach Management Plan, which included limiting capacity on beaches, eliminating glass products, and establishing the supervision of ATV patrols by a full-time officer. It pursued increased public awareness of beach issues through the news media and helped improve the oversight of large beach events. Respectfully submitted, Maureen Beck Chairman CEMETERY COMMISSION WORKGROUP The Cemetery Commission Workgroup was formed pursuant to the vote on Article 75 of the 2006 Annual Town Meeting and is now in its fifth year of operation. Members include Catherine Flanagan Stover, Chair; Alan Reinhard, Vice-chair; Liz Coffin; Bill Steelman; Diane Holdgate; Penny Snow; Carol Marks; Jim McIntosh; and Susan Handy. Visitors to the Memorial stone at Founders Burial Ground Page 102 A public ceremony to rededicate the Founder’s Burial Ground memorializing the first English Settlers was held, and was very well-attended. Fran Karttunen, Representative Tim Madden, and Reverend Ted Anderson contributed to the celebration of community in word and prayer. Music from the era was provided by Mollie Glazer. The enthusiastic response from the public regarding memories for the women sparked an effort to erect a stone for that purpose. The Committee is grateful for, and continues to use, funds from the Community Preservation Committee. These funds are earmarked for continuing restoration work to be done at the historic Town cemeteries, and additional professional assessment of our burial grounds. An article was included in the 2010 Annual Town Meeting Warrant requesting that a Home Rule Petition be filed with the Legislature to allow Nantucket to have a separate Cemetery Commission. The operation of cemeteries town-wide, and all the duties and obligations of that are too numerous for five part-time Selectmen to manage. A Cemetery Commission would be responsible for selling grave lots and plots, maintaining the Town-owned cemeteries, and overseeing the operations thereof in conjunction with a Municipal Cemetery Department. Again, if anyone would like to share any information about any interment on Nantucket, or show us the exact location of your loved ones, or family lots, please contact us. We welcome any and all information, and will document all. Respectfully submitted, Catherine Flanagan Stover Chair COMMISSION ON DISABILITY The Nantucket Commission on Disability represents and advocates for the needs and interests of the disabled community living on or visiting Nantucket Island. It is the goal of this commission for the disabled population to fully integrate and participate in the Nantucket Community. “Access for All” is the commission’s objective. The commission worked to accomplish the following goals in the fiscal year 2010:  Continued to work with the Town to improve access for disabled pedestrians on the sidewalks, crosswalks, and intersections throughout downtown and the surrounding areas.  Continuation of the Disabled Parking Permit Program for disabled, Nantucket residents.  Through Linda Williams’ efforts and with the cooperation of Nantucket Cottage Hospital, many disabled residents and visitors were able to attend and enjoy the 2009 Boston Pops concert on Jetties Beach.  Continue to communicate with Island businesses to raise accessibility awareness, and help them to improve access in their buildings.  Work with the Building Department to ensure accessibility compliance of new and renovated commercial structures. Page 103  Periodically provide information on services and products that may be helpful to the disabled, Nantucket population.  Worked with the Steamship Authority and helped to create policies that would benefit disabled and elderly passengers. The commission also worked with the Steamship Authority to make changes in the vessels and terminals that would help disabled and elderly passengers safely access the terminals and vessels. The commission has set several priorities for fiscal year 2011: The commission will continue to further the community’s awareness of accessibility issues, and strive to improve day-to-day living for the disabled population on Nantucket. In addition to continuing our past objectives, the commission hopes to accomplish the following:  Continue to develop a relationship with disability advocates on Martha’s Vineyard and the Cape to discuss and collaborate on mutual accessibility concerns that involve the Islands and the Cape.  Continue to help educate the Island’s building industry in regards to accessibility concerns.  Work with the Parks and Recreation department to create more outdoor, accessible, public recreation areas.  Work with the Island’s preservation groups to create more outdoor, accessible recreational areas. Respectively submitted, Milton C. Rowland Chairman COMMUNITY PRESERVATION COMMITTEE In September 2000, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts enacted the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act (CPA). The CPA is the enabling statute that provides the authority for communities to establish a local Community Preservation Fund that derives its revenue primarily from a surcharge of up to 3% of the community’s local property tax. In April 2001, Nantucket became one of the first communities to adopt this Act. This landmark statue provides cities and towns with an additional tool to preserve open space, preserve historic buildings and sites, and provide affordable housing. At least 30% of the annual receipts are dedicated with 10% going to each category and the remaining 70% dedicated for one or more of these purposes in accordance with local priorities. The Act also establishes a statewide Community Preservation Trust Fund drawn from a surcharge of $20 on most filings at the Registry of Deeds and land filings at the Land Court. These surcharges provide matching funds to communities and increase the dollars that can be spent on community preservation. The Nantucket Community Preservation Committee makes recommendations to Town Meeting for the acquisition, creation, and preservation of open space, the acquisition and preservation of historic resources, the creation, preservation, and support of affordable housing for the community, the rehabilitation or restoration of such open space, historic resources, land for recreational use and community housing that is acquired or created. Since inception, more than $22 million in CPA funding has been awarded to various Nantucket initiatives which have fallen more or less equally within the three areas of Page 104 focus of the CPA as follows: 37% for affordable housing, 35.6% for historic preservation and 24% for open space and recreation. 3.4% was used for administration purposes. In fiscal year 2010, the CPC reviewed, assessed, and ranked 21 applications for CPA funding for fiscal year 2011. Funding for 16 projects, totaling $2,400,000, was approved by the citizens of Nantucket at the 2010 Annual Town meeting as follows: Open Space, Conservation and Recreation Town of Nantucket  Public access to open space acquisition fund for Properties, phase 2 $100,000 Town of Nantucket  Survey plan for Weeweeder Valley open space $10,000 Nantucket Park and Recreation Commission  Creation of multi use field complex on Nobadeer Farm Road Phase 3 $300,000 Nantucket Park and Recreation Commission  To complete the security at the skate park $20,000 Open space reserves  Reserves for future years $130,000 Subtotal $560,000 Community Housing Interfaith Council  Housing and rental assistance program $95,000 Housing Nantucket  Scattered site house recycling program $150,000 Habitat for Humanity Nantucket, Inc.  Construct new Habitat for Humanity house $250,000 Town of Nantucket, Affordable Housing Trust Fund  Creation of affordable housing in numerous ways $525,789 Sub total $1,020,789 Historic Resources Nantucket Fireman’s Association  Hose cart house restoration $25,000 South Church Preservation Fund  Restoration of the plaster and decorative painting, phase 3 $375,000 St. Paul’s Church  Restoration of stained glass windows, phase 2 $77,900 Nantucket Historical Association  Preserving oral histories by digitization, phase 2 $50,000 Town Clerk’s Records Restoration  Preservation and restoration of town records, final phase $79,900 African Meeting House  Restoration of interior structure and historic windows $52,800 Town of Nantucket, Department of Public Works  Restoration of granite posts and fence at Civil War Monument $60,000 Artist’s Association of Nantucket  Restoration, cleaning and framing of works in the permanent collection $5,400 Page 105 Sub total $726,000 Administrative Community Preservation Committee  Administrative and operating expenses $93,211 Total $2,400,000 By the time that this report is printed, many of the above projects will be on their way to completion. Many more projects beckon in the future to preserve our precious community. The Community Preservation Act continues to offer a unique opportunity to fund community projects that would probably never be realized or take several years and significant financial burdens to complete. Respectfully submitted, Ken Beaugrand Chairman NANTUCKET CULTURAL COUNCIL The Nantucket Cultural Council was allocated $4,000 from the state to put towards local arts, humanities, and science based projects. There were thirteen applicants and six grants approved: Spoken Word Nantucket; Nantucket Boys and Girls Club; Cape Symphony/Public Schools; Nantucket Atheneum; Nantucket Arts Council; and the Dreamland Foundation. Allocations have been reduced by the state over the last few years and $4,000 is one of the lowest allocations to date. Council members include John Belash, Barbara Gookin, Amy Jenness, Dave Provost, and Aaron Marcavitch. Respectfully submitted, Aaron Marcavitch Chair ENERGY STUDY COMMITTEE MISSION STATEMENT  Report to the Board of Selectmen on energy related issues which may affect Nantucket’s residential, commercial, and municipal electric users.  Recommend policy or code amendments as appropriate.  Evaluate and explore potential energy production for Nantucket as needed.  Serve as a resource for information on renewable and sustainable energy technologies, energy conservation and any energy related issues with relevance to Nantucket Island. Page 106 The committee is composed of: Barbara Gookin, Chairman; Anne Miller Kuszpa, Vice Chairman; Sandra Hubicsak-Welsh, Secretary; T. Michael Burns; Carl Borchert; Peter Morrison; Whitey Willauer; and Brian Chadwick, Selectman Liaison. The Nantucket Energy Study Committee meets monthly on the first Thursday of each month at 5:00 PM at the Board of Selectmen's conference room at 16 Broad Street from January through April, and at the 2 Fairgrounds Road conference room from May through December. Additional meetings and workshops held as needed. The Energy Study Committee's webpage on the Town of Nantucket’s website is www.nantucket-ma.gov/Pages/NantucketMA_Planning/energycom. Respectfully submitted, Barbara Gookin Chairman HARBOR AND SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD The Harbor and Shellfish Advisory Board (SHAB) is a seven member elected group whose mission is to advise the Board of Selectmen on the duties of the Harbormaster and Shellfish Warden and “other duties and responsibilities as may be necessary for the proper use and management of the water and shellfish of the Town of Nantucket.” The serving officers are Peter Boyce, Chair; Fred Holdgate, Vice-chair; and Bancel LaFarge, Secretary and Treasurer. Additional members include Bill Blount, Wendy McCrae, Robert Rank, and Doug Smith. Early in the year SHAB developed a set of goals against which to measure its actions. On the political front, SHAB held a public hearing on House bill H796, which would further regulate the Striped Bass fishery and would end commercial fishing for Striped Bass in Massachusetts waters. Summarizing comments at the meeting, SHAB sent a letter of support for parts of the bill, such as limiting the keep of recreational anglers to one fish per day, but objecting to the closure of the commercial Striped Bass fishery, citing the importance of the fishery to Nantucket. SHAB also declined to accept a wording change in the Home Rule petition before the General Court which would have limited their proposed exception to state conflict of interest laws. All members of SHAB took and passed the online state ethics test. Dr. Boyce participated in the selection process under which the new Town Shellfish Biologist was hired. SHAB also examined the protocol under which boats would be recalled if the temperature should drop during the day and agreed that the procedure for how boats were recalled should be left to the discretion of the Harbormaster. SHAB discussed the harmful algal bloom (HAB) due to the organism Cochlodinium polykrikoides (the so- called rust tide). SHAB heard from the Maria Mitchell Association scientists that there had been 40% mortality of their caged seed scallops, and a complete lack of seed scallop set in some spat bags at the same time as the HAB was in progress. Throughout the year, SHAB supported the development of Article 68 on the April 2010 Annual Town Meeting. After the meeting Dr. Boyce and Ms. McCrae were appointed as SHAB representatives to the Article 68 Work Group whose tasks are to “perfect” the wording of Article 68, and to develop a comprehensive plan to limit the amount of nutrients being added to Nantucket’s waters through inappropriate use of fertilizer. SHAB strongly supported efforts to find funding for and move forward with the Page 107 development of a comprehensive Shellfish Management Plan (SMP). Dr. Boyce and Mr. Smith were appointed to the committee which developed the RFP for a SMP. As the year ended, the contract for SMP development was being finalized. Respectfully submitted, Dr. Peter Boyce Chairman NANTUCKET HISTORICAL COMMISSION Members of the commission include Diane Coombs, Caroline Ellis, Phil Gallagher, Deborah Timmermann, and Mark Voigt. The Historical Commission, charged under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8d, has a mission to promote the preservation and protection of historic and prehistoric sites, landscapes, buildings, places, and districts of interest through the coordination and development of studies, plans and guides. The commission continues to work towards better implementation of existing criteria for historical preservation of buildings and land/archeological sites, and works towards creating new criteria for further preservation efforts on Nantucket. The commission is concentrating on education to instill an awareness of the value in keeping interiors of structures intact as well as the exterior, and to work with homeowners and commercial building owners in guiding them in the process of placing interior restrictions on their homes. We have made plans to participate in Preservation Week with several guided tours of historic interiors. Respectfully submitted, Deborah Timmermann Chairman ROADS AND RIGHT OF WAY COMMITTEE The vision of the Roads and Right of Way Committee is to preserve access to Nantucket’s public and private lands, including our harbors, coastline, ponds, moors, conservation lands, and historical sites. Access is one of the greatest gifts the Town of Nantucket can protect for our current and future citizens. Our mission is to review any issues concerning the status of access over public and private roads, rights of way, abutters ways, proprietors roads, footpaths, and any other ways throughout Nantucket County, and to make recommendations to the Board of Selectmen/County Commissioners to ensure and improve public access over them. FY 2010 was a year of further accomplishment for the committee. Our main projects included installation of new granite “public way” monuments throughout the Island. Locations of the second twelve monuments have begun. In addition, we have located and cleared brush from existing concrete public way monuments Page 108 placed in the 1970’s. Locations of these public way monuments will be mapped and placed in the public record with the Town Clerk. The committee also organized and sponsored the naming and rededication of the Founders Burial Ground off Cliff Road after working for six years to provide access to this historic cemetery. In December 2009, the committee organized the creation, placement and dedication of the Women’s Monument at Founders Burial Ground in honor of the 350th anniversary of Nantucket’s first European settlers. Two public way infrastructure projects rose to the top of our list of recommendations to the County Commissioners: the taking of the private roads from the airport to Surfside Road and rebuilding the roadway to county standards; and improvement to First Way from Hooper Farm Road to the schools with engineered speed controls for vehicles and a bicycle/multi use path with proper down lighting, from Hooper Farm Road. Both of these infrastructure improvement projects will benefit the entire Island community by improving safety and access to the public schools, and recognition of the public’s use of the private roads leading from the airport to the west end of the Island. Estimates have been received for each of these capital projects and recommendations have been made to the Selectmen. The committee also worked with the DPW and Town officials to clear the invasive plants along the Washington Street Extension public way across the old railroad bed. Granite “public way” monuments now mark each end of this path. The next step is developing a safe way for bicycles and pedestrians to reach the beginning of the Milestone and Old South Road bicycle paths at the Rotary. We also recommended laying out a bicycle route/footpath connecting the Prospect Street path to the Madaket Road bike path. The aim of this project is to improve the hazardous link between these two major bicycle/pedestrian ways to Surfside and Madaket. The current public access between these two major pedestrian ways is hazardous due to lack of sidewalks forcing bicycles, walkers, and children to walk in the street with vehicles traveling this busy route. In addition to the Mill Hill to Winn Street route, our committee recommended sidewalks be installed by the DPW where feasible to provide some measure of safety for residents and walkers in the area. In March, our committee was charged by the Selectmen to address the issue of access over the private abutters ways between Baxter Road and the Sconset Footpath. D. Anne Atherton and Harvey Young were asked to co-chair a subcommittee to resolve long-standing issues regarding public access, maintenance, a management plan, rights and responsibilities of use of this public way. The subcommittee will work over the summer and issue a final report in mid-November, 2010. In June, granite “pedestrian walkway” monuments with arrows and signs indicating public access were installed at Great Harbor Yacht Club from Union Street to the harbor beach along Washington Street. Our committee assisted in the creation, placement, and installation of these public footpath markers, part of the Chapter 91 license regulations providing public access to the state’s coastal shoreline. Our plan for a Nantucket Greenway system, based on similar programs in England and on Block Island is under development. The purpose of this project is to link conservation and Town-owned properties throughout Nantucket County by a series of cross-Island walking paths. These projects are part of our Right of Way Improvement Plan, a guide as we work to clarify and improve the public’s right to access Nantucket’s lands. The Roads and Right of Way Committee includes D. Anne Atherton, Secretary; Annie Bissinger-Poor; Nat Lowell; Sylvie O’Donnell; Allen B. Reinhard, Chairman; Lee Saperstein; John Stackpole; Harvey Young, Vice Chairman; and Brian Chadwick, Selectmen representative. Our committee has a presence on the Page 109 Town’s website www.nantucket-ma.gov under committees, on which can be found minutes of our meetings, the ROW Improvement Plan, “A History of Roads and Ways. . .” and other reports and information. Our meetings are open to the public and usually held on the third Tuesday of each month at 2 Fairgrounds Road at 4:00 PM. Respectfully submitted, Allen B. Reinhard Chairman SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE The Town of Nantucket Scholarship Committee derives its income from donations through tax bills each year. The committee appreciates taxpayer commitment to the Town of Nantucket Scholarship Fund and looks forward to generous support in order that individuals may continue their post high school educations. Awards provided by the committee are given to Nantucket residents returning to school after long absences, college students seeking post-graduate studies, current college undergraduates, and students just starting their college careers based on the needs of the individuals and their academic achievements. Twice a year when tax bills are sent out, a form is included to allow for donations. Any amount is greatly appreciated. Unlike scholarships given by the Nantucket High School to graduates, this committee is solely funded through the generosity of the taxpayers. The following scholarships were awarded in fiscal year 2010: Benjamin Ferrantella (Thomas F. Curley Scholarship) Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology $1,000 Haley Cabre University of Vermont $800 Sean Donnan UMass Dartmouth $800 Kristie L. Flaherty Simmons College $800 Melissa Holdgate University of Rhode Island $800 Heather Munnelly Marist College $800 Gary Pillion, Jr. Western New England College $800 Aimee Ross Simmons College $800 Brittany Watson Culinary Institute of America $800 Respectfully submitted, Jeanette Topham Chairman Page 110 COMPENSATION REPORTS The following amounts represent gross compensation for full and part-time regular employees for the 2010 calendar year. The figures include overtime; shift differentials; educational incentives; longevity and/or holiday, as well as retroactive pay subsequent to settlement of collective bargaining agreements. For public safety personnel, figures may include amounts paid by private parties through the Town for third-party detail work. EMPLOYEE NAME DEPARTMENT GROSS INCOME MARKS, ANDREA M ADULT COMMUNITY DAY CENTER 24,869.67 RICHROD, MARY L ADULT COMMUNITY DAY CENTER 35,123.90 AGUIAR, MATTHEW AIRPORT 50,249.24 ALLEN, GARRETT W AIRPORT 80,384.68 AMOAGDEI, PETREA AIRPORT 13,564.44 BELL, PAMELA K AIRPORT 110,257.97 BUCKLEY, BLAINE C AIRPORT 101,577.82 BULL, KEVIN E AIRPORT 13,255.50 BUSH, ROBERT T AIRPORT 17,836.50 CALDERON, ANGEL L AIRPORT 11,719.88 CROOKS, DEBRA A AIRPORT 99,327.35 DAVIS, JOHN A AIRPORT 75,103.40 DUNHAM, MATTHEW K AIRPORT 50,179.49 ENCARNACION SANTANA, DIEGO AIRPORT 12,417.00 ENCHEV, PETAR S AIRPORT 11,702.28 FABISZAK, MICHAEL F AIRPORT 5,520.00 FALCONER, ADDISON D AIRPORT 64,740.49 FOWLER, PETER B AIRPORT 73,064.94 GETMAN, WILLIAM AIRPORT 3,122.00 GRANGRADE, JOHN F AIRPORT 93,010.48 HANSON, LARA S AIRPORT 9,086.75 HARDY, JANE A AIRPORT 7,154.25 HARIMON, PRESTON J AIRPORT 103,206.23 HEINTZ, LEISA M AIRPORT 80,620.32 HOLDGATE, ROBERT M AIRPORT 72,733.31 JONES, RANDOLPH G AIRPORT 15,401.50 KAVALIAUSKAS, GIEDRIUS AIRPORT 163.15 KIEFFER, KRISTIAN P AIRPORT 70,480.72 KING, BRUCE L AIRPORT 86,639.39 LETENDRE, PAUL A AIRPORT 68,153.76 LIBURD, LEONARD I AIRPORT 75,426.41 MACK, CATHERINE M AIRPORT 58,460.82 MARKS, JEFFREY F AIRPORT 132,095.24 MOONEY, TIMOTHY D AIRPORT 85,978.81 MUHLER, TED B AIRPORT 72,378.56 NELSON, SHANROY C AIRPORT 64,848.80 NORTON, JEANNE B AIRPORT 803.00 O'NEIL, MICHAEL J AIRPORT 76,616.05 PACHECO, EDUARDO J AIRPORT 13,538.50 Page 111 PARTIDA, JORENE A AIRPORT 61,963.48 PETERSON, ALFRED G AIRPORT 133,661.86 PIHL, EMILY L AIRPORT 8,298.50 PINEDA, NOE AIRPORT 72,453.70 SMITH, THERESA M AIRPORT 129,830.14 SPENCE, NOLAN E AIRPORT 16,291.88 SYLVIA, DAVID S AIRPORT 116,921.37 TALLMAN, ROBERT L AIRPORT 98,406.63 TAYLOR, YOLANDA J AIRPORT 60,169.67 THOMAS, BARBRA T AIRPORT 8,594.25 TORMAY, JOSEPH H AIRPORT 57,834.05 TORRES, JANINE M AIRPORT 102,139.94 TYLER, PATRICIA P AIRPORT 52,228.27 WALKER, MATTHEW T AIRPORT 1,251.25 WELLINGTON, FREDERICK O AIRPORT 81,932.33 WHEELER, JACK F AIRPORT 91,653.07 MCLAUGHLIN, JOSEPH J BOARD OF ASSESSORS 600.00 MORAN, JUDITH A BOARD OF ASSESSORS 600.00 RANNEY, H FLINT BOARD OF ASSESSORS 600.00 BARRETT, ANNE P BUILDING 64,857.32 BARTLETT, BERNARD BUILDING 117,855.66 BUTLER, STEPHEN J BUILDING 97,860.23 CIARMATARO, WILLIAM D BUILDING 92,479.45 HULL, KAREN P BUILDING 61,400.11 LARRABEE, WILLIAM W BUILDING 79,167.74 NICHOLSON, JEFFREY J BUILDING 735.00 NOLL, ALAN BUILDING 17,055.00 PATERSON, THOMAS J BUILDING 540.00 RAMOS, EDMUND J BUILDING 2,055.00 SILVERSTEIN, MARCUS BUILDING 81,644.20 SWAIN, JOSEPH M BUILDING 1,950.00 MCDONOUGH, BRENDA R COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 6,622.50 RICHEN, NEVILLE COMMUNITY PRESERVATION COMMITTEE 37,987.50 BROWN, MICHAEL A COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 31,138.50 CHASE, JOHN T COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,785.75 CROOKS, DEREK S COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 11,608.50 CRUGNALE, NICHOLAS COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 11,989.50 DAVIS, MARIA COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 9,352.50 DEVLIN, ZACHARY J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 9,735.75 DUGAN, KEVIN T COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 29,323.40 JOHNSON, NATHANIEL COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,019.75 JOYCE, ANDREW COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,506.00 KELLY, CHRISTOPHER J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,364.00 LEE, THOMAS COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 6,955.63 LOYCANO, BRETT J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 600.00 MACKIN, LAWRENCE COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 480.00 MAILLOUX, CURTIS COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,767.50 MCDONOUGH, THOMAS P COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,429.50 MURPHY, COLLEEN COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,041.50 MURPHY, GERALD COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,821.50 Page 112 O'BRIEN, STEPHEN COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 21,064.50 O'NEILL, MICHAEL COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 9,152.25 PERCIACCANTE, THOMAS COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 9,387.00 PERRY, RYAN P COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 11,602.50 PORTER, RYAN COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 10,540.50 REGIS, VICTOR R COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 8,167.50 RICE, BRANDON COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,818.00 SHAW, JOSHUA T COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 25,636.00 SIBLEY-LIDDLE, JOSHUA COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,957.50 SNOW, MATTHEW J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 6,655.50 SOUZA, CHRISTOPHER J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 10,069.50 TORRES, ANDREW COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,081.50 VAUGHN, ASHLEY COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 11,443.50 WELCH, DANIEL J COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 23,346.75 WELLS, DIANA R COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 4,379.50 WELLS, RICHARD H COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,314.00 WILLIAMSON, SEAN COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICERS 7,866.75 DICKEY, CATHERINE M CONSERVATION COMMISSION 61,653.76 ROGGEVEEN, DIRK G CONSERVATION COMMISSION 58,586.26 CARRERA, VIRGINIA V COUNCIL ON AGING 67,491.78 HOLDGATE, GAIL COUNCIL ON AGING 56,277.50 ROBERTS, LINDA COUNCIL ON AGING 92,362.15 BROWN, ELIZABETH M FINANCE 79,869.52 BUTLER, PAMELA FINANCE 71,379.29 DAY, LAVON K FINANCE 2,468.06 DICKINSON, ROBERT D FINANCE 76,799.85 DILUCA, MAUREEN FINANCE 66,798.66 DILWORTH, DEBORAH S FINANCE 91,774.89 ERICHSEN, THOMAS FINANCE 76,363.34 FLANAGAN, ELIZABETH M FINANCE 57,230.09 GILES, PATRICIA A FINANCE 47,280.59 HILTS, WANDA M FINANCE 78,592.17 LAPIENE, ROBIN FINANCE 49,366.57 LARIVEE, IRENE D FINANCE 87,079.12 LEWIS, KRISTA M FINANCE 72,927.84 MACDONALD, LINDA B FINANCE 30,723.82 MURPHY, PATRICIA MARY FINANCE 66,840.06 PALMER, DEBORAH A FINANCE 60,211.34 RICHEN, KATHLEEN D FINANCE 75,707.97 TRIFERO, ELLEN FINANCE 73,980.12 VOGES, CONSTANCE E FINANCE 120,275.79 WATSON WEINER, DEBORAH J FINANCE 85,704.07 ALLEN, JEFFREY M FIRE 78,446.54 ALLEN, JOHN M FIRE 75,365.74 BARBER, BEAU A FIRE 1,130.00 BARBER, NATHAN G FIRE 84,683.52 BATES, ROBERT G FIRE 138,267.22 BEAMISH, CHRISTOPHER M FIRE 70,156.12 CAVANAGH, PETER S FIRE 71,028.29 DIXON, MATTHEW C FIRE 94,459.36 Page 113 ELDRIDGE, EARL C FIRE 85,345.60 HANLON, FRANCIS FIRE 116,557.77 HOLDEN, THOMAS H FIRE 120,958.96 HULL, JEANETTE A FIRE 74,253.02 KYMER, CHARLES G FIRE 93,938.76 MAXWELL, EDWARD D FIRE 112,736.91 MCDOUGALL, MARK C FIRE 117,531.06 MCGRATH, RYAN J FIRE 4,209.42 MITCHELL, SEAN T FIRE 68,965.86 MONACO, SHAWN R FIRE 72,098.45 MURPHY, STEPHEN A FIRE 111,452.81 PEKARCIK, DAVID P FIRE 70,449.02 RAY, CHRISTIAN FIRE 102,309.26 RAY, COREY A FIRE 78,360.14 SHANNON, ELIZABETH FIRE 113,629.24 DAGESSE, KRISTINA FIRE CALL 685.00 DIXON, BROOKE M FIRE CALL 25.00 ELDRIDGE, GERALD FIRE CALL 2,550.00 ELDRIDGE, NELSON K FIRE CALL 7,145.00 FINCH, MARINA S FIRE CALL 4,492.50 GAUVIN, NORMAN FIRE CALL 275.00 GRAY, BRIAN J FIRE CALL 75.00 GRAY, DAVID FIRE CALL 170.00 GULLICKSEN, KENNETH FIRE CALL 325.00 HAMBLIN, GARY S FIRE CALL 25.00 HARDY, RALPH L FIRE CALL 180.00 HAYNES, DANIEL A FIRE CALL 245.00 HOLLAND, CHRISTOPHER D FIRE CALL 1,105.00 MACAULEY, DANIEL FIRE CALL 865.00 MOFFITT, CAROL J FIRE CALL 775.00 NICHOLAS, MAX E FIRE CALL 5,135.00 O'NEILL, MEAVE J FIRE CALL 30.00 PATERSON, NEIL FIRE CALL 325.00 RAMOS, KEVIN N FIRE CALL 3,210.00 RAMOS, ROBERT J FIRE CALL 225.00 RAMOS, SHERYL P FIRE CALL 565.00 SMITH, JARED FIRE CALL 370.00 STANTON, JOHN A FIRE CALL 5,040.00 VOLLANS, GEORGE A FIRE CALL 200.00 VOLLANS, JONATHAN FIRE CALL 115.00 WILLS, PETER S FIRE CALL 40.00 CROWLEY, ARTELL HEALTH 85,040.20 LAFAVRE, KATHLEEN H HEALTH 62,768.73 RAY, RICHARD L HEALTH 111,653.93 ROSS, HENRY C HEALTH 11,000.00 GRIEDER, JAMES HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 67,658.07 NORTON, TERRY L HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 50,409.36 VOIGT, MARK W HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 91,495.62 PERRIS, PATRICIA M HUMAN RESOURCES 87,499.90 PRATT, HEATHER A HUMAN RESOURCES 45,947.41 Page 114 WORTH, MARYANNE R HUMAN SERVICES 90,792.88 MEDINA, ANN M HUMAN SERVICES/HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM 43,723.57 MCGLOIN, PATRICK L INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 71,442.22 PORTER, NATHAN T INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 76,210.53 RHODES, LINDA L INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 89,526.85 SPROUSE, MARGARET G INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 77,835.12 BELL, JESSE A LAND BANK 64,603.82 BOYNTON, EDWARD R LAND BANK 60,520.24 CAMPESE, SUSAN C LAND BANK 27,261.50 EARLEY, ROBERT W LAND BANK 68,567.70 HUNTER, KATHRYN A LAND BANK 1,042.44 PAONESSA, BRIAN P LAND BANK 12,603.50 PERRY, BRUCE W LAND BANK 87,313.78 POLLOCK, JEFFREY W LAND BANK 77,472.81 SAVETSKY, ERIC LAND BANK 112,964.92 ANNESE, MATTHEW T LIFEGUARD 6,784.00 BARTHOLOMAE, CHARLES T LIFEGUARD 7,632.00 CABRAL, KELSEY K LIFEGUARD 8,064.00 CABRAL, LEAH K LIFEGUARD 10,424.00 CABRAL, SETH K LIFEGUARD 9,666.00 CIVITARESE, SOPHIE LIFEGUARD 5,504.00 COHEN, JAREK LIFEGUARD 6,360.00 DARDEN, PARINDA LIFEGUARD 7,568.00 ELLIS, AINSLEY R LIFEGUARD 7,072.00 ELLIS, KAITLYN A LIFEGUARD 5,984.00 EMERY, KELLY C LIFEGUARD 6,732.00 FOLEY, MARCUS LIFEGUARD 9,216.00 FREDERICKS, AILEEN LIFEGUARD 7,424.00 HERMANSDORFER, RICHARD LIFEGUARD 5,120.00 HERRINGTON, KEVIN J LIFEGUARD 9,072.00 JANGL, TIM LIFEGUARD 7,824.00 JENSEN, PETER LIFEGUARD 6,832.00 KINNANE, BRENDAN L LIFEGUARD 5,805.00 MORAN, MARISSA H LIFEGUARD 6,696.00 NEBERGALL, CHRISTIAN S LIFEGUARD 8,265.00 NEBERGALL, GREGORY W LIFEGUARD 6,593.00 O'NEILL, BRIANA F LIFEGUARD 6,912.00 PITTS, EMILY LIFEGUARD 6,656.00 REINBERGS, ERIK J LIFEGUARD 7,920.00 STOCK, MEGHAN LIFEGUARD 5,504.00 STOCK, PETER D LIFEGUARD 6,102.00 STONE, CAMERON LIFEGUARD 5,400.00 STONE, GRAYLAN Z LIFEGUARD 5,400.00 VITTORINI, BRIANA R LIFEGUARD 7,632.00 WEBB, RYAN LIFEGUARD 6,000.00 CARLSON, JEFFREY B MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 71,239.87 CIARMATARO, MICHAEL O MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 7,105.00 DOUGAN, DWAYNE M MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 74,513.15 DUNHAM, DREW MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 9,019.00 FRONZUTO, DAVID MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 115,035.97 Page 115 HECK, STEPHEN MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 8,555.00 HERR, MATTHEW MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 11,099.75 LAPPIN, KENNETH J MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 30,675.00 LUCEY, SHEILA A MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 70,517.24 MCISAAC, ELIZABETH A MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 49,157.54 PARIZEAU, DOUGLAS A MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 2,409.00 RICKLEFF, ADAM MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 4,160.00 RILEY, TARA A MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 63,129.13 SOVIE, ADIA MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 5,756.50 VANDERWOLK, CHRISTOPHER P MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 63,257.94 VIERA, JAMISON D MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES 4,270.00 ABERNATHY, PHRAKAIRASAMEE OUR ISLAND HOME 10,933.57 ARAUJO, SANDRA BEIRUTE OUR ISLAND HOME 48,986.41 ATTAPREYANGKUL, TUKI OUR ISLAND HOME 54,565.16 BALESTER, SUSAN M OUR ISLAND HOME 62,296.05 BAPTISTE, WILLARD OUR ISLAND HOME 53,419.36 BARRETT, SHEILA OUR ISLAND HOME 51,279.69 BECHTOLD, DEBRA A OUR ISLAND HOME 17,325.00 BLOISE, BRIDGETT J OUR ISLAND HOME 57,132.19 BRERETON, VIRGINIA OUR ISLAND HOME 51,864.66 BRISCOE-CIVIL, ALICIA OUR ISLAND HOME 18,451.98 CLARKE, BARBARA OUR ISLAND HOME 63,201.11 COLEMAN, OLA LEWIS OUR ISLAND HOME 62,394.96 CORREIA, KAREN OUR ISLAND HOME 63,530.36 DARGIE, PATRICIA OUR ISLAND HOME 106,931.36 DAY, RACHEL K OUR ISLAND HOME 65,118.54 DORIUS, PATRICIA A OUR ISLAND HOME 56,808.53 ELLIS, GAIL H OUR ISLAND HOME 115,905.13 ELLIS-HOWARD, MARVETTE R OUR ISLAND HOME 50,611.76 FACEY-AISZON, ANDREA OUR ISLAND HOME 2,746.13 FLAHERTY, KERRI A OUR ISLAND HOME 37,461.18 FRANKLIN, HENRY T OUR ISLAND HOME 25,478.31 GARRABRANT, WENDY M OUR ISLAND HOME 34,357.25 GERARDI, NICOLE OUR ISLAND HOME 23,212.72 GRIMES, LILIAN C OUR ISLAND HOME 32,640.39 HARRISON, JACQUELINE A OUR ISLAND HOME 58,451.06 HARRISON, MICHELLE OUR ISLAND HOME 3,566.61 HAYE, LISA OUR ISLAND HOME 28,611.00 HAYE, NADENE A OUR ISLAND HOME 69,161.22 HAYES, JOHN A OUR ISLAND HOME 68,858.09 HOLMES, JENISE J OUR ISLAND HOME 34,375.12 IRONS FERGUSON, WINSOME V OUR ISLAND HOME 31,780.23 JONES, SARA J OUR ISLAND HOME 82,956.27 KIEFFER, ERIKA S OUR ISLAND HOME 53,681.94 KING, DONNA J OUR ISLAND HOME 60,361.14 KINNEY, COLLEEN OUR ISLAND HOME 49,737.48 KOYL, NANCY W OUR ISLAND HOME 103,152.21 KYOMITMAITEE, MANEEWAN OUR ISLAND HOME 30,081.85 LAWSON, ANDREA OUR ISLAND HOME 3,111.33 LEMUS, MARIA M OUR ISLAND HOME 45,675.45 Page 116 LEVEILLE, MOIRAR OUR ISLAND HOME 29,248.49 LEWIS, FLORIS M OUR ISLAND HOME 51,401.72 LINDLEY, ANN M OUR ISLAND HOME 99,485.32 LINDO, SHAUNETTE S OUR ISLAND HOME 53,181.80 LYTTLE-LIBURD, SOPHIA S OUR ISLAND HOME 62,531.38 MACVICAR, HUGH G OUR ISLAND HOME 74,500.70 MACVICAR-FISKE, LAURIE H OUR ISLAND HOME 50,381.81 MASON-WILSON, JESSICA OUR ISLAND HOME 61,612.89 MATSON, CAROL A OUR ISLAND HOME 73,914.78 MCCARTHY RICKETTS, DENISE A OUR ISLAND HOME 62,605.48 MCGARRY, JOANNE OUR ISLAND HOME 47,469.11 MCINTYRE, MAYON I OUR ISLAND HOME 58,568.56 MCKELLOP, CLIFFORD H OUR ISLAND HOME 24,635.19 MERIAM, PAMELA OUR ISLAND HOME 102,994.88 MUNIZ PEREZ, CARLOS G OUR ISLAND HOME 9,491.30 NICKERSON, SYBIL M OUR ISLAND HOME 64,511.19 OTTS, DIANE OUR ISLAND HOME 60,293.18 OUTAR, TAMEIKA A OUR ISLAND HOME 38,471.31 PARKINSON, AVIA M OUR ISLAND HOME 60,685.33 PASK, JENNIFER OUR ISLAND HOME 31,041.90 PATTON, MARY OUR ISLAND HOME 56,327.13 PATTON, SARAH E OUR ISLAND HOME 6,055.33 PHILLIPS, FERNELLA J OUR ISLAND HOME 46,781.79 REDDING, CARLISTA OUR ISLAND HOME 13,726.11 REED, STORMY OUR ISLAND HOME 52,842.01 ROBINSON, HOPIE OUR ISLAND HOME 61,678.88 ROWE THOMAS, KEREN P OUR ISLAND HOME 48,289.40 RYDER, ELLEN B OUR ISLAND HOME 58,634.90 SANDERS, GLORIA OUR ISLAND HOME 57,637.26 STETSON, CINDY M OUR ISLAND HOME 54,729.82 THAIRAT, MATUROD OUR ISLAND HOME 49,103.73 THAIRATANA,PANUWATARA OUR ISLAND HOME 47,530.57 THAIRATANA,SEUBSIRI OUR ISLAND HOME 63,627.90 TONEY, LISA A OUR ISLAND HOME 93,476.11 TWOMEY, SHERRY OUR ISLAND HOME 47,617.38 WALLACE, HENDRICK OUR ISLAND HOME 66,256.54 WORSWICK, PRISCILLA A OUR ISLAND HOME 58,953.13 BARTLETT, CHARLES PARKS AND RECREATION 74,711.83 BERARD, PAUL R PARKS AND RECREATION 6,761.25 BOWLA-NELSON, CAROLYN P PARKS AND RECREATION 273.00 BRADBURY, ARLEIGH M PARKS AND RECREATION 7,057.50 CHARNES, ELLEN L PARKS AND RECREATION 15,270.00 CLARK, ANTHONY C PARKS AND RECREATION 1,896.00 DOYLE, ERWIN PARKS AND RECREATION 16,862.50 GILLUM, BEATRICE M PARKS AND RECREATION 243.75 GROSSHANS, NATASHA PARKS AND RECREATION 266.25 KNUTTI, EMMA C PARKS AND RECREATION 3,897.25 KNUTTI, JOHN L PARKS AND RECREATION 963.75 LAZAROVA, VANYA PARKS AND RECREATION 101.75 LEWIS, LAMARCUS PARKS AND RECREATION 4,081.50 Page 117 MANCHESTER, JAMES PRESTON PARKS AND RECREATION 102,908.57 MCWADE, ALICE PARKS AND RECREATION 17,279.30 MURRAY, JUSTIN PARKS AND RECREATION 2,453.15 NOLAN, DAVID PARKS AND RECREATION 2,873.75 PATERSON, ANGELA L PARKS AND RECREATION 6,858.75 POCHMAN, JEREMY PARKS AND RECREATION 1,872.00 RHODES, JAMES S PARKS AND RECREATION 2,320.50 SHEEHY, DANIEL A PARKS AND RECREATION 1,804.00 SHIRZAD, MARJAN PARKS AND RECREATION 71.50 ST.PIERRE, ROBERT PARKS AND RECREATION 352.50 SYLVIA, CHRIS PARKS AND RECREATION 495.00 VELINOVA, MIROSLAVA PARKS AND RECREATION 277.75 WILCE, ANDREW T PARKS AND RECREATION 56,524.10 ZITO, JOSEPH PARKS AND RECREATION 3,789.00 ANCERO, CATHERINE PLANNING 57,306.53 BRESCHER, JOHN B PLANNING 50,691.56 BURNS, THOMAS M PLANNING 87,043.42 HICKS, JEROMETTE M PLANNING 57,842.17 MOORE, VENESSA K PLANNING 32,617.02 SNELL, LESLIE W PLANNING 86,900.57 VORCE, ANDREW V PLANNING 111,743.94 WITTE, SUSAN B PLANNING 56,582.30 ADAMS, JERRY W POLICE 135,902.85 APREA, RICHARD J POLICE 95,551.21 BASSETT, FRANCES POLICE 55,842.66 BURNS, MELINDA M POLICE 56,031.02 CARNEVALE, CHRISTOPHER M POLICE 76,234.80 CHRETIEN, JARED M POLICE 111,041.13 CLINGER, SHEILA M POLICE 67,048.46 CLINGER, THOMAS POLICE 104,331.43 COAKLEY, BRENDAN POLICE 100,735.91 COOK, MICHAEL J POLICE 4,599.75 CROFT, JOSHUA R POLICE 69,606.31 ERICHSEN, JENNIFER POLICE 92,110.15 FOTEV, MICHELLE L POLICE 23,743.69 FURTADO, DANIEL J POLICE 108,931.64 GALE, SUZANNE POLICE 82,777.88 GIBSON, CHARLES POLICE 159,877.04 HIGGINS, WILLIAM J POLICE 65,737.30 HOLLIS JR, ROBERT J POLICE 69,916.36 HUBBARD, JOHN E POLICE 70,789.99 LANDRY, DOUGLAS W POLICE 39,506.02 LEMENAGER, MICHAEL POLICE 67,217.65 MABARDY, MICHAEL S POLICE 82,015.71 MACK, DANIEL POLICE 121,336.52 MACK, JEROME P POLICE 88,727.17 MACVICAR, ANGUS C POLICE 128,731.08 MAHONEY, DAVID E POLICE 82,792.43 MANSFIELD, KEITH A POLICE 101,008.34 MARSHALL, KEVIN POLICE 114,492.21 Page 118 MAULDIN, JANINE M POLICE 96,582.16 MCINTYRE, HOWARD A POLICE 121,130.04 MORNEAU, BRETT S POLICE 90,645.04 MUHR, JOHN J POLICE 107,274.27 NEE, MICHAEL P POLICE 82,895.66 PACHECO, RICHARD A POLICE 69,106.86 PITTMAN, WILLIAM J POLICE 167,495.83 QUIGLEY, SCOTT F POLICE 76,426.47 RAY, TRAVIS R POLICE 114,047.62 ROCKETT, JOHN F POLICE 98,929.16 ROGERS, KEVIN M POLICE 86,339.22 SPERA, PATRICK J POLICE 88,103.94 SULLIVAN, WILLIAM P POLICE 99,070.04 TORNOVISH, STEVEN A POLICE 83,455.11 WELLS, MICHAEL D POLICE 37,448.07 BATCHELDER, HARTLEY G PUBLIC WORKS 68,714.53 BOUCHER, PAUL A PUBLIC WORKS 80,607.59 BRAGINTON-SMITH, JOHN PUBLIC WORKS 77,622.71 CLARKSON, PAUL D PUBLIC WORKS 75,552.51 CRANE, ANNE MARIE PUBLIC WORKS 60,085.44 DECKER, RICHARD K PUBLIC WORKS 58,790.33 DOYLE, OSAGIE N PUBLIC WORKS 39,729.61 DRISCOLL, CAROL J PUBLIC WORKS 27,059.60 DUARTE, DOMINIC PUBLIC WORKS 80,335.83 GARY, ARDIS A PUBLIC WORKS 63,613.22 GARY, WILLIAM W PUBLIC WORKS 71,677.36 HAMMOND, KENNETH M PUBLIC 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SCHOOL 88,535.12 ALGER, COURTNEY SCHOOL 25,509.51 ALLEN, DENESE B SCHOOL 800.00 ALLEN, DOREEN A SCHOOL 50,246.50 ALLEN, JENNIFER L SCHOOL 30,000.00 ALMODOBAR, DARIAN V SCHOOL 103,805.68 ALOISI, JOHN SCHOOL 88,050.73 ALOISI, LYNNE M SCHOOL 76,979.47 ANDRADE, FRANK M SCHOOL 544.00 ANDREWS, SARAH K SCHOOL 520.00 AUSTIN, URSULA SCHOOL 35,544.17 AVERY, DEANNA SLAYTON SCHOOL 92,131.23 BARNES-HARRINGTON, MAEVE SCHOOL 35,892.60 BARONE, JONATHAN SCHOOL 877.50 BARRETT, CHRISTINA SCHOOL 4,720.00 BARRETT, LINDA M SCHOOL 4,785.00 BARRETT, MARILYN B SCHOOL 93,401.31 BARTLEMAN, KATE E SCHOOL 16,397.18 BARTLETT, MARYANN SCHOOL 1,937.50 BARTLETT, SEANDA B SCHOOL 30,962.37 BASKETT, FRANCES E SCHOOL 93,271.23 BATEMAN, JESSICA E SCHOOL 70,531.88 BAUM, CHRISTOPHER D SCHOOL 1,375.00 BAUMGARTNER, SARAH E SCHOOL 65,863.63 BEARD, AMANDA E SCHOOL 390.00 BEAUCHEMIN, JULIE SCHOOL 4,091.25 BELANGER, SUZANNE SCHOOL 13,218.75 BELL, FOREST SCHOOL 1,562.50 BELL, JONATHAN SCHOOL 27,447.43 BENDER, STEPHEN L SCHOOL 12,060.00 BENNETT, JOHN F SCHOOL 37,970.62 BENSON, ANDREW SCHOOL 1,020.00 BENSON, KATHLEEN M SCHOOL 78,145.51 BERNARD, GRACE G SCHOOL 15,571.63 BERRY, JENNIFER SCHOOL 19,672.65 BILLINGS, ALYSSA B SCHOOL 88,447.24 BIXBY, BEVIN D SCHOOL 11,862.16 BIXBY, LUCY B SCHOOL 18,143.61 BLAIR, RICHARD H SCHOOL 6,890.00 BLASI, KATHERINE W SCHOOL 32,619.47 BOOMS, JEFFREY SCHOOL 625.00 BOWERS, ALEXANDRA SCHOOL 20,429.28 BOYCHEV, DIMO SCHOOL 16,731.45 BOYCHEVA, VERONIKA B SCHOOL 54,292.16 BOYES, MEGAN E SCHOOL 20,674.16 BRANNIGAN, JANET B SCHOOL 93,601.11 BRANNIGAN, MICHELLE S SCHOOL 82,151.47 BRAYTON TOOLE, CARYL SCHOOL 72,736.08 BROWERS, MEGAN M SCHOOL 31,516.58 Page 120 BROWN-COHAN, ERIN SCHOOL 322.50 BROWNE, ALLISON SCHOOL 150.00 BROWNE, MAEBH F SCHOOL 425.00 BUCCINO, ROBERT SCHOOL 79,941.10 BUCKEY, JOHN J SCHOOL 128,467.14 BULL, KELLY A SCHOOL 880.00 BURNETT, MAKIESHA SCHOOL 415.00 BUTLER, KARLA SCHOOL 98,395.40 BUTLER, PATRICIA A SCHOOL 19,820.50 BYRNE, LAURA SCHOOL 2,000.00 CABRE, HALEY SCHOOL 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SCHOOL 125.00 CONNON, ROBERT M SCHOOL 6,625.00 CONNORS, MARY BETH SCHOOL 93,183.35 CORBETT, KELLY SCHOOL 1,732.50 CORRIGAN, THOMAS SCHOOL 52,017.45 COWLES, JEFFREY D SCHOOL 30,533.50 COZORT, WILLIAM M SCHOOL 83,461.56 CRADDOCK, COURTNEY A SCHOOL 18,284.65 CRONIN, PAULINE A SCHOOL 15,979.16 CROWLEY, ALICE SCHOOL 84,169.81 Page 121 CROWLEY, ELIZABETH M SCHOOL 14,623.97 CRUICE, PETER SCHOOL 540.00 CSELEY, CHERIE M SCHOOL 18,267.49 CULKINS, JAYNE D SCHOOL 812.50 DACEY, SARAH SCHOOL 225.00 DALZELL, ANN G SCHOOL 95,109.64 DALZELL, JAMES SCHOOL 69,737.64 DAUME, ELIZABETH G SCHOOL 85,256.52 D'AUTEUIL, RICHARD M SCHOOL 10,108.72 DAVIDSON, ELIZABETH S SCHOOL 82,001.18 DAVIDSON, MARGARET D SCHOOL 80,436.70 DAVIDSON-CHRISTIE, NANCY SCHOOL 82,928.81 DAVIS, CHARLES E SCHOOL 82,176.52 DAVIS, CRAIG E SCHOOL 937.50 DAVIS, DEBORAH M SCHOOL 85,256.52 DAVIS, JEANNE M SCHOOL 56,894.77 DAY, ROBERT F SCHOOL 93,962.21 DEE, MELISSA V SCHOOL 2,253.00 DEHEART, KATHY J SCHOOL 34,325.88 D'ELIA, LORI SCHOOL 364.00 D'ELIA, RICHELLE SCHOOL 25,740.21 DERAS, ESTELA O SCHOOL 25,521.06 DERAS, FRANCISCO F SCHOOL 63,533.43 DESMOND, KELLY M SCHOOL 13,957.43 DIAMOND, ALLISON L SCHOOL 2,306.00 DUCE, CHARLES A SCHOOL 46,781.06 DWYER, KATHLEEN K SCHOOL 13,797.78 DYER, ANN MARIE SCHOOL 88,677.24 EARLE, REBECCA K SCHOOL 58,444.22 ECHEVERRIA, JACQUELINE SCHOOL 70,885.79 EDZWALD, STACEY J SCHOOL 72,002.03 ELDER, BARBARA SCHOOL 95,213.42 ELLIOTT, SARAH M SCHOOL 2,688.00 EMACK, JANET R SCHOOL 72,511.28 EMACK, KELLY SCHOOL 2,256.50 EVERING-WHITE, AVEREON SCHOOL 800.00 FALES, MARIA L SCHOOL 27,074.08 FALES, TERRY L SCHOOL 35,711.26 FAUCHER, CAROL E SCHOOL 37,288.54 FEE, KATY SCHOOL 16,637.50 FERRANTELLA, LINDA SCHOOL 49,408.70 FERREIRA, CHRISTOPHER J SCHOOL 8,958.00 FEY, JACQUELINE J SCHOOL 88,535.12 FIELD, GLENN L SCHOOL 131,339.17 FLEISCHUT, MICHAEL T SCHOOL 35,000.00 FLORES, ZOILA J SCHOOL 39,136.55 FOURNIER, ERNESTINE SCHOOL 27,183.69 FREED, JANE M SCHOOL 49,628.65 FREITAS, KIMBERLY A SCHOOL 62,744.98 FRONZUTO, SUZANNE SCHOOL 81,098.49 Page 122 FRUSCIONE, KATHRYN SCHOOL 88,370.96 FUSARO, ANASTASIA T SCHOOL 51,139.66 GALSCHNEIDER, TERESA R SCHOOL 1,062.50 GAMBERONI, RENEE E SCHOOL 77,594.26 GAMMONS, AMY SCHOOL 1,137.50 GARDNER, GALEN A SCHOOL 90,893.29 GELLO, KARYN R SCHOOL 59,850.20 GETMAN, WILLIAM D SCHOOL 4,187.50 GILES, NATALIA S SCHOOL 600.00 GIRVIN, MICHAEL SCHOOL 86,271.29 GOSS, VICTORIA SCHOOL 125.00 GOTTLIEB, KAREN S SCHOOL 87,141.96 GOTTLIEB, SETH W SCHOOL 30,335.74 GRAVES, DIANA S SCHOOL 92,110.26 GRAY, MAIKI L SCHOOL 34,701.73 GRAZIADEI, ALICIA E SCHOOL 12,895.00 GREGOIRE, SORRELL SCHOOL 3,177.00 GROSS, NICOLE SCHOOL 562.50 GULLICKSEN, VICTORIA A SCHOOL 19,962.76 HAINEY, PATRICIA A SCHOOL 13,687.50 HAJJAR, MELANIE A SCHOOL 300.00 HALE, JOSEPH SCHOOL 125.00 HALEY, PATRICIA A SCHOOL 6,152.50 HALFORD, JESSICA SCHOOL 873.00 HAMBLIN, NATALIE SCHOOL 51,074.87 HAMMER-YANKOW, ROBIN SCHOOL 5,517.85 HANNIFORD, SHANTEL SCHOOL 1,032.00 HANSON, STEPHANIE SCHOOL 85,062.63 HARDIMAN, SHAUNA M SCHOOL 76,979.47 HARDING, PATRICIA SCHOOL 45,734.23 HARDY, JANE N SCHOOL 49,077.80 HARIMON, TANDI J SCHOOL 31,027.91 HARRINGTON, ANN L SCHOOL 30,256.40 HARRINGTON, CORINNE SCHOOL 56,108.11 HARRINGTON, DANIELLE SCHOOL 687.50 HARRINGTON, NENITA SCHOOL 18,336.08 HARVEY, STANLEY E SCHOOL 2,625.00 HASTINGS, HENRY SCHOOL 64,976.44 HAYFORD, SUSAN C SCHOOL 36,718.56 HEAD, ROBERT R SCHOOL 72,038.47 HEHIR, LUCY M SCHOOL 16,010.25 HERTZ, DOROTHY A SCHOOL 3,646.50 HICKMAN, REBECCA M SCHOOL 71,399.60 HICKSON, KATHLEEN A SCHOOL 62,530.81 HILLSBERG, JAN P SCHOOL 1,500.00 HITCHCOCK, ALEXANDRA SCHOOL 2,905.50 HITCHCOCK, ELISABETTA M SCHOOL 52,915.13 HOBSON-DUPONT, JANE SCHOOL 96,721.37 HOLDGATE, DEBORAH F SCHOOL 47,579.03 HOLDGATE, KRISTEN SCHOOL 61,397.75 Page 123 HOLDGATE, SARAH SCHOOL 100,620.58 HOLLAND-OLIVER, RENEE B SCHOOL 7,572.50 HOLTON-ROTH, SARAH A SCHOOL 23,755.26 HOOD, LISA A SCHOOL 88,481.50 HORGAN, KATY A SCHOOL 60,319.84 HORTON, MICHAEL F SCHOOL 112,613.20 HOSKINS, TINA SCHOOL 227.50 HOWES, MARGO H SCHOOL 35,339.16 HULL, ANA P SCHOOL 2,631.25 HULL, JESSICA M SCHOOL 15,952.23 HULL, JOAN M SCHOOL 31,717.84 ILLER, JENNIFER A SCHOOL 875.00 JASKULA, JOYCE M SCHOOL 4,154.00 JELLEME, KRISTINA SCHOOL 1,250.00 JOHNSEN, JOANNE C SCHOOL 51,290.32 JOHNSON, STEPHANIE C SCHOOL 89,045.24 JONES, HELAINA M SCHOOL 65,003.84 JONES, MARGARET SCHOOL 1,890.00 JUDSON, NICOLAAS F SCHOOL 6,890.00 KANYOCK, DAVID SCHOOL 113,202.04 KEARNS, SETH M SCHOOL 58,725.91 KELLY, GEORGE F SCHOOL 90,953.60 KELLY, LINDA A SCHOOL 92,408.52 KENNEDY, ROBERT S SCHOOL 102.30 KERVIN, SUSAN SCHOOL 35,789.76 KESSLER, DONNA E SCHOOL 85,442.02 KESSLER, ROBERT M SCHOOL 32,881.04 KEYES, CARYNNE A SCHOOL 1,125.00 KITSOCK, AILEEN M SCHOOL 57,466.40 KNAPP, AMY W SCHOOL 80,908.96 LAMB, DONNA M SCHOOL 1,920.00 LAMB, LAURA L SCHOOL 31,203.64 LAREDO, JENNIFER R SCHOOL 91,571.35 LAREDO, STEVEN SCHOOL 91,197.76 LARRABEE, JOANNE M SCHOOL 35,487.59 LARRABEE, KATHRYN L SCHOOL 18,141.25 LATTER, CLAIRE R SCHOOL 62,384.79 LATTER, MARK S SCHOOL 5,019.00 LAWRENCE, DEBRA SCHOOL 35,586.26 LECHICH, STEPHANIE M SCHOOL 487.50 LEIGHTON, NANCY W SCHOOL 13,424.40 LEMAITRE, ANNE J SCHOOL 81,465.90 LEMUS, EDY SCHOOL 20,897.80 LEMUS, LUCIA E SCHOOL 36,837.73 LEONE, RICHARD SCHOOL 375.00 LEPORE, CATHLEEN E SCHOOL 98,214.08 LIDDLE, ROBERT J SCHOOL 51,265.25 LINDQUIST, KAROL M SCHOOL 4,588.15 LINDSAY, ERIN SCHOOL 2,220.00 LITTLE, EMILY SCHOOL 1,027.00 Page 124 LOCARIO, NINA L SCHOOL 88,868.28 LOMBARDI, ADRIENE L SCHOOL 69,977.52 LOMBARDI, LAURA K SCHOOL 3,330.00 LOMBARDI, TRAVIS SCHOOL 26,975.00 LONG, MEILSSA SCHOOL 55,997.44 LOUCKS, SHERRY L SCHOOL 52,032.62 LOWELL, ERIC SCHOOL 3,060.00 LOZACH, JACLYN J SCHOOL 40,459.58 LUCCHINI, JOHN E SCHOOL 98,405.46 MACDONALD, HEATHER G SCHOOL 63,965.52 MACHADO, VAUGHAN SCHOOL 4,000.00 MACIVER, ERIN E SCHOOL 75,246.06 MACK, SUSAN M SCHOOL 1,812.50 MACKAY, PETER SCHOOL 5,446.00 MACLELLAN, GEORGE S SCHOOL 87,544.91 MACVICAR, MELISSA B SCHOOL 74,052.03 MAHER, ANDREA SCHOOL 76,381.46 MAHONEY, 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MILLER, NANCY SCHOOL 67,307.66 MILLIGAN, HEATHER SCHOOL 1,064.00 MINELLA, JOSEPH SCHOOL 9,625.00 MOGENSEN, WILLIAM B SCHOOL 31,111.72 Page 125 MOLLOY, JAKE SCHOOL 396.00 MOONEY, KATHLEEN S SCHOOL 75,740.70 MOORES, MARY L SCHOOL 74,929.53 MORAN, JOHN T SCHOOL 3,800.00 MORAN, LORI A SCHOOL 9,248.00 MORAN, LUCIANA SCHOOL 4,640.00 MORRIS, ELIZABETH A SCHOOL 98,034.14 MORROW, ANDREA C SCHOOL 20,162.50 MOYER, JACQUELINE SCHOOL 5,019.00 MUISE, LINDA A SCHOOL 66,467.96 MULCAHY, JANE SCHOOL 750.00 MULSON, JESSICA L SCHOOL 43,501.17 MURPHY, JOANN S SCHOOL 92,535.29 MYERS, GILLEAN SCHOOL 56,689.45 NATCHEVA, VESSELA R SCHOOL 68,263.57 NEDELCHEVA, HRISTINA SCHOOL 720.00 NEWMAN, JODY V SCHOOL 93,514.13 NIELSEN, CARA E SCHOOL 17,751.69 NOLL, BRENDA SCHOOL 49,144.06 NORTON, ROBERT L SCHOOL 89,658.52 OBREMSKI, ELIZABETH A SCHOOL 4,415.00 O'KEEFE, BETH M SCHOOL 87,394.23 O'KEEFE, TRACY A SCHOOL 35,022.22 OLIVER, ERNEST J SCHOOL 42,770.68 OLSON, MICHELLE J SCHOOL 87,180.07 OLSZEWSKI, KAREN A SCHOOL 88,621.83 ORELLANA-EGAN, IRENE SCHOOL 103,281.55 PANCHY, PETER S SCHOOL 101,243.30 PARIZEAU, MOLLY SCHOOL 866.25 PARKER, MARY SCHOOL 2,125.00 PARKER, MATTHEW J SCHOOL 47.50 PELLICONE, ROBERT W SCHOOL 171,062.14 PERRY, CODIE SCHOOL 3,696.00 PERRY, JOSEPH F SCHOOL 59,408.35 PHANEUF, ANNE M SCHOOL 86,835.24 PIGNATO, JAMES B SCHOOL 83,402.50 PIGNATO, STEPHEN R SCHOOL 12,777.50 PILLION, GARY W SCHOOL 4,554.01 PINEDA VIVAS, SAUL A SCHOOL 42,964.17 POLLOCK, RHONDA L SCHOOL 6,825.00 POPOVA, SOFIYA V SCHOOL 28,095.43 POTTER, BRIAN SCHOOL 41,147.63 POTTER, MARGARET SCHOOL 31,321.04 PRINTER, JEAN C SCHOOL 91,985.26 PROCH, NICHOLAS SCHOOL 3,852.00 PROCH, PAULINE L SCHOOL 97,897.92 PROCH, THOMAS P SCHOOL 1,200.00 PSARADELIS, JENNIFER C SCHOOL 90,934.67 PSARADELIS, TIMOTHY C SCHOOL 69,610.20 RAVEN, KERRY A SCHOOL 750.00 Page 126 RAY, BONNIE S SCHOOL 80,640.98 REAVES, TARYN SCHOOL 19,752.85 REID, MEILSSA SCHOOL 76.50 REID, ROBERT J SCHOOL 3,445.00 REINEMO, ELIZABETH M SCHOOL 69,719.22 REINEMO, 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SCHOOL 2,000.00 TRAVAGLIONE, RICHARD SCHOOL 19,020.69 UBALDINO, LAURA J SCHOOL 74,128.70 VAITES, AMY L SCHOOL 86,835.24 VANDERWOLK, AMEILA B SCHOOL 1,660.00 VANVORST, JOYCE W SCHOOL 33,088.99 VIGIL, RYAN H SCHOOL 310.00 VIVAS, JORGE A SCHOOL 40,436.12 WALLACE, SKY SCHOOL 285.00 WATSON, JAMIE SCHOOL 360.00 WATTY, BRENDA D SCHOOL 22,142.06 WEAVER, LINNEA SCHOOL 87,856.52 WEBB, DAVID SCHOOL 123,275.14 WELCH, CHRISTOPHER J SCHOOL 1,344.00 WENDELKEN, ERIK SCHOOL 82,394.73 WHEELER, KAREN SCHOOL 3,000.00 WHITE, MARK SCHOOL 2,000.00 WILLIAMS, JEDEDIAYAH SCHOOL 42,130.23 WILLIAMS, STACEY T SCHOOL 41,248.76 WILLIAMSON, SALLY R SCHOOL 3,937.50 WILSON, ASHLEY SCHOOL 640.00 WODYNSKI, JUDITH SCHOOL 312.50 WOLFF, BRIANNE M SCHOOL 55,870.20 WOODLEY, BONNIE O SCHOOL 35,428.82 ZODDA, MARIA SCHOOL 125.00 BENCHLEY, ROBERT SCONSET WATER 820.00 CHARNES, JAMES E SCONSET WATER 84,484.58 BUTLER, PERRY L SEWER/WASTEWATER 74,583.57 CROWLEY, ROBERT J SEWER/WASTEWATER 33,755.66 GRAY, DAVID C SEWER/WASTEWATER 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